Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Weekly Meanderings

posted by xscot mcknight

The Oracle (not of Delphi but) of Chicago…
airwatershow.jpg
Is Focolare the emerging movement among Roman Catholics? “They are attractive to people who don’t like church but who want to get involved with their faith.”
Reading habits. We’re higher than the average.
My colleague, Brad Nassif, has a podcast series called “Simply Orthodox.” I highly recommend Brad’s series — it will introduce you to a gospel-centered Eastern Orthodoxy.
And Ginny Olson, my colleague, has produced a podcast about teenage girls — her book is an exceptional source.
The Alpha Male Hummingbird.
Barna’s new study shows voters are more concerned about children than moral and spiritual issues.
I’m willing to bet, and I’m not a betting man, that Jesus would welcome both of these groups to the Table and then, just prior to the prayer, tell them to knock it off!
Maybe the best Website for Websites in the World!
1. Chicago may give tickets to the Wiener Mobile, but it is the Center of the Planet for hot dogs. But I must admit to something: we saw more hot dog stands in Copenhagen than I’ve ever seen in Chicago.
2. Kris and I know we have been dealt a fortunate hand when it comes to travel, so I wanted to know if this piece on the 10 most disappointing places and the 10 best places resonated with me. I think we generally don’t like famous places (though I loved the ruins in Rome’s Forum), and always find small places most memorable. So I’ll tell what I like most: an evening in Italy in which the sun goes down gently. Preferably near the water, but it doesn’t matter. Just give me an evening in Italy and I’ll say “This is the best place in the world to visit.”
3. Is history becoming history?
4 . A kind of ministry sensitive we need.
5. Kris and I take a walk everyday, world without end. On weekends we walk at Independence Grove, a wonderful combination of prairie grasses, water, and walking paths. The Chicago Tribune published a picture of our walk place — a couple under an umbrella. We forgot our umbrella and got soaked.
couple-walking.jpg
6. A mom is a mom is a mom even when being a dog-mom with a cat!
7. This makes me want to try out for our college’s golf team. (HT: Ted Gossard)
8. Would you vote for this or not? (I would.)
baggies.jpg
9. On Christianne Amanpour’s series: the use of the word “warriors” didn’t sit right with me. It’s a pejorative term up front that casts all the groups, with considerable varieties in each religion, into a militaristic and violent mode.
Sports:
Undoubtedly, the commentators for Monday Night Football brutalized Rex Grossman. They were one-note Charlies who could say nothing but bad — and if someone slipped in something good they had to say “but when he was bad he was horrible.” Ahem. Excuse me. When Grossman left the game, the Bears were ahead 10-7. They were playing the Super Bowl Champions. Stick to commentary instead of evaluation.
Did you notice the Cubs this week? It’s not pretty but they’re in the driver’s seat.



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Eugene

posted August 25, 2007 at 12:41 am


How ’bout them Seattle Mariners!!!



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rich

posted August 25, 2007 at 12:42 am


Scot,
Sorry, I know you are a Bears homer, but Rex was and is bad. He will be the undoing of that team this year. I am still in shock that they got to the Super Bowl last year with him. Of course he does play in the NFC…



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Tim Gombis

posted August 25, 2007 at 5:49 am


The baptism/Lord’s Table issue reminds me of your noting the rise of neo-fundamentalism and the great difference between fundamentalists and this new emerging generation of Jesus-followers. A central battle cry of fundamentalists is “truth before friendship,” which means I’ll distance myself from precious sisters and brothers over a principle I’m supposed to hold dear.
The emerging conviction would be that truth demands my committed friendship and table fellowship with those with whom I disagree. We don’t pit truth over-against friendship as our fundamentalist friends do. And we don’t separate from precious fundamentalists either, despite their separatism!! Thanks for the link to that post.
Go Cubbies! 1 1/2 games up!



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joe

posted August 25, 2007 at 7:35 am


the story of the 57 year old returning to college football is a good story. i heard it on the radio on the “Jim Rome Show” (the jungle)yesterday as well. he feels like it is an opportunity to set some things right.
i think if we knew there was somethiing we could do to set right past mistakes, we would want to try at least too. good story.
i started to read the grudem/piper story and suddenly discovered i couldnt be bothered.



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Ivy Gauvin

posted August 25, 2007 at 7:45 am


Scot, I have a quick question regarding Brad Nassif and Orthodoxy. Nassif is an Arab name. Is he part of the Antiochian Orthodox community? They are primarily Arab. A former pastor has become Antiochian as have many other evangelicals. Thanks.



