Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Obama’s Speech

posted by xscot mcknight

I’m wondering what your thoughts are on Obama’s acceptance speech? What did you like and what did you not like? As always on the Jesus Creed, civil remarks (and they can be appropriately critical) will be accepted.
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Jennifer

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:40 am


There was so much to like.
I had 2 favorite parts…
1. When he said something like : I want my daughters to have as much opportunity as your sons. I thought that had multiple layers of meaning…one of which is that he, a man, had beat out a woman to be in that spot, and yet, it was a nice way to say he supports opportuntiy for women.
2. His comments about how everyone involved in this election process loves America, and we all are trying to figure out what is best. It reminded me of some of the good “we all love Jesus, we just differ on this issue…” conversations. Which is a breath of fresh air from being told you dont really love the Lord if you hold X position.



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Ted M. Gossard

posted August 29, 2008 at 1:44 am


I thought it was good in a good number of ways. Like McCain’s will, it buys into the American myth. Too bad he had to use Scripture in the end, out of context, like he did. But other than that the ending was good.
I liked the way he brought in us walking together, invoking the Civil Rights era of which this is now such an historical moment and time. I hope in many ways, regardless who gets in, that we can get beyond the rift of the red and blue. And perhaps the best chance for that is with Obama. I’m glad for the direction folks like him in the Democratic party are going on the issue of abortion. I’m hoping affordable health care for everyone will be a priority of whichever the next administration will be. And he gave voice to that.



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Ted M. Gossard

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:45 am


I will say, though, that while I respect both Obama and McCain, I just can’t endorse either, myself. Though I’m glad for Christians working in both parties. I am leaning one way, and will continue to listen.



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Dan Brennan

posted August 29, 2008 at 4:48 am


I thought it was an incredible speech. I loved his forcefulness when he proclaimed, “Enough!” He showed a little bit more feistiness and directness that he will need against McCain. I think he exuded confidence and directly went after McCain’s strength.
I wished he would have spent a little more time on emphasizing the need to reduce unwanted preganancies. But then, he did a good job of htting the note of responsibility.
I think he’s ready to take McCain on.



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Ken Schenck

posted August 29, 2008 at 4:54 am


I appreciated his attempt to find common ground on issues like gun control, abortion, and immigration. He seemed authentic to me. To me, it was the most mature and substantial political speech I have ever heard in my lifetime. I found very little that I could disagree with as a Christian.



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Tony

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:17 am


I did not hear the speech … therefore, on the substance of the speech itself I cannot comment.
Nevertheless, America needs more than a speech–which is, in my opinion, all that Obama has. A speech, no matter how well crafted or presented, is still just a speech! Obama’s actions speak much louder … abortion (infantcide), ties with terrorists, total inexperience … etc. Let’s not be blinded by what he says that we forget what he’s done.
Obviously, McCain has his faults … but as far as being ready–and having more than a speech–he is way ahead of Obama.



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Scott W

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:31 am


The speech was masterful in that it laid out what the Obama phenomenon has been all about::galvanizing the yearning for a new direction for this country after the disastrous Bush years.It was about “us,” not about Obama. He was the one candidate who understood the times and had the right message and vision for this “kairotic” moment.



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Matias

posted August 29, 2008 at 5:49 am


zzzzzzzzzzzzzz…… honestly. His poise was impeccable, the venue was intriguing but the speech itself was a political speech with clever twists and at least two factually inaccurate remarks (if you go “line-by-line”) . When you have a hammer everything you see is a nail… semantic carvings and weavings.



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D C Cramer

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:18 am


Like Ted (#2) I found it unfortunate that he had to end with “Let us keep that promise ? that American promise ? and in the words of Scripture hold firmly, without wavering, to the hope that we confess.” Is Obama talking about holding firmly to Christ? Probably not. So, what, then, is the hope that we profess? The American Dream? I was with Obama until he had to throw in that line.
Also (not to be overly critical because I really did like many aspects of the speech), I hope that Obama lives up to what he said last night about civil disagreements by not smearing McCain throughout the rest of the campaign (and vice versa). It seems like double-speak to talk about having a civil exchange when those silly ads keep running about how many houses McCain has (or on the other side how Barack is a ‘rock star’). I feel like this political season will continue to see a mixture from both candidates between high brow civility and senseless smearing hardly worthy of WWF commercials.



