Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Prayer for the Week

posted by xscot mcknight

Grant us, O Lord, to trust in you with all our hearts; for, as you always resist the proud who confide in their own strength, so you never forsake those who make their boast of your mercy; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.
Proper 18



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cas

posted September 9, 2007 at 9:42 am


What is Proper 18 Scot? This one seems more modern than most. Amen, nonetheless.



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Steve Furse

posted September 9, 2007 at 1:41 pm


I realize I just wandered in here, but I too want to know what Proper 18 is. The prayer itself didn’t seem too bad, but the reference has me confused.



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Ted M. Gossard

posted September 9, 2007 at 2:01 pm


cas,
I’m curious as to what you think is modern about this prayer. Also, though modernism is at heart an idolatrous substitute for the gospel and the story of God, like postmodernism (in a nihilistic sort of way is postmo, I take it), is there not good, true elements found in both mo and postmo?
But I really see nothing of this sort objectionable in this prayer, but find it to be scriptural and true to God’s story.
Just wondering and thinking out loud.



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cas

posted September 9, 2007 at 4:37 pm


Ted,
I just meant that language sounded contemporary, and I didn’t know what Proper 18 meant.
We prayed this same prayer as part of the Anglican liturgy in church this morning, so I assume it is my mistake.
I agree with your statement that there are good elements in both modernism and postmodernism.
blessings, christine



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Ted M. Gossard

posted September 9, 2007 at 5:29 pm


Christine, You make a good point there.
This is the contemporary version (1979?) and you can find an older version on both sites of BCP on Scot’s sidebar.
Sounds like you know more about this than I do.



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Scot McKnight

posted September 9, 2007 at 5:32 pm


Proper refers to the “proper” prayer for this Sunday in Ordinary Time in the Church calendar.
This is the 15th Sunday after Pentecost, but its also the 23rd Sunday of Ordinary Time or Proper 18.



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cas

posted September 9, 2007 at 5:53 pm


Thanks Ted and Scot. I need to take advantages of the resources on the sidebar and buy Praying with the Church. I bought the Book of Common Prayer, but haven’t been able to figure out how to use it.



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Scott Eaton

posted September 9, 2007 at 8:35 pm


Scot,
Thank you for sharing these beautiful and reverent Anglican prayers with us. They challenge me as well as bless me.
Thanks!



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Jon

posted September 9, 2007 at 9:41 pm


The BCP is mostly not that complicated. Firstly, if you’re using it as a source of prayers for private devotions there is no such thing as a wrong way to use it, although that mostly isn’t the purpose for which it was written. It was written to provide something like a blueprint for how to do the most common worship services of the Episcopal Church along with all the resources (other than the readings from the Bible) that a person would need to do a service. The place to start with the BCP is probably deciding what sort of prayers you want to say. Then look at the table of contents. There are a couple different versions of prayer services (sets of prayers and psalms) for both mornings and evenings, a short prayer service for use around noon, a prayer service called compline for use just before going to bed, and lists of prayers both for seasons, special days, remembrance of saints, and special events (the Collects) and for specific sorts of things like the church, society personal life, and the world (the Prayers and Thanksgivings section). There are also two different lectionaries for those who want to organize how they read the bible. Depending on which lectionary one uses one can wind up reading a rather large chunk of the Bible every 2 or 3 years.
There is normally an explanation in italics of what the section is about at the beginning of the section, and italics in the course of a service are basically stage directions for the service.
Of course the best way to start figuring out how to use the book is probably to visit the closest Episcopal Church some Sunday and both see how the BCP is used in the Sunday service and talk with the priest about how else it can be used.
The collects for the Sundays after Pentecost have the special name, Propers, mostly because there are so many of them (29 total). Proper 18 is for the Sunday closest to September 7th. Which proper one starts with after Pentecost varies based on the date of Easter, they could start as early as May 11 (Proper 1) and as late as June 29 (Proper 8).
Jon



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cas

posted September 9, 2007 at 10:09 pm


Thanks Jon,
That’s pretty much what I’ve been doing, so I guess I’ve got it figured out. I just didn’t know it!



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Mariam

posted September 9, 2007 at 11:14 pm


Cas,
I often get lost this time of year in my prayer book – in the interminable “ordinary time”, especially if I haven’t been able to get to church and have substituted other devotions for the BCP. Then I either say, oh well and pick a form and week at random, or I fall back on my own handmade prayer book, where I have written out some of my favourite prayers from the BCP and other sources, or if I really want to get back on track and put the little red silk bookmark in the right place I refer to the Daily Prayer of the CHurch of England:
http://cofe.anglican.org/worship/dailyprayer/ which is a little longer version of what I have and tells me what week it is in the Anglican Cycle.



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cas

posted September 10, 2007 at 8:32 am


thanks Mariam. That’s what I need, because I didn’t know what week it is.



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Jeremy Bouma

posted September 10, 2007 at 9:58 am


Not to use this site for advertising my own creations, but I figured it was relevant to the discussion. For anyone interested, I started a space dedicated to recapturing ancient fixed-hour prayer for the 21st century. For each day of the week, three amended “offices” are designed to provide simple, yet meaningful sessions of personal prayer that are accessible anywhere in the world.
If you visit the site, click on the “start” button, then simply select your day, choose the time of day and enjoy a time of personal fellowship, praise, and prayer with your Creator and Restorer.
You may access the site using two URLs:
http://www.thedailyoffice.net
dailyoffice.novuslumen.net



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Michelle Van Loon

posted September 10, 2007 at 1:28 pm


In south Florida, caring for my terminally ill mother, I’m especially grateful for the written prayers of other saints right now when my own words are clumsy and tired. Thanks, Scot.



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Jon

posted September 10, 2007 at 7:59 pm


The Propers all list the date on which they’re supposed to be used. You just have to figure out to which the past Sunday is closest, unless you cheat by having a calendar with all that info on it.
Jon



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cas

posted September 10, 2007 at 9:17 pm


Jeremy,
That is exactly what I need. Thanks!



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