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Jesus Creed


Palin?

posted by xscot mcknight

What do you think of McCain’s VP choice? Sarah Palin, governor of Alaska.
palin2.jpgpalin4.jpg



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ChrisB

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:22 am


I think it changes the game somewhat. She’s a good conservative with a great story. She’s the only one in the race with actual, if limited, executive experience. And, of course, she’s a she.
I hate that she’s being brought in as a lure for PUMAs. Like Ferraro she’s there first and foremost because she’s a woman. I’d have preferred to save her for a time when she was chosen for her merits rather than her sex.



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Rick

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:25 am


Great choice. As ChrisB said, the game has changed somewhat.



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preson phillips

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:28 am


She’s a first term governor… I guess that means we won’t be arguing over experience anymore.



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Steve K.

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:32 am


Oh Scot, now you’ve done it, posted an open-ended question without any perimeters on how nice we have to be ;-)
I’ll try to be nice: I think McCain’s choice of Palin for VP is mostly political maneuvering, chosen primarily for gender rather than any real trust relationship or experience/ability. She is someone who will probably not do much harm to McCain, and she seems to me (right now anyway) like someone McCain can control and tell what to do. I don’t envy her at all ;-)
Would McCain have picked a woman if Obama was not already making history as our first black nominee for president? I have serious doubts.
Palin seems pretty sharp, but do I really think McCain knows her and respects her the way that Obama and Biden have shown they are a strong team? Umm, no.
How well will she be able to convince us that she is NOT the second coming of Dan Quayle?
And lastly, how does everyone feel Palin will match up with Putin? I’d rather have Biden in that fight, wouldn’t you?



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Steve K.

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:35 am


Did I say “perimeters”? I meant “parameters”! Sheesh …



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George D

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:35 am


I’m frankly surprised… doesn’t appeal to the faith crowd, clearly (by anyone’s standards) not experienced enough to be president (especially if McCain thinks Obama lacks the experience!) and will get eaten alive by Joe Biden.
Positives: nice to have a woman on the ticket, young and fresh, understands energy policy as well as anyone (even if you disagree with her).
Not a game changer at all… a bit ho-hum… but not terrible either.
But it does seem that the experience issue has been given up by McCain… just as well after last night’s Obama speech.



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Dan Brennan

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:41 am


I don’t know much about her, but I think its great that he chose a woman. For those who are undecided, it gives them something to think about. It shows he’s not afraid of “change.” Because of his perceived strength (experience) he has a “luxury” that Obama didn’t have. Still, I think in November, people will vote for the one is running for president, not for the ticket, itself. The VP is “a” factor; but overall, its just one factor among many factors that pull voters to vote for the candidate.



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Doug

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:55 am


In an interview just a month ago, she dissed the job, saying it didn?t seem ?productive.? It robs Republicans of their most effective argument against Sen. Barack Obama that he lacks experience.
Before Palin?s election in December 2006 as the state?s first woman governor, she served terms on the city council of Wasilla, Alaska (population 6,700), and two terms as the mayor/manager of Wasilla.
City Council and Mayor/Manager of a small Alaskan town ?
This is baffling for sure.



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Gavin

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:05 am


Palin IS the culture of life, has LIVED it, which is quite the opposite of what Obama represents (his professed faith in Jesus Christ, notwithstanding)…
http://albertmohler.com/blog_read.php?id=1144



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Bill

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:07 am


Anybody with the “experience” factor seemed to be pro-choice. When Dr. Dobson fell silent, I knew the person McKain would pick was going to be pro-life and more conservative. This may mean he sees pro-life and garnering the female vote as being the way to go.
Remember, a vote for McKain means you would want Palin to be the President if leaves the scene. Do you want Biden to be President?



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Jake Meador

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:11 am


It’s interesting to me that both vp selections seem to undermine one of the main arguments either campaign has made. It’s hard for Obama to continue to argue that he’s the candidate of change when his vp has been in the senate for 35 years. But it’s equally hard for McCain to argue that he’s the experience candidate when his vp is even more inexperienced than Obama. Perhaps they’re both trying to balance the tickets?



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JR

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:12 am


I think it steps a bit on the Republican message about the necessity of foreign policy experience in a dangerous world, which is only area where polls really favor Republicans. I would think that Obama and Biden have more combined experience than McCain and Palin.



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Lewis

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:13 am


I think with Palin, McCain just won the election. Perfect choice. I’m glad he picked her out of left (no pun intended) field. Great choice and I can finally be excited about the McCain ticket.



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Dana Ames

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:23 am


All of the above. Very cagey move, looking like “the old McCain”, but also could appear a bit desperate. It’s a good news/bad news thing for women… *almost* made me consider voting for McCain, but just can’t get past his policies on Iraq, health care and energy. It’s is still the presidential candidate who matters most.
I have the CSPAN feed running while I write this, and all the signs saying “Country First” make me, as a Christian, very nervous…
Dana



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D C Cramer

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:25 am


Anyone concerned that two of her daughters are named Willow… and Piper?
[Just joking.]



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Mike Swalm

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:32 am


would’ve preferred Michael Palin. Now THAT GUY would’ve made a great vp.



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Chris

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:35 am


This is now an historic election no matter the outcome. Either we have the first African-Americal President or the first female Vice-President. I say it is about time on either front.



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phil_style

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:36 am


From #4 – “And lastly, how does everyone feel Palin will match up with Putin? I?d rather have Biden in that fight, wouldn?t you?”
I would be hoping for the person who was least likely to invovle all of us in a fight. If the USA and Russia start fighting, it’s the rest of us who get caught in the middle. . .



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ChrisB

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:38 am


Not appealing to religious? She has 5 kids, one w/ Downs that she flatly refused to abort.
Experience? Not as important for a VP, but 2 years as governor vs 4 years as senator (with 3 spent running for president) isn’t so bad.
someone McCain can control and tell what to do
I don’t know; she seems pretty fiery. I’ll bet she can hold her own.