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Jason Dye

posted August 25, 2007 at 7:56 am


oh, great. now i want to go on a tour of hot dog stands (and i’ve yet to visit Hot Dawgs) at 8 o’clock on a saturday morning.
True love is never served by compromising the truth. (True. But then i would ask, what is meant by the word ‘compromising’? I certainly don’t think that believers should shut their mouths on important issues, but isn’t the practice of the Lord’s Supper more important than the specifics of how or when one is baptized?) There is no greater expression of love for another than the willingness to make painful and unpopular decisions for the sake of bringing an errant brother into the light. (hmmm… sounds familiar. just somehow off a bit…)
it makes me glad that i don’t worry about these so-called fundamental issues anymore, since they are not fundamental to Christian living, the heart of God or the Gospel, as far as i can tell.
in regards to the saggy pants issue, i really want to ban them in public places, trust me. i just don’t believe that it’s the way to go, further criminalizing young black males over a really stupid fashion trend that will eventually fade out.
and i’m sorry. i really want to believe in rex. but i think rich is right on this one.



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Ted

posted August 25, 2007 at 8:07 am


Scot,
Can’t imagine the Copenhagen hot dogs being better than a Chicago dog!
On Tim’s post (#3) – I agree that it is disappointing to see this debate and I think you have a good idea of what Jesus would do. But in a friendly response to Tim and others regarding the neo-fundamentalist attitude, that attitude is just as true of moderates. Agree with them or suffer the same fate as Tim mentioned.
In fairness to Tim, he was not perjorative and his point is well taken in so far as it goes. I simply wanted to point out that the sword cuts both ways.



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Bob Robinson

posted August 25, 2007 at 8:31 am


Sam Storms’ post on the two groups disagreeing over the Lord’s Table is very telling, isn’t it?
The table is the ultimate expression of favor and unity. The Lord invites us – those who believe and have fellowship with him – to eat with him. And we eat together as “one loaf” (1 Cor 10:17) for we are one body.
Storms is right to show the hypocrisy (my word, not his) of a conference called “Together for the Gospel” that has leaders vying for the exclusion of paedo-baptists from fellowship at the Lord’s Table.
I’d bet, as well, that Jesus would invite them all together to the table and then tell them to knock it off!



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James

posted August 25, 2007 at 8:32 am


“American Civil Liberties Union Georgia president Debbie Seagraves said the proposal is too vague and would unfairly target African-Americans.”
Not where I live. This practice is equally distributed among the races in NY.
I think I need to forward this on to our city counsel.



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Bob Robinson

posted August 25, 2007 at 8:36 am


It’s not pretty over in the AL Central either, but the Tribe holds on to a 1.5 game lead. They had better win the division, or else they will be watching either the Mariners or the Yankees in the playoffs.



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Scot McKnight

posted August 25, 2007 at 8:47 am


Ivy,
Yes, Brad is Arab. Lebanese and Antiochian.



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Jason Dye

posted August 25, 2007 at 8:50 am


Also found this fact telling:
Those likeliest to read religious books included older and married women, lower earners, minorities, lesser educated people, Southerners, rural residents, Republicans and conservatives.
I guess I would be a whole new demographic, no?



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Jamie Arpin-Ricci

posted August 25, 2007 at 9:16 am


Scot,
I have to agree with Jason on the baggy pants vote. I think we would pay a much higher price for criminalizing something that has some strong connections to racial identity and youth culture. I would vote AGAINST the ban.
Peace,
Jamie



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Tope

posted August 25, 2007 at 9:36 am


I don’t see how one could object too much to the use of the word “warriors” in Amanpour’s series since all of the groups she reports would describe themselves using that word. I think we should give the viewers more credit to be able to distinguish between radical Muslim “warriors,” Zionist “warriors,” and conservative Christian “warriors.” The word is the same but it has pretty obviously different connotations in each context. Certainly the Christians I know [of] who would use the word ‘warrior’ to describe themselves are explicitly drawing on militaristic and violent imagery (cf Mark Driscoll’s church planting video).



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Julie

posted August 25, 2007 at 10:26 am


I’ve heard the word “warriors” used to describe Christians and Muslims. It was new to me to hear it used with Jews.
War-like imagery, being a soldier, warring against the culture, the culture wars and the very word “warrior” characterize much of the religious right’s rhetoric. Listen to Focus on the Family for ten years and you’ll hear it all.



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Julie

posted August 25, 2007 at 10:29 am


#8 – I’d vote against that ban in a heartbeat. Enough criminalizing targeting blacks.