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Nancy

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:19 am


Like Matias (#8) I found the content of Obama’s speech a snooze. It was disapointing after all the hype about him. And was filled with the usual campaign rhetoric.
That being said, I was moved to be able to witness the event in general. We have come a long way.



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Kristie B

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:27 am


Beautiful, in my opinion, and exactly the kind of speech I hoped he would make – it was personal and constructive and inspiring, it was critical of McCain’s policies but not of his compassion or patriotism. I’m amazed that we have a candidate with an actual platform – he has a concrete vision and a plan to carry it out. I was particularly impressed when he acknowledged and expressed understanding of people’s cynicism about Washington politics (“I get it” he said, and I think he does get it.) I know so many people who badly want to hope that Obama could bring about a good change, but their past experience with politicians making promises has left them jaded. Before Obama, I counted myself among them. But this time I’m allowing myself to hope. I actually trust this guy. Maybe I’m being naive – time will tell. But I’m convinced something is different this time.



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Rick in Texas

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:28 am


From the portions I heard, he made a lot of promises that any President is incapable of keeping. I actually thought the classiest thing I saw yesterday was McCain’s 30 second spot in which he said “Tomorrow we start again, but today, Senator Obama, you are to be congratulated.” That was real style. No promise, simply acknowledgement for an historic accomplishment. At the end was the usual “I approved this ad”, and for the first time ever, I thought to myself “Me too”.



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qb

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:41 am


There is nothing now to be said than has been said — by George Will, in his prospective look at the Obama acceptance speech. Once the insufferable fawning over Obama’s increasingly banal oratory has subsided (at last), all of our major global challenges will still remain, and Will calls him out on most of them.
Ever witty, lucid, and precise, Will has issued a devastating litany of observations about the Emperor’s clothes, or more accurately, the absence thereof. It is a deconstruction on both substance and style that cannot be easily dismissed as partisanship (those who know Will’s emerging legacy and extensive written history know that his icon, politically speaking, was a titan from the other side of the aisle, the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan). Will deserves a hearing, and Obama’s speech deserves to be evaluated against the sensible, proleptic standards Will sets forth in this column:
http://jewishworldreview.com/cols/will082808.php
qb



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josenmiami

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:43 am


I thought it was a good speech, although I am still very ambivalent about the elections. The one that really impressed me was Michelle.



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Gavin

posted August 29, 2008 at 6:55 am


Does no one realize that this man, Barack Obama, is the most radical candidate we’ve ever had in relation to abortion? Go check his record, watch his speech to Planned Parenthood last year (YouTube), watch the testimony given to Congress concerning the results of his rejection of a bill (3 times) that would have protected babies that were meant to have been aborted but instead were birthed. Obama speaks so passionately about protecting “the least of these.” Right. So many (liberal and emergent) Christians are telling me that I shouldn’t be a one-issue voter – that I shouldn’t be so narrow-minded. Do some investigation, people. Consider the times. Consider the value of a human life. Check his rhetoric with his record. THEN tell me I shouldn’t be a one-issue voter, as a Christian.



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Ben D.

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:03 am


I was very moved and impressed by it. I think Obama did what he needed to do… he got beyond just great rhetoric to policy issues and he proactively addressed just about every challenge that will come his way. He also set the stage for an issues-based, idea-based debate.
I appreciated his willingness to “address the tensions” on issues like abortion, gay rights, guns, etc. Well done.
This was a speech with both great vision and passion as well as concrete ideas and political pragmatism.
Whether you like him or not — or agree with him or not — this was an A+ speech and just what he needed.
Two side notes…
(1) what an amazing historical event! We have come a long way as a country and I will continue to pray that we will come even further….
(2) Whoever built the “set” did a great job. From TV, it did not feel like a stadium with 80,000 people… much more intimate and personal. That is also a job well done!