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Alaina

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:40 am


I’m concerned by her lack of experience. I’m worried she was chosen for her female-hood.
As much as I would love a female VP or an African-American president or anything other than middle-aged (elderly?) white male in Washington. I don’t want either to come because of their gender or race, but because of their stance on policy and ability to execute policy.
She has an uphill battle to convince me she’s ready for the second of those tasks.



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D. Burkum

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:42 am


Should have gone with Pawlenty.



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bill

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:44 am


Well I’ll try to nice.
Palin who?
Big deal? Really I just don’t care. Maybe this has more to do with bringing a woman into the limelight for races in the future. If a candidate was chosen for VP based soley on her pro-life stance may God have mercy on us all. It makes as much sense as voters who are single issue voters.
I’m pro life meaning I want fewer abortions but to use that as a litmus test seems absurd. If the US votes in a combination of that and race then we will get what we deserve.



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Rick

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:52 am


From listening to talk radio and reading some of the comments here, it appears McCain has managed to show he is still a maverick, has fire-up his base for the 1st time, and has managed to frustrate his opponents. He is having a very good day.



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Rick

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:53 am


correction on #23-
should say “…has fired-up his base….”



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Al Hsu

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:55 am


I didn’t recognize Palin’s name at first, but after reading her bio on Wikipedia I realized that I had read articles earlier about her and her son with Down syndrome. Something like 90% of babies prenatally diagnosed with Down syndrome are terminated, but the Palins chose life. As a father of a son with Down syndrome, I am very encouraged by her prolife commitment and hope that Palin’s candidacy helps people recognize the full personhood and value of children with Down syndrome (or any disability).



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:mic

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:01 am


Game. Set. Match.
Well done, McCain.



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Robin Rhea

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:01 am


I think it was a great choice. She is solidly pro-life, she energizes the R base that is either limited-government or pro-gun, she is young and a Washington outsider, her husband is a blue collar guy (commercial fisherman) and she supports drilling in Alaska. Even if you don’t like any of those positions, she just solidified McCain’s base’s excitement and… if he had chosen Pawlenty, Romney, etc., everyone on cable news would have yawned and gone back to talking about Obama’s speech, now they have a reason to talk about the Republican side and show up for the convention next week. The race just got a whole lot tighter.



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Tony

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:01 am


PERFECT! … as for experience, she has a ton more than Obama–did you hear her political accomplishments—-please tell me ONE thing Obama has done! he can’t even name one!
Can you say: President McCane, Vice-President Palin.



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Robin Rhea

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:04 am


One last thing, I have seen people elsewhere comment that she is under investigation for having her brother-in-law fired…but the contention is that he was beating her sister (his wife) so I don’t think that allegation will hurt her too much.



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Sam Andrress

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:05 am


She has a ton more experience than Obama. Let’s be rational. She was a mayor in small town Alasaka and has been the governor of a state that is quite different than big city mainland states.
Obviously it was a pick to grab disgruntled Hilary supporters. What they don’t realize is that Hilary supporters are a sisterhood and she just told the sisterhood that to vote for McCain is to vote against her.
McCain just clinched the loss, but it will make for an interesting campaign.



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Drew

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:07 am


I think this changes the whole game.
McCain has just stole the “juices” from Obama. Any momentum from last night, is over.
I had leanings to Obama, but now I think the election is over with this… I work in a very liberal secular field, and already people are jumping over to the Palin-McCain ticket.



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David G.

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:08 am


Are any independent candidates out there???



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Ken

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:20 am


Brilliant, Brilliant! Now I can vote for McCain without guilt. I think he just won the election.



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Dana Ames

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:27 am


David G #32,
They’re out there, but they don’t stand an ice cube’s chance in Death Valley of getting elected.
Dana



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Kim

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:29 am


Amen, Ken (#33)!!! I was pleasantly surprised by McCain’s choice!!! Maybe some former Hillary supporters I know will jump over to the McCain-Palin ticket now, too! :)



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Friar_Tuck

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:30 am


Brilliant, in my opinion. See my blog if you want to hear more from a former Alaskan with Alaskan family.



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Steve

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:33 am


Robin #28 said,
“One last thing, I have seen people elsewhere comment that she is under investigation for having her brother-in-law fired?but the contention is that he was beating her sister (his wife) so I don?t think that allegation will hurt her too much.”
…because? because…possibly abusing executive power counts as political accomplishment for Tony #27?



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Luke

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:35 am


This will be an interesting race. No candidate has “buried” the other, and none is sure of winning yet (so enough with those statements). None of this has changed the fact that I am voting for Obama though, I can guarantee you that.
(Why are there so many absolutes going on? “McCain will surely win now” “Obama just buried McCain” etc. Also, why would her being on the ticket cause liberals to vote for McCain now? That makes no sense at all, because she’s about as conservative as you get, regardless of being a female, that just seems to be an ignorant statement. That’s like saying I’m going to watch Fox news now because they hired John Hagee)



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Mike K

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:41 am


Agree with others that McCain will have to abandon the experience rhetoric with a two-year governor as veep and a 72-year-old presidential candidate. They were obviously trying to capitalize on the divisiveness of the Clinton camp within the Democratic party and they may have scored some points with some Clinton supporters…however I don’t think it will be enough to win the election in Nov. I think the selection of a woman as veep to pick up the disgruntaled Clintonites will be seen as pandering and will backfire with most of these folks.



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Dan Rose

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:42 am


It was a pure political move to balance the “first” thing. Anyway, both sides are interesting. Neither are perfect and both have their strengths.



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Robin Rhea

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:43 am


Steve,
I don’t think it will hurt her too much because people think that men who beat their wives shouldn’t be cops and if his boss was covering for him because there is a culture of corruption or entitlement in the police force then he deserved to be fired too…I think most people will say, “yeah, she went out of bounds to fire him, but that b$%^ard deserves what’s coming for beating his wife”



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Mike K

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:47 am


Agree with Luke #38…I think this will be a very close election like we have seen in recent past. A lot can happen between now and Nov…if we have learned anything we should have learned that…



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Rachel H. Evans

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:48 am


I think McCain is pandering a bit. As a woman, I find it a little irritating that he would put a woman with so little experience (who is clearly not qualified to be commander-in-chief) on the ticket in an effort to pick up those disgruntled Hillary supporters. It almost feels like she’s the “token” woman, and we ladies can spot this sort of exploitation from a mile away! I think it’s a gamble he will lose.
If you want a woman in the White House, make it a STRONG and QUALIFIED woman. Biden’s going to eat her for lunch in the V.P. debate.



