Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Weekly Meanderings

posted by xscot mcknight

Chicago Spring means spotting Baltimore Orioles and the morning dance of birds:
orioles.jpgdance-of-birds.jpg
Evangelical renaissance?
Only God.
A lower case friend of mine points us to this: and it is cool.
Angry young men.
Good confession and a prayer for healing from us.
Been fishing?
fishing.jpg
Speaking of fishing … one of our pastor’s wisdom writers who loves to fish, Rob Merola, continued his post on his own blog. So did David Fitch.
I’m sure some pastors can find a great analogy or illustration in this story. Any come to mind immediately?
Here’s a book deal on Jason Boyett’s Pocket Guide. Only 6.99 per book.
Michael Kruse has a potent little chart posted about the growth of religious adherence in the USA.
Very thoughtful piece by Ed Gilbreath.
Karen doing good for the victims of war.
Your youth minister needs to see this listing by Marko.
Some of our students biking for justice.
A truth-teller.
Xenophobia in South Africa.
One in our blog community has just finished blogging about another in our blog community — about his book.
1. A question for pastors.
2. Summer jobs … many youngsters are struggling to find one.
3. Gotta love this one.
4. Elite teens struggling to find time for lunch.
5. Thabo Mbekei speaks about xenophobia unrest.
6. Wow, maybe the longest political rant I’ve ever listened to: Keith Olberman on Hillary Clinton.
7. Tribune links don’t always last, but I hope this one does: some Midwest States are working on legislation to protect the water in the Great Lakes.
8. Has anyone read this book? Any thoughts?
9. This deserves to be higher and I’ve run out of space, and Eugene will forgive me (I hope), but his paragraph of misspellings is priceless.
10. Tamara Buchan, at Missio Lux, has some great missional work going on.
Sports:
The Cubs, in the simplest of terms, are the best. B-E-S-T
Big concern.
One of the good things about the arrival of summer is that it seems soccer seasons (finally and relievingly) end all over the world. How grown adults can play for 90 minutes, have a score of 0-0, and end it all by goal kicks is beyond me. It’s like a baseball game ending with two pitchers on the mound seeing who can throw the most strikes in a row or a tie golf match ending with a putting contest. End the game playing the real game.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(21)
post a comment
RJS

posted May 31, 2008 at 6:51 am


The CNN article Study to crack evangelical stereotypes is interesting. Like most news reports I could quibble with many of the individual statements – but the overall sentiment is good. I hope that the study will help to break the stereotype – at least highlighting evangelical scholars.
It is interesting though – I wonder how they will define and locate evangelical scholars. In most areas of academic endeavor religious point of view need never come up, and for many it never does come up.
The last two paragraphs are particularly interesting – A prospering intellectual culture in evangelicalism will require engaging fairly with those who disagree. It will also require being willing to express thoughts honestly and openly while thinking through the faith and its expression and implication. Faith statements at many evangelical colleges will prevent true evangelical scholarship from flourishing in these environments. In general scholars are not only required to affirm the historic Christian faith ? but are also required to affirm more limited cultural interpretations of the Christian faith. Fear of job security then severely limits intellectual growth. A prospering evangelical intellectual culture will have to come in large part from scholars in more secular environments, an environment not without pitfalls and shortcomings of its own.
The last statement is the biggest indictment of evangelical scholarship: “It’s when you view your tradition with such confidence that you want to offer it to others … that’s when you’ve made it,” Wolfe said. “I don’t see evangelicals having that pride in their own tradition, yet.” This one hits where it hurts ? and I say that from personal experience.



report abuse
 

Terry Tiessen

posted May 31, 2008 at 7:53 am


Lovely bird pictures, Scot. What do you shoot them with?



report abuse
 

J

posted May 31, 2008 at 8:58 am


Scott – I know you did a series on the book a while back and this may all be common knowledge within the field but I thought you and the community would find this piece in the Chronicle interesting – The Betrayal of Judas.



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted May 31, 2008 at 9:58 am


RJS,
Very insightful; I had some of these thoughts as I read it.
Terry,
Well, I’ve said this before … I don’t take these pictures. I swipe them from the internet.



report abuse
 

Andie Piehl

posted May 31, 2008 at 10:19 am


It’s hard to quit playing with the Visuwords, Scot. You are so right; it IS cool!



report abuse
 

julie

posted May 31, 2008 at 2:09 pm


Scot,
We had a baltimore oriole fly into our back yard, actually near our hummer feeder. It is the first time I have seen one. I think they migrate through and we probably won’t see another one. It was awesome.
Julie



report abuse
 

John Frye

posted May 31, 2008 at 2:24 pm


Hey, Scot.
Thanks for linking Ted Gossard’s review of *Out of Print: A Novel.* I appreciate the exposure to the Jesus Creeders.
John



report abuse
 

Danny

posted June 1, 2008 at 11:54 am


Scot, the soccer is finally really starting now! The European cup is starting in a few days – the best soccer (actually called football over here) players in the world



report abuse
 

RJS

posted June 1, 2008 at 12:56 pm


Real fans know that the only important sport is Hockey – reaching its climax just now. Go Wings. Now we have the Best.



