Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Jesus Creed goes to China

posted by xscot mcknight

This week we got a nicely wrapped package from Paraclete, and inside the package was two copies of Jesus Creed … in Chinese. Here’s a picture and then a calculation:
img_0464.JPG
Now the calculation. If there are 70 million Christians in China, and only half of them buy Jesus Creed, I’ll start catching up with Rick Warren and Tim LaHaye! 8)



Advertisement
Comments read comments(22)
post a comment
Andrew

posted June 27, 2008 at 6:15 am


Is it being published in Taiwan/Hong Kong or will there be an edition in simplified Chinese characters (this cover uses traditional, not very widely used on the mainland anymore)? Just curious. I remember when I was studying at Tsinghua University in Beijing the neighborhood bookstore carried “Purpose Driven Life” and even featured it rather prominently. It’s great to know your work will be available there too, that it would encourage Christ’s followers in all nations to follow him more closely.



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted June 27, 2008 at 6:21 am


Andrew,
I don’t know anything about the characters, of course. I was wondering if our Chinese readers would comment on spelling, etc.. Can you tell me more what you mean?



report abuse
 

Philip

posted June 27, 2008 at 6:35 am


Is this version available to buy in the states? If so, where? My sister is getting ready to move to China and I would love for her to have a copy. If not I guess she can get one there :)



report abuse
 

Andrew

posted June 27, 2008 at 6:46 am


Well, I’m not a native speaker, but I’ll give it a shot. :) The Chinese government simplified most of the characters after the revolution in 1949 for a number of different reasons. Giving them the benefit of the doubt, the aim was to encourage literacy by making characters easier to read and write. Reading Mao’s literature talks in Yenan from WWII it seems like he also wanted to sever the link between the “New China” and what he considered feudal literary forms, including traditional orthography. Since Taiwan and Hong Kong/Macao didn’t go along with the “reforms”, there are effectively two different ways of writing Chinese, though in my experience as an American more comfortable with traditional characters, people who can read one version can almost always read the other, though knowing how to write with both just uses a little too much brainpower.
In any case, the text has been translated literally as: Yesu Xinjing (Jesus Creed), and then in the red box, read left to right, “ai shen, ai ren” (love God, love others).



report abuse
 

Sarah

posted June 27, 2008 at 7:54 am


That is cool, Scot. You (and China) will take over the world some day! :) Congratulations!



report abuse
 

Heidi Renee

posted June 27, 2008 at 9:42 am


Exciting! I just sent the link to my friend in Hong Kong who pastors a church there of about 10,000. He’ll be thrilled to have access to such an amazing resource!



report abuse
 

Wonders for Oyarsa

posted June 27, 2008 at 11:51 am


In any case, the text has been translated literally as: Yesu Xinjing (Jesus Creed), and then in the red box, read left to right, ?ai shen, ai ren? (love God, love others).
Technically, wouldn’t that be “love God, love man”?



report abuse
 

Wonders for Oyarsa

posted June 27, 2008 at 11:53 am


Technically, isn’t it actually “love God, love man”?



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted June 27, 2008 at 12:05 pm


Here’s something I have learned:
The name of the publisher is Sino Language Consultant Co., Ltd.
http://www.iepay.net.tw.
Jon Sweeney, at Paraclete Press, also said that Christian books are often available only from churches or the underground.



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted June 27, 2008 at 12:08 pm


WoO,
Subtitle for Jesus Creed is “Loving God, Loving Others.”



report abuse
 

Peggy

posted June 27, 2008 at 12:18 pm


Scot,
I am thrilled for your book to get into China. The powerful and simple message it gives will find an exceptionally warm reception there.



report abuse
 

tc robinson

posted June 27, 2008 at 12:35 pm


Congrats, Scot!



report abuse
 

RJS

posted June 27, 2008 at 12:39 pm


I think WoO is refering to the fact that Ren is usually translated “man” or what I’ve seen is “people” not others. Although I know so little Chinese I could easily be wrong.



report abuse
 

Wonders for Oyarsa

posted June 27, 2008 at 1:21 pm


RJS is correct (though my “three letter acronym” is WfO, rather that WoO – which would imply “Wonders OF Oyarsa” which would be a little pretentious).
“ren” means “man” in the “inclusive” sense of people or mankind or person. With translation, you often have to phrase things in a way that sound different when “re-translated” – it’s not an exact science. In this case, I kind of like the sound of the re-translated subtitle: “love God, love man” – it has a primal, elemental ring to it.