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Glenn

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:49 am


“In 2007, Palin had an approval rating often in the 90s.A poll published by Hays Research on July 28, 2008 showed Palin’s approval rating at 80%” Experience? Gov. Palin has challenged established political figures in Alaska, made some major changes even though she’s been in office a limited time and has more executive experience than Obama and a personal story to match. I believe it’s a major mistake by the Democrats to take Palin lightly.



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Ken

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:50 am


Rachel (#43), I don’t think Biden will eat her for lunch, as she took out incumbent Gov. Frank Murkowsk in 2006.



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Scott W

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:56 am


Given McCain’s age, would you entrust this nation to someone who’s been a small-town mayor and a first-term governor of rural state? Does she have a real vision for the nation? What does she know about the economy? About national defense? Energy policy–that’s the possible exception,which may give us more insight than anything else about this choice. This looks like a Geraldine Ferraro-type choice.



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Tony

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:57 am


Steve #37 … did you hear all she has accomplished in the time she’s been Govenor? WOW … read #44 (and that’s just scratching teh surface! Again, somebody tell me what has Obama accomplished while in Senate, or any gov. position?????
Even Obama can’t tell us!



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Steph

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:00 pm


love it love it LOVE IT. am SO MUCH MORE energized about the McCain ticket now. Wonderful!



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Scot McKnight

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:06 pm


OK, Tony, you’ve made your point. You seem more intent on scoring points against Obama than anything else. There are lots of claims there today, some over the top, but we want to reign in our critique.



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qb

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:06 pm


GENIUS pick…
thrilled and energized qb



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Mike K

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:09 pm


I love the discussion because it is a great example of how unaware we are of our own biases…for some folks if McCain had picked a street person they would say what a wonderful selection it was…”someone who really knows what poverty is all about…” However, the same can be said of some rabid Obama supporters as well.
How prone we all are to see what we want to see….



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ChrisB

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:14 pm


Re: the ex-brother-in-law, Palin asked for an investigation — usually a good sign she has nothing to hide.
Re: her being so young, inexperienced, etc — If McCain and co wanted “a woman,” they could have been Kay Bailey Hutchison or Elizabeth Dole or a half-dozen others. If they picked her, it’s for a reason; we’ll see if it’s convincing.



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Ken

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:15 pm


Thanks, Mike, for being John Hick’s king who stands above the fray, amused by all the blind men groping around the elephant. I think you’ve given us humble and clear vision on the matter.



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Rick

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:29 pm


Mike K #51-
“for some folks if McCain had picked a street person they would say what a wonderful selection it was”
I think you may be wrong about that. McCain had no excited base, and people who will vote for him (some reluctantly) would have been some of the 1st to criticize some of the picks he could have made.
That is one thing that makes this pick interesting- it has energized a base.
That being said, you are right on our need to keep in mind our own biases.



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garver

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:31 pm


Palin is an interesting choice. I’m not sure I entirely understand it.
I can see how she’s appealing in a variety of ways, but I don’t think she’ll do much to attract former Hillary supporters unless they were already inclined towards McCain. Palin will likely help solidify McCain’s base, especially with religious conservatives. So some folks who may have been inclined to sit this election out, might be persuaded to vote McCain with Palin on the ticket.
I do think it is a bit odd that McCain would pick someone with so little experience in national and international affairs, given his criticisms of Obama.
Overall, I’m not sure how much of a difference the Palin choice will make. It’s going to be a close race no matter what.



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Mike K

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:41 pm


“That being said, you are right on our need to keep in mind our own biases.”
Rick #54, this was the point I was trying to make (somewhat unsuccessfully with my Ann Coulter-like pronunciation about the choice of a street person) Apologies to those who might have been offended by my poor choice of words.
However, I see this so much in politics (and religion). We jump on a bandwagon that by necessity makes us align with a certain person or way of thinking that we become completely unaware of the presuppositions that we are made to swallow in order to maintain allegiance. We become blind to other points of view and feel very justified in our position. You can see this in some of the comments to this blog. We need to be aware of this in politics and our faith.



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Robin Rhea

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:43 pm


Mike,
I understand your point, but I don’t think it is true. As an R, I was willing to accept Pawlenty or Romney, but none too excited. Now that I found out it is Palin I am excited and I think this will energize the R ticket in a way other picks never could have.



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Rick

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:45 pm


A great choice and what a super speech.



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Mike K

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:54 pm


Rhea #57 Just interested in why Palin makes this so much more exciting than Pawlenty or Romney? I think (as some others beside myself have stated) the lack of experience issue is not small in her case…
What does she bring to the table that makes you excited about the ticket now?…just wanting to understand here.



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Luke

posted August 29, 2008 at 1:01 pm


I have the same questions as Mike. Honestly, I think that it’s just Republicans who were already going to vote for McCain getting excited about it to try and reassure them of their vote and their hopes for him winning the election. In other words, this is not a “huge advantage” for McCain and will not affect many votes on his part.
In other words, please stop saying that McCain is going to “definitely win with this ticket,” because it’s just not true and nobody will know that until November.