report abuse
 

Teresita

posted June 1, 2008 at 2:59 pm


I wonder how they will define and locate evangelical scholars.
Did you know there were evangelical Catholics, who “rejoice in being able to feed at both the table of the Eucharist and from the sacred text” ? So the answer to your query would be to enlarge somewhat from the current definition of an evangelical from a Protestant tradition who has a conservative inerrantist view of the bible. Then spread your net to draw true scholars, not merely those who have a degree in scripture memorization, which is what they hand out in the madrasses in Saudi Arabia.



report abuse
 

Dianne P

posted June 1, 2008 at 7:08 pm


Oh RJS, Hockey? Hockey? “A fight waiting for a sport to break out”?
Just when you think you’ve started to know someone, just a little bit. And I’ve enjoyed your posts so much. Hockey. Hmmmmm. I think I have to spend some time sitting with this one. Sigh.



report abuse
 

RJS

posted June 1, 2008 at 7:50 pm


Dianne P
I grew up on a lake in Minnesota – we had a rink shoveled in our “backyard” from freeze to thaw. Hockey all winter, baseball all summer. What is soccer?



report abuse
 

eugene

posted June 1, 2008 at 11:12 pm


scot,
anytime i get on the weekly meanderings, i bust out a six pack and celebrate.



report abuse
 

Dianne P

posted June 1, 2008 at 11:33 pm


RJS,
OK, I’m with you on the soccer thing, and I have to admit that I loved watching live hockey at college, yet…. professional hockey leaves me (dare I say??) COLD. But then I boycotted professional (not college) basketball for some time, so admit that I can’t truly judge a sport based on how the pros play.
I grew up in Cleveland watching the Indians (go Tribe!!!) and spent 25 adult years in Chicago (Wrigley Field anyone?). To me, it’s all about baseball, then a 3-way tie for basketball, volleyball and football in no particular order.
Guess that I can agree that the sport that we watched in our youth has hard-wired our brains in a way that endures. And that tells me that God is a sports fan!!! He has given us such joy and enthusiasm and pleasure and heartbreak surrounding our love of sport. And like all of His magnificent creation, there is enough variety (baseball, volleyball, even hockey) to go around for everyone.
So Scot, what’s your fav (aside from baseball (Lukas) and basketball (you)?
And RJS, do the Twins have your heart in the summer? And where do the Vikings and ‘Wolves fit in? Man, this is complicated!



report abuse
 

RJS

posted June 2, 2008 at 4:13 am


Twins definitely – and Vikings.



report abuse
 

Jeremy

posted June 2, 2008 at 10:26 am


Ah! The beautiful game of soccer. The world has set the US free with this gorgeous game. :)
Ties games are ended with penalty kicks rather than goal kicks.



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted June 2, 2008 at 10:30 am


Ah, Jeremy, yet another problem: how can it be called “penalty” kick? What’s the penalty, not scoring?



report abuse
 

Jeremy

posted June 2, 2008 at 11:27 am


NICE! LOL



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted June 3, 2008 at 1:39 am


Tuesday: Theology and Ministry catch up from around the world « Chris Kidd – applied youth ministry

[...] Angry young men: interesting interview of Michael Currie (Doing Anger Differently)? in TIME.? Currie chats with TIME about the turbulent inner world of the adolescent boy.? (Thanks Scot). [...]



report abuse
 

Bob Arnet

posted June 3, 2008 at 6:26 pm


Scot, Having the duty of supervising many soccer matches this spring, I think ending tie scores with penalty kicks is great because with regular overtime, we’d be watching many more minutes of scoreless play!
Bob



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted June 4, 2008 at 12:18 pm


Wednesday: Children?s and youth work links « Chris Kidd – applied youth ministry

[...] Angry young men: interesting interview of Michael Currie (Doing Anger Differently)? in TIME.? Currie chats with TIME about the turbulent inner world of the adolescent boy.? (Thanks Scot). [...]



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More Blogs To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Jesus Creed. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:15:58am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Our Common Prayerbook 30 - 3
Psalm 30 thanks God (vv. 1-3, 11-12) and exhorts others to thank God (vv. 4-5). Both emerge from the concrete reality of David's own experience. Here is what that experience looks like:Step one: David was set on high and was flourishing at the hand of God's bounty (v. 7a).Step two: David became too

posted 12:15:30pm Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Theology After Darwin 1 (RJS)
One of the more important and more difficult pieces of the puzzle as we feel our way forward at the interface of science and faith is the theological implications of discoveries in modern science. A comment on my post Evolution in the Key of D: Deity or Deism noted: ...this reminds me of why I get a

posted 6:01:52am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Almost Christian 4
Who does well when it comes to passing on the faith to the youth? Studies show two groups do really well: conservative Protestants and Mormons; two groups that don't do well are mainline Protestants and Roman Catholics. Kenda Dean's new book is called Almost Christian: What the Faith of Ou

posted 12:01:53am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Let's Get Neanderthal!
The Cave Man Diet, or Paleo Diet, is getting attention. (Nothing is said about Culver's at all.) The big omission, I have to admit, is that those folks were hunters -- using spears or smacking some rabbit upside the conk or grabbing a fish or two with their hands ... but that's what makes this diet

posted 2:05:48pm Aug. 30, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.