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Steve

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:11 am


none of us will ever face a bar set so high. this was a “bottom of the ninth, bases loaded” kind of moment for Obama.
So, was it a grand slam? some will say ‘yes’ and some ‘no’
Is anyone really going to argue that he “drove in some runs”?
MSNBC said it was “emotional and not at all like a laundry list?” I flipped to FOX and they were saying, “It did not illicit emotion and was like a laundry list.” So, the Right and Left have their opinions. I’m wondering how the undecided heard it?



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Curt

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:16 am


Gavin,
I can respect your view on Obama’s views on abortion but I have a question. How is preemptive war theory prolife? I definitely agree that an unborn child is a life worth protecting, but I struggle with other issues that seem to be just as much about the value of a human life. Is a prolife platform simply mean being opposed to abortion? From my perspective, I don’t see McCain or Obama representing a completely prolife platform. (I realize this is a tangent, but perhaps one we can entertain?) I’d like to hear some people’s thoughts on it.



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George D

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:24 am


The reality is Curt, from a practical policy perspective, Obama is probably the more “pro life” candidate.
In all likelihood, Roe will not be overturned no matter who wins. But with sound economic policies, fighting poverty, healthcare justice, etc, abortions will decrease far more under an Obama administration (imho) than a McCain one.
And your point on pre-emptive war is well taken. McCain is not a pro-life candidate in any way you can take seriously. McCain is anti-abortion, but not meaningly pro-life.
The truth?
Both Obama and McCain are anti-abortion.
The difference?
Obama thinks the answer is policies that reduce unwanted pregnancies, increase options for women, and help support young families and children.
McCain thinks the answer is Supreme Court Justices.
I am pro-life.
I am anti-abortion and consider it a major issue.
I am an evangelical Christian.
Therefore… I am voting for Obama-Biden.



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MatthewS

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:33 am


I thought the speech was delivered well. I am proud and happy for this evidence of forward movement for civil rights in our nation. Jim Lehrer’s (and guests’) discussion with Mondale about how far we’ve come was great. (If you didn’t watch PBS, Mondale played a role in mediating an ugly civil rights divide at a convention before I was born; he would not have believed at the time that he would be watching this convention).
Obama’s promises are far-reaching: end Iraq and find bin Laden in Afghanistan, end dependence on foreign oil, clean up the environment, curb Russian aggression, restore America’s moral authority, turn insurance companies into law-abiding entities that help people, tax breaks for the middle class, bring jobs back, find common ground on gay rights, abortion, gun rights. (I sat and took notes until the end, when I began snoozing)
I am worried about his handling of Stanley Kurtz’s research into his background; dismayed that he opposed a born-alive bill. I find this relevant because Obama speaks of finding common ground, perhaps even a third way. But does he live up to the promise?
To attack him as a person would be to sin against the JesusCreed; to listen, reason, research and then make a decision whether or not to trust and support him is in accord with being a responsible Jesus-follower.
Obama is an effective communicator. I admire/envy his ability. I do not judge him a terrible person. But he has not convinced me to trust him.



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Josh

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:56 am


I agree with Gavin (#15).
I listened to some of the speech but it was more of what I have heard all of his campaign. There is much that I totally agree with (especially as one who lost his job because it was imported to Mexico) in Obama’s platform. I have really tried to give him a chance after witnessing how Bush went straight to war after little attempt at foreign policy. It was just irresponsible and got us in the mess we are in now. Also, torture is an act this country (or any country) should ever particapate in.
THat being said, there is a difference in the Iraq war and the abortion issue. The Iraq war was started on pitiful evidence of WMD and was carried out with poor leadership. But is there any good in it? A brutal dictator has been taken down who committed genocide and the process of democritization has been started in an area of the world that severly needs democracy. If democracy succeeds it will have tremendous implications for peace in the Arab countries.
What is the end of abortion. A life never comes to be and a would-be mother has to live with her “choice” for the rest of her life. Where’s the good in that.
If Obama’s platform was a little more consistent on its love and respect for all humans I would be glad to cast my vote for him.