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qb

posted August 29, 2008 at 1:16 pm


“In other words, this is not a huge advantage for McCain and will not affect many votes on his part.”
Luke (#60), if it stems the tide of disaffected conservatives who were inclined either to stay home or cast a throwaway vote for Bob Barr (ugh), Palin’s selection may indeed have a significant effect on “many votes,” helping us avoid what would be a…well, I guess I can’t finish that thought here.
In any event, I don’t think it represents a “huge advantage” for McCain, but I do think it represents something that may help McCain overcome the mainstream media’s breathtaking, almost pornographic bias (see also “Chris Matthews”) in favor of McCain’s opponent. In other words, it may help us level the public-exposure playing field just a little. And every little bit helps.
Plus, she’s the real deal when it comes to limited-government conservatism. Assuming that the Democratic opponent was even marginally acceptable – Lloyd Bentsen or Sam Nunn at the TOP of the ticket come to mind – I’d almost rather the GOP lose with a respectably conservative ticket than win with a Rockefeller liberal one.
qb



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Kacie

posted August 29, 2008 at 1:27 pm


I love her, I think it was a great pick on McCain’s part… who knows, with this in her background (even if it’s just a run at VP), maybe she’ll run for president someday.
BUT…
Her little Downs baby is under a year old. Yes, she chose life, which is great. But I’ve watched my own family walk through the shock and adjustment that comes with having a child with Downs Syndrome. They require extra care. I find it very sad that this little boy could lose much of his time with his mom over the next few years.
That doesn’t have much to do with the presidency, but I don’t like it.
Kacie



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stephen

posted August 29, 2008 at 1:35 pm


It’s an incredibly risky and poor choice, totally demolishing his argument about Obama’s experience. He should have picked Kay Bailey Hutchinson.
McCain just lost the election.



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Syler

posted August 29, 2008 at 2:00 pm


LOL #16– Michael Palin. Brilliant.
I’m a little shocked that anyone thinks this is anything but a desperate, kneejerk response to trying to court Hillary supporters. Seriously: mayor of a small town, former beauty pageant runner-up, and governor of one of the smallest states (population-wise) in the country? This will energize the conservatives but I think will push the moderates to the left. She seems like a spunky, cool person with strong convictions which is great, but…prepared to be a heartbeat away from leading the most powerful nation in the world?
Excellent point #62 about the fact that this little child with Down’s could lose even more of his mom’s attention. Granted, her dad is the homemaker now, but still: we’ll be hearing all next week about how great it is that she carried this baby to term, but how will her being VP affect his life?
This isn’t Dan Quayle– remember that Quayle won one election. Folks, this is Adm. James Stockdale, Perot’s VP choice in 1992: in my opinion, a deal-breaker.



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Deborah

posted August 29, 2008 at 2:02 pm


I spent the morning weeping for joy…
A Woman!
A Governor (someone with Executive branch experience)!
A Politician with an 80% approval rating!
(our Legislative branch has an 18% approval rating and
all of the other candidates serve as Senators!?)
This definitely makes things interesting…and I am more interested in being involved.



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Lou

posted August 29, 2008 at 2:13 pm


Since Obama’s nomination essentially took experience as a qualification off the table, then it left party or ideologic credentials and special qualifications (race, gender) as a viable factor. This young lady is clearly very impressive (as is Mr Obama) in her accomplishments and with what she brings to the ticket. Solid conservative and proven pro-life and conservative credentials (see the fact that she knew she was going to have a baby with Down’s and understood the Lord’s work in play-she lived pro-life).
Comes from a true blue collar background and is a model for women everywhere. I applaud the pick, though I do think it is a risky political move on McCain’s part.



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Kathy Khang

posted August 29, 2008 at 2:13 pm


McCain just lost ground on his “experience” argument against Obama. I don’t see this move as surprising. McCain needed buzz and now he’s got it. We’ll see if it’s the good kind of buzz.
This makes it interesting as Biden has been known to get a wee bit aggressive when taking on opponents – will he be seen as a bully taking on Palin because she is a woman? Will she be seen as too strong or her ability to lead be called into question because she is a mother and wife? I don’t question her ability to take on Biden, but it will be how this all plays out in the public.



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Ted M. Gossard

posted August 29, 2008 at 2:21 pm


I think it’s great that he picked a woman. And she seems qualified except for lack of experience. And with McCain’s age and some health concerns, this ought to concern us. At the same time, she can make up for that by getting good help around her. And she may be a fast learner.
I was thinking that for me Obama’s relative lack of experience (I wish he had 10 or 15 more years of such, under his belt) factors into my thinking on this election, but now McCain’s pick makes that a bit less of a factor, with Palin just a “heart beat” away. I would think that if McCain gets elected, she’ll have important work which will help her be ready, if the time comes, to be president.
Overall, a good choice, I think. And should be a most interesting election. I’m even getting more interested now! And like I said on the previous post on Obama, I did like his speech on many counts.



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Lou

posted August 29, 2008 at 2:37 pm


Saw this on Palin:
Her Christian faith–Palin grew up attending nondenominational Bible churches–was a minor issue in the race. She told me her faith affects her politics this way: “I believe everything happens for a purpose. In my own personal life, if I dedicated back to my Creator what I’m trying to create for the good . . . everything will turn out fine.” That same concept applies to her political career, she suggested.



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sheryl

posted August 29, 2008 at 2:44 pm


I am ECSTATIC and energized about Gov. Palin as the VP. Considering the other choices, this was a brilliant pick by the McCain campaign. I am so glad he chose a governor and not another senator.
Palin brings a lot to the table: She has worked through the ranks of government yet is not a career politician, has executive experience, through-the roof approval ratings in Alaska, beat an incumbent and fellow Republican for governor, is not a Washington insider, has nothing to hide from her past, is a female who promotes ideas rather than her gender, has a strong family, and actually acts as an elected servant of the people. All this in addition to her many positives with policy issues. Now THIS is change I can believe in.



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Robin Rhea

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:16 pm


Mike,
here are the reasons I am excited about Palin. She is soundly pro-life (several of the VP options were not) she is fiscally conservative (several were not, and I think that is why the base hates the current crop) she is from a blue collar background (her husband is a fisherman) she has demonstrated that she is a reformer and opposed corruption by running against her own state party, the democrats will have a hard time trying to attack her without being seen as sexist or condescending, she is from outside the establishment and can’t be blamed for the mess in Washington, and most importantly, she is young and attractive. Normally this last point wouldn’t matter, but with the constant adoration the press throws at Obama, especially during the last week, the thought of a republican convention with two white haired guys leading the ticket and a bunch of other white haired guys giving the speeches would paint the R party as incredibly boring.
To be clear, I would have voted R anyway, unless there was a viable libertarian candidate, now I just think lots more people will give the R party a 2nd look.