report abuse
 

L.L. Barkat

posted June 27, 2008 at 3:11 pm


Beautiful thing! Congratulations (to you too…. for perhaps the first congratulations go to the new blessed readers. : )



report abuse
 

Andrew

posted June 27, 2008 at 3:58 pm


Wonders for Oyarsa makes the correct point. The first thing I thought of though when I saw “airen” was the meaning of ‘spouse’ that it normally has.
And of course, using “shen” for God is just inviting a repeat of the names controversy…though using shangdi would certainly not have the necessary ring to it here. ;)
Mr. McKnight, I think you’re right about the limited availability of Christian books. To purchase my Bible and hymnal in Beijing I had to go to the Three-Self church or the YMCA. Some illegal book vendors sell pirated copies of just about anything though, even the Bible.



report abuse
 

Ranger

posted June 27, 2008 at 7:55 pm


I live in China and whereas traditional characters aren’t used by the common man, in the news, on signs, etc., they are almost exclusively the preferred characterization in the TSPM church, which is the government church. As such, most Christian books at the TSPM bookstores are written in traditional characters. I’m an American, and only read simplified characters, but whenever I attend the TSPM church or try to read traditional characters it’s not too hard to guess what they have been simplified to…they are really similar.
On another note, I’m glad that my Chinese friends can now read this work. I’ll definitely suggest it to them…some books don’t translate well into eastern thinking, but I think this one should!



report abuse
 

pat

posted June 28, 2008 at 8:43 am


Congratulations! That’s terrific news!



report abuse
 

Edmund

posted June 28, 2008 at 1:13 pm


Scot, congratulations on your JC book in Chinese! I am a native Chinese living in Toronto. Just by looking at the cover and publisher, it seems that your book is translated into Traditional Chinese characters, which is commonly used in Hong Kong and Taiwan. The publisher SINO is located in Taiwan and they are currently translating Bishop Wright’s “For Everyone” series or some other works of his.
As for the subtitle, it is correctly translated as “Love God, love man”, so don’t worry ;-)



report abuse
 

Edmund

posted June 28, 2008 at 1:24 pm


Sorry, maybe I should explain a bit more: the character “ren” can denote “man” (male) or “person” depending on the context. The phrase “Love God, love ren” is actually well-known among Chinese Christian circle as the short-form of Jesus’ great commandment.



report abuse
 

Anna

posted June 30, 2008 at 1:37 pm


Scott & all,
The Chinese character “Ren” is an inclusive term for both “woman” and “man” and does not have any specific gender connotations (unlike the generic term “man” in English). If you want to refer exclusively to “man,” use “Nan(male) Ren;” if you refer exclusively to “woman,” use “Nu (female) Ren.” So “Ai Shen, Ai Ren” should be translated as “Love God, Love People.”
I am a Chinese Christian in the US and am originally from Mainland China. I am presently a seminary student. I enjoy your postings alot!
Anna



report abuse
 

Anna

posted June 30, 2008 at 2:09 pm


If refer to “others” (other people), use “Bie (other) Ren.” But in this case, “Ai Ren” has the connotation of “loving others.”



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More Blogs To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Jesus Creed. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:15:58am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Our Common Prayerbook 30 - 3
Psalm 30 thanks God (vv. 1-3, 11-12) and exhorts others to thank God (vv. 4-5). Both emerge from the concrete reality of David's own experience. Here is what that experience looks like:Step one: David was set on high and was flourishing at the hand of God's bounty (v. 7a).Step two: David became too

posted 12:15:30pm Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Theology After Darwin 1 (RJS)
One of the more important and more difficult pieces of the puzzle as we feel our way forward at the interface of science and faith is the theological implications of discoveries in modern science. A comment on my post Evolution in the Key of D: Deity or Deism noted: ...this reminds me of why I get a

posted 6:01:52am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Almost Christian 4
Who does well when it comes to passing on the faith to the youth? Studies show two groups do really well: conservative Protestants and Mormons; two groups that don't do well are mainline Protestants and Roman Catholics. Kenda Dean's new book is called Almost Christian: What the Faith of Ou

posted 12:01:53am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Let's Get Neanderthal!
The Cave Man Diet, or Paleo Diet, is getting attention. (Nothing is said about Culver's at all.) The big omission, I have to admit, is that those folks were hunters -- using spears or smacking some rabbit upside the conk or grabbing a fish or two with their hands ... but that's what makes this diet

posted 2:05:48pm Aug. 30, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.