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Doug Allen

posted August 29, 2008 at 7:58 am


It was presidential and marks a continued movement of the Democratic party to the center. I’m a former Republican (from a Robert A. Taft conservative Republican family) now independent who has watched the Grand Old Party (the party of Lincoln) stray from its strengths: limited government and fiscal responsibility; personal freedom, opportunity, and responsibility. During the past several decades, rhetoric aside, while the Republicans have abandoned their strengths, the Democrats are morphing into the party of limited government, fiscal responsibility, and personal responsibility while still highlighting their tradition Democratic emphasis on mutual responsibility: a nation’s concern with the poor and disadvantaged.. I think Obama’s speech, but even more the record of recent Democratic administrations illustrates these changes. Sure, Obama was excessive in his promises and downplayed the theme of many of his other speeches on how difficult change will be requiring personal sacrifices by all of us. I wish Obama had challenged the Republican Party on their own “sacred” grounds, lower taxes, and pointed out that borrowing and spending is worse than taxing and spending because it is passing the buck. Not only does it irresponsibly increase the tax burden for the future, but it causes inflation (a tax on us all) and makes us indebted to those who don’t have America’s best interests at heart. I think the hallmark of Obama’s speech and campaign has been competency, something often lacking these past 8 years. Now it’s time for another patriot and public servant, John McCain, to have his turn. His criticisms of the Grand Old Party have, at times, been similar to my own, and possibly he can help return the GOP to its historic strengths. If I had one wish for both candidates it would be to emphasize the civility I think is their natural inclination and to not follow their advisers who will tell them (sadly, I think it’s usually true) that dirty politics wins elections.



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Mike K

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:03 am


Agree with Curt #17…we (Christians) have narrowly defined prolife as anti-abortion when I think it is so much broader than that as Curt so rightly points out…I do not defend abortion rights, however other policies that lead to war, poverty, and injustice can be so anti-life as to be akin to abortion. Are Iraqi civilians any less vulnerable than unborn children?



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Alice

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:13 am


I thought the speech was historic and beautiful; especially in light of the MLK speech anniversary. He had 40 minutes to try to live up to a billion different expectations … but in the end, my sense was he gave the speech HE wanted to give. That is integrity, in my mind.
I especially was pleased with the courage he showed by wading right into hot button issues without flinching, and while acknowleding honest disagreement, he offered a brief picture of a “third way.” Now, I know I’m going to get folks riled up by saying this, but this is my view … What if overturning Roe v. Wade is not the ONLY way to “fight abortion?” Really. What if working hard in multiple arenas … jobs, healthcare, education, minimum wage, affordable birth control, etc might be just as effective in reducing abortions as trying to come at this from a legislative angle?
Trust me, I do not want to turn this into one more argument about this one issue. But, I do grow weary of those who think there is only one way to be pro-life. Weary to the bone.
So, back to what I liked … he waded right into the issue of gun control, marriage, etc … acknowledged honest disagreement, and then very briefly started to paint the picture of a “third way.” To me, this kind of nuanced, high-level thinking about complex issues around which the American population has battled head on, only to find itself completely paralyzed, is perhaps the only way forward in this very diverse country. I deeply appreciate Obama’s intelligence on this.
I loved how he painted a picture of personal responsibility (the government can’t turn off the tv, or make a child do her homework) as well as governmental and policy empowerment.
I loved how he paid tribute to his mother and grandmother and the everyday heroes who have helped make him who he is today. I loved how he, with quite a bit of humor and not a small amount of macho, smacked down McCain’s attempt to make him into a celebrity.
Also, I stood up and cheered when he talked about a foreign policy focus that included intense diplomacy and the reinstatement of valuable partnership with our historic allies. ‘Nuf said.
I could go on, but these were just a few of my thoughts.
To then see grown men weeping in the stadium when the speech was over, especially some older African-American men … what a picture …