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Robin Rhea

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:27 pm


A couple more things Mike…I really like it that most of her experience is in small towns, Barack has been accused of hostility toward those groups and I think this might endear them more to the R ticket. Hi first statement today seemed to make fun of her for her small town experience but then he quickly issued a second, more positive, statement.
A general word about experience, for a long time Tim Kaine was the presumptive D VP and nobody said, “he’s only been a governor for 2 years… She has as much experience as most of the people Obama was vetting (Kaine, Warner, Sebelius) she has actual legislative ACCOMPLISHMENTS, I’m not saying her experience is greater than Obama’s, but she has accomplished more (you get to take more credit as an executive that pushed legislation through than as 1 of 100 senators that vote for the legislation, just like Bill Clinton gets more credit for NAFTA than Bob Dole [who voted for it])
Also, I don’t think McCain has to attack Obama’s experience, he can attack judgement still, he can point out that O&B were against the surge and predicted it would fail, that Biden wanted to chop the country into three countries, or that Obama initially backed Russia in the Georgia conflict…all I am saying is he can still attack judgement without attacking experience…and it might work.



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Ken

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:35 pm


Robin (#71), I’m thinking about switching my Facebook profile from Libertarian to Republican.



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Robin Rhea

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:37 pm


Last thing, I think, how amazing is it that someone can basically go from PTA meetings and managing a town of less than 10,000 to running for VP in a few short years…this is the kind of stuff they make movies about, and for those of us that don’t really care for people who serve in positions of authority for half a century and line their pockets, this is a really positive thing, that a regular citizen without Harvard connections (Obama) or an important family (McCain, Romney, all the Kennedy’s) can still have a shot is an incredibly optimistic view of government.



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Scot McKnight

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:39 pm


We’ve just watched some highlights of Palin’s talk … the Dems have a battle on their hands. McCain’s charisma just showed up in the form of Sarah Palin.



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Wes Ellis

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:39 pm


McCain’s choice just makes me angry. His choice of a woman is exploitative of women. She was chosen to pick up votes from people who wanted Hilary… that’s a bad reason. With this, Obama emerges as a much better vote, he thinks hard about who he surrounds himself with and he does it with good motives. My respect for McCain is diminishing.



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glenn

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:49 pm


as a transatlantic observer of your election process, the choice of Ms Palin strikes me as patronising to women. If the hillary factor hadn’t been an issue for the democrats, I can’t even imagine a reason why Mr McCain would choose Ms Palin as a running mate.
Seems to me that on the R side, some of the cracks in the glass ceiling have been hastily repaired.



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Pete

posted August 29, 2008 at 4:02 pm


Probably the only one of the 4 major players on either ticket that average and real Americans can relate to, and can relate to our issues.



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Scott W

posted August 29, 2008 at 4:18 pm


Ideological consistency or religious orthodoxy does not make one an astute or wise politician–the Bush years is prime evidence of this!!!! I pray that I’m wrong but the Palin nomination looks like a possible disaster for the country if McCain is elected and something happens to him.
What qualifies someone for office is not simply a litany of electible characteristics or simply sterling moral character.These times require a real breadth of understanding of history,the times and an incisive vision of where we need to go, as we wrestle with an increasingly complex social order, both nationally and internationally.I don’t see what McCain is doing by crafting this choice will prepare us for the challenges ahead.



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Cameron

posted August 29, 2008 at 4:22 pm


I can’t believe (comments 62 and 64, I’m looking at you) there are people who are worried about the effect Palin’s nomination and possible Vice-Presidency will have on her children. There seems to be an implication that whilst Dad can keep the kids fed, they really need Mum at home.
Would these comments have been made if Palin were a man? Maybe Obama should wait until his kids are grown up too.



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Ken

posted August 29, 2008 at 4:26 pm


I find it interesting that all presidents who won election after JFK came from Southern or Western states. McCain went far west to make it AZ/AK (r) vs. IL/DE (d). Does that seal the deal, or will this truly be an election of change?



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Alice

posted August 29, 2008 at 4:39 pm


I have to be honest, I know nothing about this person. I need to learn more. As does 90% of the country, I bet.
In the meantime, I must confess my first reaction was to remember George Bush’s nomination of Harriet Meirs(sp?) to the Supreme Court. Do you remember that? After a few days of learning about her lack of relevant experience and expertise for the job, I just felt embarassed for her. Like she just should have told Bush, “Thanks, but no thanks. I’m not qualified” in order to save herself from public shame. I admire Palin for what appears to be quite a stunning political career thus far, but I have a feeling she may get eaten alive in a similar way to Meirs.
Has anyone ever flat out turned down a request from a presidential candidate to be their VP?
Some of the secular blogosphere is realling teeing off on McCain for this one. For our fellow Americans who think beyond one or two issues, his choice of Palin simply seems confusing and naive at best, patronizing to women and dangerous at worst. If he really did this to court disenfranchised Hilary supporters, he really, really “doesn’t get it.”



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Robin Rhea

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:01 pm


I reject the notion that this is simply a patronizing pick for women. I am sure that appealing to women was part of the calculation, but she has appeal well beyond that political base. In terms of qualification for office, all of the following people were mentioned for VP: Sebelius (governor of Kansas) Tim Kaine, Mark Warner, Bobby Jindal, Mike Huckabee, and Chet Edwards. She has experience equal to, or almost equal to all of them and nobody claimed that they were patronizing attempts to get a voter group (though that certainly would have been PART of the calculation) She is as valid as any of them would have been.
I also want to get away from the idea that in order to be President you have to go to Harvard or Yale, be from a prominent family, spend your entire life advancing up the political ladder… we do not need more career politicians and she is a refreshing break from that… she is easily the closest thing to a regular person to run for office since at least Carter and before him I don’t know how far back you have to go to find someone similar.
Think about it
G.W.Bush – Yale and prominent family
Cheney-lifetime Republican operative
Clinton – Rhodes Scholar, Oxford (?), lawyer and 12 years as governor
Gore-father was a senator and lifetime senator
G.H.W.Bush – Yale and prominent political family
Reagan – several years in politics and gov. of California (might be somewhat regular, but he was a movie star)
Carter-not sure about his background
Ford-lifetime politician, Michigan All-American, VP
Nixon-lifetime politician, ran for President against Kennedy
Johnson-lifetime politician, lined his pockets with illegally obtained eminent domain property (his wife stole some of my family’s land so I am still a little frustrated)
Kennedy-Harvard, Kennedy family name and their illegally obtained fortune (bootlegging during prohibition)
I am not really good before Kennedy, but both Roosevelts came from prominent political families and went to Harvard
Palin is much closer to the model of politician you would have seen a hundred years ago (Lincoln) than the professionally groomed ones we have been accustomed to. I think that is a good thing.



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Phil

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:02 pm


I’ve got some family that lives in Alaska. They’re all fairly progressive in political perspective, yet they love this woman. I remember talking about Palin with them last year, and they kept going on about how “great” and “tough” she is in the political arena. Now that she’s the VP contender, I wonder what they’ll do?



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Phil

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:04 pm


Of course I meant to say that “I’ve got some family that live in Alaska.”



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Jeff Bailey

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:11 pm


Sarah Palin lived her convictions on her pro-life stand. That I admire tremendously.
I was lukewarm about John McCain before, though I was going to vote for him. Now I’ve just contributed to his compaign. He closed the sale for me.



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Ted

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:23 pm


Comment #15 – Is it coincidental that this would have been thought of by someone named “Cramer”? (couldn’t resist :)
I know only about Gov. Palin what I have read and heard today. But what I like about this entire campaign thus far is that the Obamas, the Bidens, the Palins, and the McCains seem to have great family strengths. McCain has taken ownership of the failure of his first marriage and said that it is his greatest mistake. Since I do not know any of these people and am not a qualified “stone thrower”, I want to believe their affirmations of commitment to their faith and their family until there is evidence otherwise that is beyond media and political accusations.
Yesterday in an interview here in Texas, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison said “There will be four very good people in the race. The issues will be clear and their proposed solutions different. America will have a clear choice and the voters will have to decide.”
Personally, I like that and hope the attack dogs are fenced for this one.



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Jon Rising

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:38 pm


Thumbs up!
And to those who are wringing their hands over her lack of experience — guess you won’t be voting for Obama, either.
Who are YOU left with — Bob Barr? Ralph Nader?
No hand wringing here. Thumbs up!



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Bryan L

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:47 pm


I haven’t read all of the comments (I stopped in the 50′s) but one of the things I find odd is that she is being praised for being so pro-life that she DECIDED to keep her child who has down syndome. She is being praised for making a decision that Obama and co thinks she should be able to make for herself and that her and McCain don’t think she should be able to make at all.
Anyone else find this odd and ironic?
Bryan L



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Mike K

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:55 pm


I think the choice of Palin was brave and certainly out of the box thinking by McCain and I applaud it. Still it smacks of trying to capitalize on the Hillary factor. While there were a lot of disgruntled Dems over it, I think McCain has overplayed his hand in thinking that these folks will come over to his ticket with the addition of Palin. While many Hillary supporters really wanted to see a woman in the Whitehouse I don’t think they want it bad enough to relinquish on abortion rights or a pro-NRA stand.
So short term I think Palin looks like a good choice but as the issues are vetted during the campaign I don’t think she can hold onto these voters that McCain is trying to capture.



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Andy Cornett

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:40 pm


I’m way late to the discussion today (out of pocket), but I don’t think this is an attempt by McCain to court Hillary-supporters. Palin is way different than Hillary, and if McCain thinks she’s draw Hillary’s votes then he’s just nuts. From what I’ve heard, most of them are aghast at his choice and think he chose her simply because she’s a woman – and that’s a huge turn off for them.
But I don’t think that’s the only reason he picked her. She’s most things that he is not: more socially and fiscally conservative, young, from everyday America, has the all-around story, executive – not legislative, more pro-oil, and yes – female. From the reactions I’ve seen, he picked her to give the younger (and stronger) conservatives a reason to get excited about his campaign. The democrats are unimpressed and plain fuzzled – the conservative “base” seems to be absolutely thrilled thinking they now have someone they can really get workin’ for.
I’m a novice at this, but make no mistake – I don’t think it was motivated at all by his trying to sway moderates or hillary supporters.



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Daniel

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:46 pm


I don’t think that the Palin pick is for Hillary folks as much as it is for the Pro-life folks.
This builds the confidence and excitement for the base. A lot of Republicans were voting for McCain simply because they didn’t want Obama. Now McCain has given them a reason to be excited about voting for him.



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Doug Allen

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:25 pm


In the last hour or so, some of the TV commentators have found interviews and comments by Republicans that Palin was a rising star in the GOP who might be ready for national politics by 2012 and possibly a presidential candidate by 2016. I think she has shown independence and done some gutsy things both politically and personally. On the other hand, I think many will question John McCain’s judgment. I do.



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Bill

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:30 pm


I don’t really understand some of the comments made. Perhaps I am mistaken but I think she is supposed to be a pretty strong Christian (at least she was leader of her Young Life group in high school and identifies herself still as a Christian. I am not necessarily saying that is a reason to vote for her….but some have questioned that. Please correct me if I am wrong. Also…I read that the issue with her brother in law was that he threatened to kill her father (and that led to some concerns because he is a highway patrol officer.) Again….maybe that is incorrect but I would expect a highway patrol officer to have problems if he threatened to kill anyone…let along a member of the Governor’s family. I agree, she is very inexperienced but I think she will be much tougher than people think. My feelings are mixed really.



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ChrisB

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:58 pm


Bryan, she’s being praised for taking the hard road when our society not only permits her to take the easy road, they encourage it and even look down on you for not taking it.



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josenmiami

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:38 pm


she seems nice enough … I don’t think this is a game winner for McCain necessarily.



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Jeff Bailey

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:39 pm


A very gracious congratulations to Palin from Hillary Clinton today. In sharp contrast to the totally classless attack on her from Obama.



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yarrrrr

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:11 pm


She is absolutely wonderful but I’m a little worried about experience. McCain should use her as someone who narratives and connects to the people while he is plays commander.