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WJY

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:22 am


Curt (#17), I agree with your remarks.
I would add further that Rom 13 and parallel writings in I Tim 2 and I Peter 2 give us the criteria for judging to what extent a state’s actions are subject to Christ’s reign. If the use of force is such as to protect the innocent and punish the evildoers, to preserve peace so that “all might come to the knowledge of the truth,” then that state may be considered as fitting within God’s plan. However, this positive evaluation cannot apply to a given state in all that it does, but at best in one case at a time, each time it chooses the best alternative rather than adding evil to evil.
To make short what could be a long explanation, the ultimate meaning of history is to be found in the work of the church. Non-violence (the church’s obedience to the self-giving love of God) is right in the deepest sense, not because it works, but because it anticipates the triumph of the Lamb that was slain.
Thanks.



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ChrisB

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:28 am


Sooo many things I’d like to say. (Actually, I’d love to respond to the speech line by line.)
Good: He said something few politicians (and fewer Democrats) say, that government can only do so much about education and that parents have to step up, turn the tv off, and tell their kids to do their homework.
Bad: His plans, where they are even possible, will cost tons of money. The only place he can get it is by sucking it out of a struggling economy.
Here’s some news for Democrats — corporations don’t pay taxes. If you raise their taxes they either trim operating costs (read, jobs) or raise prices to make it up.
Ugly: His use of 2 Cor 4:17-18 alarmed me. One, it’s a favorite passage I hate to see taken out of context for political use.
Two, his use of “the unseen” (eternal things in the passage) to refer to things government might accomplish for us in the future coincides with his earlier statement that “we can create a Kingdom right here on Earth.
No, we can’t.
If a Republican did that he’d get a smack down from the religous right. Unfortunately many on the religious left really think we can achieve the kingdom on earth by political means.



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ChrisB

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:35 am


Oh, one thing I found amusing:
as president, I will tap our natural gas reserves, invest in clean coal technology, and find ways to safely harness nuclear power. I?ll help our auto companies re-tool, so that the fuel-efficient cars of the future are built right here in America.
Wow, that’s a lot for one man to do — definitely not a 40 hour a week job. And when did he become a nuclear engineer? And a mechanical engineer? And a petroleum engineer?
I know, they all talk like this, but it’s patently ridiculous when they do it.



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Dan Brennan

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:59 am


#27. ChrisB,
Yes, the language is exaggerated. I think that’s part of navigating the civil terrain, though, don’t you think. We would not want a leader who could not “dream.” I think the rhetoric definitely can be a frustrating cause of talking past each other–given the fact that both parties want to reach out for the “undecided” vote. That vote is usually more in the middle rather than idealistic.



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jazztheologian

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:11 am


Scot,
I was able to attend the speech I couldn’t help but wonder how this connected with Martin Luther King’s promised land…I just posted about it…www.jazztheologian.com



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Crowm

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:18 am


First of all, it was great to see history (1st African American nominee in a major political party).
It was obvious Senator Obama is intellegent, passionate, and well-spoken. But did we hear anything different from this party this year? I don’t think so.
Healthcare for everyone, lower taxes for 95%, a college education for everyone, reduction in drilling oil…how is he going to pay for all of this?
Senator McCain has his own problems. My concern is when we trust in man to solve our problems, rather than trust in the One who allowed them status.



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Al Hsu

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:30 am


This isn’t about the speech itself, but one particular item I found very encouraging was in the video introduction. I loved seeing the family pictures, especially of the white grandparents with their biracial/black grandson. Whatever folks may think about Obama, his candidacy gives me hope that my own biracial children will grow up in a more civil and just society than existed 45 years ago.



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Nathan

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:34 am


Re: Scripture out of context…
that’s a grand political tradition…
I just wonder if people also got bent out of shape with the implicit theological twisting of “city on a hill” language?



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Rick

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:40 am


Nathan #32-
So then it’s ok to do?