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banker

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:53 pm


When it comes down to it Christian conservatives will vote primarily Republican (or they won’t vote, but I don’t see that happening) no matter who the VP choice is.
The great thing about McCain is that he’s the candidate that can keep those disillusioned by the Republican party (via the Bush administration) in the fold, because of his reform stance. Palin doubles down on the reform ticket as a person who is conservative in all the good ways (pro-life, family, regular gal) but not neo-conservative in all the bad ways. I.E. she has stood up to her own party and big oil in Alaska.
Palin reminds the country that Obama doesn’t have a monopoly on change.



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Julie Clawson

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:53 pm


Well even if McCain didn’t mean for the pick to be pandering, the media coverage of the event has made it so. Typical headlines say “McCain picks Female” – as if her gender was all that matters.
I don’t know enough about her to really comment on the choice… but then again I doubt most voters will either. Sound bites and single issues seem to be the deciding factor as comments here have shown.



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Bryan L

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:00 pm


Chris,
So you are saying society looks down on her for not aborting her child? I think you may be overstating what society encourages and looks down on (especially since we don’t know what part of society she is surrounded and encouraged by).
Still the whole point is that she would rather have a society that doesn’t allow her that choice; that doesn’t make the decision hard since she wouldn’t have that decision at all anyway. She’s being praised for a choice she made when she doesn’t believe she should even have that choice. Maybe I’m the only one who sees it as ironic. Never mind then.
Bryan L



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Anna

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:05 pm


An exciting choice! My husband and I were Hillary Clinton supporters. We are entertaining the thought to vote for McCain now!



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jh

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:08 pm


As an independent leaning towards obama, I was pleasantly surprised at mccain’s choice.. theres alot to like about palin.. but came across her stance on environmental issues/oil/energy and it looks like she’s even more to the right then bush on that.. very disappointing..
Shouldn’t it be a very obvious for christians to be stewards of creation?? Why is this not part of the typical values that christians endeavor for in politics?



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Karen

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:15 pm


Whatever lead Obama had coming off the DNC has just been narrowed greatly. Very smart choice on McCain’s behalf. THe tears that many who grew up during the Civil Rights era shed over Obama, are now being shed over Palin by woman in neighborhoods throughout America.
In chess this would be “check”.



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Bry McClellan

posted August 30, 2008 at 6:35 am


What a bunch of septics today. Of course she was chosen because she was a woman but so what. A VP is always chosen to help bring a certain demographic to the ticket. Why do you think Obama chose Biden? It was to hush critics on the experience factor. Kennedy chose Johnson to bring the Southern vote and you can go right though the list of presidents who did the same. That being said she is probably a good choice. She is more conservative than McCain which will help appease the right wing of the Republican party. Many were going to sit this one out. They seem really fired up about this choice, including Dr. Dobson.



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Ruth Tucker

posted August 30, 2008 at 7:14 am


If the issue is coming down to who’s the sexiest V.P., I pick Joe in a heartbeat.



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Scott W

posted August 30, 2008 at 7:18 am


It’s ironic how ideology can trump religion.I was talking to my 79-year-old aunt last,who is a Christian traditionalist. She didn’t favor Palin because she’s a woman and didn’t think women should be in positions of authority over men. But conservative Christians and fundamentalists,at the behest of John McCain, who has an “iffy” Christian pedigree, are going to engage in the same kind of identity politcs they decry in liberals.
http://www.salon.com/opinion/kamiya/2008/08/29/sarah_palin_symbolism/



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tallandrew

posted August 30, 2008 at 8:40 am


Of the stuff I’ve read, the key points that have ben raise are that she is anti-abortion and pro-NRA. That seems to be enough for many evangelicals, although I have no idea what the NRA has to do with Christianity.
Also, what would James Dobson make of her? Yes – she’s pro-family in her values etc, but she will surely be spending less time with her family if she is VP!



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Bill

posted August 30, 2008 at 8:44 am


Actually, I saw James Dobson interviewed on television last night. He liked the selection of Sarah Palin. (I do not know if that will be helpful to her or not) but he was very pleased and said he had not been this excited about the election in quite some time.



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preacherman

posted August 30, 2008 at 9:52 am


Does he think American’s are that stupid.
It is nothing but a politicl ploy.
She has no experience in world politics.
Think about it.
Who would be a better Joe Biden make a better president or what’s her name…Oh yeah um…who is she again? :-)
I believe that it wasn’t John McCain’s decision to pick her. He has no passion in his speak yesterday. No excitement about his pick. I think it is nothing but a Hail Mery for the republicans.



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Jeff Bailey

posted August 30, 2008 at 12:00 pm


No. 111…..as opposed to all of Obama’s experience in world politics? To quote Hillary Clinton: Sen. McCain will bring a lifetime of experience to the campaign, I will bring a lifetime of experience….and Sen. Obama will bring a speech he gave in 2002.
Well said.



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Scott W

posted August 30, 2008 at 3:47 pm


I’m interested in what this choice by Sen. McCain says about his character. It’s well known that John McCain is a incessant gambler,one who engages in this behaviour for hours on end.(I’m interested in this not from a moral standpoint but from a psychological and personality standpoint.) This hasn’t received the attention that it should in the media,and it may be a window into the kind of leader he could get in this time when we need sober, measured decision makers.The following article paints a picture of both candidates from this vantagepoint.
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1819898,00.html



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Brian

posted August 30, 2008 at 8:11 pm


I think she’ll do fine – she stood up to a lot in AK and made it through – I also think it is cool she attends an Assemblies of God church in AK – at least – that’s the rumor.