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Jennifer

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:50 am


Rick,
What is the difference between scripture being “out of context” and scripture being used to add another layer of meaning to a new context.
I think of Jesus’ use of the Jonah story. He says that his death and resurrection will be like Johan, 3 days in the belly of a whale. Is that out of context? or is it bringing a new layer of meaning?



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Rick

posted August 29, 2008 at 10:57 am


Jennifer #34-
It does not appear that is what Nathan was referring to in #32. He was talking about political tradition.



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ADHunt

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:00 am


I agree with those who say that pro-life is not limited to anti-abortion. I thought the speech was typical of Obama, neither more profound nor less than most that he gives. And although I am not the biggest fan of going down harsh on McCain, I think that it is inevitable at this stage of the game. Especially given what Republicans did to Kerry. You simply have to respond quickly and forcefully to attack ads or you go down.
I greatly appreciated his reaching out to those who disagree with him. I have never once gotten the feeling that Senator Obama was anything but bracingly honest. You saw him defend his position on Roe vs Wade at a Baptist church right?
I know that “Scripture was used out of context” but can any honest person here say they haven’t heard a thousand sermons that do much worse? Seriously



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Sam Andrress

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:09 am


You mean we are really going to have a President who speaks in complete sentences? This is too good to be true.



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Mike K

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:32 am


Re: Scripture out of context?
that?s a grand political tradition?
Wait a minute…didn’t some of the NT writers use passages from the OT out of context too? Can’t remember them off the top of my head but I remember reading NT passages that were taken from the OT and they were clearly not within the context of the original OT passage.



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Rick

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:39 am


Mike K #38-
Interesting that you equate the NT writers with modern politicians.



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My 2 Cents

posted August 29, 2008 at 11:49 am


Steve #17, ummm, the Cubs DID hit a grand-slam home run right at about 3/4 of the way through the Obama speech! I had trouble focusing at that point. I saw a headline this morning stating: goodbye to the south. The candidates are no longer of the old south. There is a wind of change…and I thought there were moments of inspiration in the speech last night. I listen to my coworkers and they are all wanting inspiration desperately. They want to hear what he is saying.



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Scott Lenger

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:15 pm


James K.A. Smith’s post, …the same old religion, echoes exactly my thoughts.
I’ll only add that the “find Obama and take him out!” language sounded eerily similar to the tough-guy language of the last eight years and the talk about bringing overseas jobs back home seems to be more concerned with what people wanted to hear than an concern for what might really benefit both Americans and developing nations.



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Billy Kangas

posted August 29, 2008 at 12:38 pm


He mentioned a number of ?universal values? we can ?all agree? on stating, ?We may not agree on abortion, but surely we can agree on reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies in this country.? Although I personally agree with him there, I know a number of Catholics who would be very wary of signing onto that mission.
I write more on this here
http://orant.blogspot.com/2008/08/senator-barack-obama-on-faith-and.html



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ChrisB

posted August 29, 2008 at 1:06 pm


Billy, notice he said reduce “unwanted pregnancies” not “abortions.” The DNC removed that bit about making abortions “rare” from their platform — much to the glee of pro-abortion (there is no other term for these folks) activists who wanted to discard any notion that abortion was any less legitimate a choice than birth.



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Ted M. Gossard

posted August 29, 2008 at 2:30 pm


Chris B. #26,
Actually Ronald Reagan was a master of mixing the American myth with a cultural Christianity, or secularlism and a cultural Christianity. I’m afraid the Republicans get away with just as much with the religious right, as long as they back their agenda.