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qb

posted August 30, 2008 at 8:59 pm


Preacherman (#111), good sir, your prejudices are showing.
How you can – with a straight face, apparently! – decry the #2′s lack of world experience while ignoring the very same deficiency in Democrats’ #1 is, well…
…truly chuckleworthy. And charming.
qb



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Peggy

posted August 31, 2008 at 12:18 am


Well, even though I’m late (but I did read every comment), I must say that months ago when I first heard Palin was being considered, something in my gut resonated immediately. I could not be happier!
Most of my reasons have been addressed already, but the Pacific Northwest is fired up about this, too!
And as I begin my second term as President of my son’s middle school PTSA, let me say that experience in the PTA can be worth more than many believe. And raising children and managing a household are nothing to sneeze at. I didn’t feel “pandered to” at all…and as I watched McCain’s introduction, and watched him as Palin gave her wonderful speech, I felt he was just doing his best to keep from bursting with pride.
The Rs needed an “everyman” and got an “everywoman” instead … but the result is the same: someone who is not an insider and got into politics to make a difference — as a servant. And saying “country first” is not as opposed to “God first” … it is as opposed to “me first”.
It will be interesting indeed…. 8)



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qb

posted August 31, 2008 at 9:28 am


The left-leaning folks here – which is to say, apparently, nearly everyone – might find Camille Paglia’s opinion interesting. Palin certainly has her attention. Check it out.
qb



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Darren King

posted August 31, 2008 at 11:24 pm


I agree with those who consider this a Hail Mary from McCain. I think he and his people realized they needed something out of left-field (or, in this case, right-field) to significantly change the tides (at least, hypothetically). I don’t think this will work though.
Let me also say that I find Palin’s apparent desire to see Creationism taught in schools – right alongside evolution – very troubling.
How about this: in science class, let’s teach science. Creationism is nothing of the sort. Besides, I firmly believe that when one reads the creation accounts in context (historically and literarily), it is clear that literal, six day creationism misses the point of the text. But again, that is in addition to the fact that Creationism is not science. If we want to debate six-day Creationism, let?s do it in Bible College, not right alongside biology and geology.
I do find Palin to be an honorable woman, someone of her word, and someone who stands up for what she believes in. And I would say this is, for the most part, also true for McCain. But this alone is not enough. Being about the right things is just as important as being able to stand for what you believe in. And from my perspective, speaking from my particular Christian worldview (and I admit it is one of many), we need the nuanced understanding of Obama.



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Cameron

posted September 1, 2008 at 4:29 pm


@Ginger (119)
Once again, somebody is unsure about her fitness to do the job because she is a woman with a young family. I agree with one point—her first priority must be her husband and children.
But Obama has school aged-children. I am yet to hear anyone say the same thing about him.



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Jeff Bailey

posted September 1, 2008 at 5:52 pm


Palin & Obama both have limited experience but since Obama is a man, his experience should count for more. Am I reading that argument from the Democrats correctly?



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Fred Harrell

posted September 1, 2008 at 11:05 pm


I have a friend who knows Alaska politics well… he says Joe Biden wants NO PART OF THIS WOMAN in a debate… I think Scot is right… the personality just showed up. She’s tough as nails, earthy and approachable, and can connect with a wide range of people. No bump from the DNC, a slight bump for McCain in the last few days. She needs to knock it out of the park this week with her speech, and I hear that is one of her strongest areas… should be interesting.



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Tom Hein

posted September 2, 2008 at 10:37 am


Mcain/Palin versus Obama/Biden…. wow… some of the most interesting politics coming up this fall that you will ever see. Almost as good as the start of football and deer huntiing season.



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Scot McKnight

posted September 2, 2008 at 3:11 pm


Everyone agrees, so it seems to me, that Palin’s daughter is off limits. So, I’m deleting any comment that mentions her. I’m sorry, but I have to do this. If she’s off limits, she’s off limits on the Jesus Creed.
I’m not fond of the comments about Palin’s competence as a mother in choosing to be part of the Republican ticket but they are within bounds for a discussion of a potential VP. But anything about her kids is off limits.



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Lewis

posted September 2, 2008 at 3:15 pm


Thanks, Scot. Good choice! =)



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Steve K.

posted September 2, 2008 at 3:16 pm


Scot,
I agree 100% with your decision to delete comments about Palin’s daughter.
However, what I think should NOT be “off limits” is discussion about what these events say about Palin, her leadership, and her position on policies. For example, the circumstances with her own family strongly undermine Palin’s firm “abstinence only” education stance, in my opinion. These are some of the issues that matter, and that is the stuff that should and, in fact, needs to be discussed.
Thanks.



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Scot McKnight

posted September 2, 2008 at 3:17 pm


Steve,
As long as her daughter is not mentioned.



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Faith J Totushek

posted September 2, 2008 at 8:56 pm


Does anyone sense a logical disconnect? The same crowd of which many support male only leadership in church and home celebrate McCain’s choice as VP. Don’t get me wrong, I think the Palin pick is great. But I am noting the disconnect and wonder how the conservative right works this out? Or don’t they?



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Bill

posted September 2, 2008 at 9:48 pm


Faith,
If that were my view (and it is not) I would assume the thought would be that in Timothy, Paul is talking about authority in the church not in secular establishments.



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Dave

posted September 4, 2008 at 12:34 am


As I write, it’s just a few hours after Palin’s acceptance speech in St. Paul. Here’s one conservative evangelical who was wowed by what he heard! Contrary to earlier posts in this thread, it’s obvious now that Sarah Palin is indeed a game-changer. She’s family-friendly, environmentally-conscious (hey, hunters are among the most respectful of all when it comes to protecting the environment, and she hunts moose!) a quick study on foreign affairs, and seems to have the capacity to bring her Christian faith to bear on who she is and what she believes, without being preachy in a political forum. Whatever appeal Obama/Biden had among evangelicals has probably seen its luster fade the last few days. It’ll be an interesting few months ’til November!



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Wes Ellis

posted September 4, 2008 at 3:10 pm


I find Palin’s polarizing affect very interesting. Just by reading the comments here it seems evident that McCain’s campaign may be made or broken by this decision. Many say they weren’t sure about McCain but now they are sold one way or the other by this choice. The conclusions are diverse. Some people have been sold to McCain because they like his choice others are sold away from him because they find his choice offensive.
I didn’t expect many people to think more of McCain because he chose Palin. In fact, I thought that his choice would be seen as exploitation; rashly picking a woman to get Hillary votes. That’s the way I interpret it anyway… I guess people like her on the ticket because it makes McCain look a little less identical to Bush but nevertheless Bush would still be Bush even if he had Superman (or superwoman) as his running mate and thus McCain is still Bush… I mean McCain… even with Palin on the ticket.



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