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sheryl

posted August 29, 2008 at 3:05 pm


Sorry, I haven’t read all the comments. Please accept my apologies!
This has been a historic week for our country with an African-American nominated as the President of the US, and a female nominated as the VP. Wow.
Speaking on the 45th anniversary of MLK Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, I was shocked he did not make more reference to it than at the end. That was a bit anti-climatic.
Overall, as a speech it was okay. The speech did not seem to be an acceptance speech for the nomination of a major party, but rather a combination of a stump speech and a mini State of the Union address–with a laundry list of initiatives and no mention of how these initiatives will be accomplished. It was no different than any other Democratic stump speech I’ve heard. Obama spent too much time attacking McCain and appearing mad, even angry. He appeared very arrogant at times. Unfortunately, those were stuck out for me.
He has the rhetorical skills no doubt. There were a few memorable moments (the repeat from his 2004 speech about the UNITED States of America), but I think the speech fell flat. Maybe it was the hype and high expectations. The venue was breathtaking, but it seemed the crowd was “taken out of the game” with his verbal, angry missives at McCain, rather than courting Undecided voters and introducing himself to the American people.



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Ken

posted August 29, 2008 at 4:33 pm


He delivered his speech very well. The fireworks and music following it were too much for me – a little too self-congratulatory and epic.



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Rusty

posted August 29, 2008 at 8:40 pm


The good – outlined his plans, passionate, called McCain out, tried to build bridges to unify Americans, included thousands to come watch who weren’t delegates, and showed millions that Dr. King’s dream has come true.
The bad – still have no idea of how he will make things
happens (after watching speeches and 3 debates against Hillary), thought he should have talked more about Dr. King’s dream being realized, told McCain he was ready for debates while avoiding all of them besides the 3 mandatory.
Overall a big win for Obama.



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Dave

posted August 29, 2008 at 9:04 pm


Let’s face it, politicians, ,that’s all they are, full of hot air and very little else, I for one am not convinced by the windbags who run for government office. Speeches aside, let’s see a politician actually have the guts to do something right in office, and not just to please people or gain power. Won’t ever happen. I remain the skeptic and will vote accordingly.



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preacherman

posted August 30, 2008 at 9:56 am


I believe his speech was motivating. Inspiring. It was the best speech I have ever heard from a politician. I love how he told McCain that all American’s put America first. That there is no blue or red states that there is the United States.
He was extremely presidental.
I also enjoyed how he challenge Americans to pick up the responsibilty. He said, “The government can’t turn off the television and make the kids do their homwork. Men need to take responsiblity for their families.” Wonderful. Amen!
He did a fantastic job.
President Obama…Sounds wonderful doesn’t it.



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Bry McClellan

posted August 30, 2008 at 10:00 am


He hit all of the democratic talking points which can be summed up in one line. The Republicans are evil and everything thing will be great if we I am elected. We have all heard this a thousand times but he presented them with such elegance that He all most convinced me.



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Bry McClellan

posted August 30, 2008 at 10:03 am


He hit all of the democratic talking points which can be summed up in one line. The Republicans are evil and everything thing will be great if I am elected. We have all heard this a thousand times but he presented them with such elegance that He all most convinced me.



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More Blogs To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Jesus Creed. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:15:58am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Our Common Prayerbook 30 - 3
Psalm 30 thanks God (vv. 1-3, 11-12) and exhorts others to thank God (vv. 4-5). Both emerge from the concrete reality of David's own experience. Here is what that experience looks like:Step one: David was set on high and was flourishing at the hand of God's bounty (v. 7a).Step two: David became too

posted 12:15:30pm Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Theology After Darwin 1 (RJS)
One of the more important and more difficult pieces of the puzzle as we feel our way forward at the interface of science and faith is the theological implications of discoveries in modern science. A comment on my post Evolution in the Key of D: Deity or Deism noted: ...this reminds me of why I get a

posted 6:01:52am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Almost Christian 4
Who does well when it comes to passing on the faith to the youth? Studies show two groups do really well: conservative Protestants and Mormons; two groups that don't do well are mainline Protestants and Roman Catholics. Kenda Dean's new book is called Almost Christian: What the Faith of Ou

posted 12:01:53am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Let's Get Neanderthal!
The Cave Man Diet, or Paleo Diet, is getting attention. (Nothing is said about Culver's at all.) The big omission, I have to admit, is that those folks were hunters -- using spears or smacking some rabbit upside the conk or grabbing a fish or two with their hands ... but that's what makes this diet

posted 2:05:48pm Aug. 30, 2010 | read full post »




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