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Justin Taylor

posted August 25, 2007 at 10:53 am


Scot,
Re: the Table dispute. Why would Jesus tell the Sam-Storms side to “knock it off”–they are the ones saying that all believers are welcome to the table!
JT



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Scot McKnight

posted August 25, 2007 at 10:56 am


JT,
I thought I was not suggesting Sam should knock it off for he is saying “come to the table, both of you” — but he would be telling them to quit fighting over it, sit at the table, and partake of him.



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Scot McKnight

posted August 25, 2007 at 11:05 am


Julie,
And I’ll lay money down your vote will be on the winning side. Still, I see enough of it as I commute and I’ve seen enough. I’d rather look at leisure suits! How about you?



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Jason Dye

posted August 25, 2007 at 11:23 am


Scot,
And I teach those same kids with the saggy (not to be confused with baggy) pants. It’s humiliating, ugly, and frustrating. Add to this the troubling mythos of where the fashion trend stems from, then it’s just disastrous all around.
But it’s a fashion trend and we should never let our feelings about such things relegate itself into the legal realm, especially when most of the “perpetrators” of this look are young, male and African-American and when the slope is so slippery. Kids will look back on this the same way my generation looks back on Kid ‘N’ Play’s hair-do’s and Criss-Cross’s backwards clothes.



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Scott M

posted August 25, 2007 at 11:48 am


Before I even look at the rest of the meanderings, I’ve been absorbing a number of the Ancient Faith Radio podcasts over the past few months. I just pulled the first two Simply Orthodox podcasts to my player. So far, my personal favorite has been Pilgrims from Paradise. I thought the name looked vaguely familiar as I was pulling the podcasts. I suppose you’ve mentioned him before?



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Julie

posted August 25, 2007 at 11:51 am


Scot, I admit to not liking the hang-down pants look (particularly around the knees). I just dislike legislating against it more. :)



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Kenton

posted August 25, 2007 at 11:57 am


Scot-
Can I misquote you and say that the Emerging Church wants its followers to remain celibate? :)



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Tope

posted August 25, 2007 at 12:27 pm


I agree with the comments that a fine for saggy pants would unfairly target young black men. However, I think such a law would be objectionable not just because of its consequences, but as a matter of principle. It is not the government’s job to regulate what people wear, or how they wear it. What’s next? Fining women for dressing “immodestly?”



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James

posted August 25, 2007 at 12:46 pm


Well, I was kidding about forwarding the thing on to the city council, but I do think that the idea this is a racial issue is ridiculous. Maybe that’s true in Atlanta, but in the Northeast you’re as likely to see this trend in any neighborhood, rich or poor, no matter the racial makeup. I live on a street, in fact, where the African Americans do NOT wear their pants this way, but the white people do.
I think the racial aspect was added to do just what it did…stoke people against the ban over an aspect of it that is not legitimate rather than appeal on the basis of real reasons to be agains it.
And Jason Dye, the mythos of its origin is certainly reason enough to buy a belt and suspenders have the Erkel makeover.



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Jason Dye

posted August 25, 2007 at 1:34 pm


wWll, James, since the ordinance on the table is from Atlanta, maybe we should start from that point. and since the trend almost without a shred of doubt started within the lower-class, male, Af-Am/hip-hop culture and then spread out (as most of youth culture elements do) to other minorities and the middle class teenagers, maybe we should also start there.
Neither history nor present-day realities have been kind to the af-am male youth set. This, in all reality, would be just a small infraction in a long line of valid injustices, but I cannot see it serving a noble nor good purpose, but only further disenfranchising many who are unfavorably dispositioned against the norms, power-structures of society, let alone the rules and regulations of white middle class culture, as it is.
Besides, I’m sure the ACLU can find other, and more popular, reasons to be against the ban (such as the one that myself, Tope and Julie argue).
And last but certainly not least, his name is Urkel. :)



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Tim Gombis

posted August 25, 2007 at 2:04 pm


Ted (#7), I think I agree with you! As Scot mentioned some time ago, one error of emergent folks is that they embrace everyone BUT fundies. That’s why I said that we (“we” as Jesus-followers, not “we” as emergents) must embrace even those who would reject us, or would refuse table-fellowship. So, yes, even moderates (theo/culturally)–goodness, everyone!!–must resist the temptation to draw lines and exclude others…



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RJS

posted August 25, 2007 at 2:20 pm


Off topic – but – your own amazon store now!?



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Scot McKnight

posted August 25, 2007 at 3:00 pm


RJS,
I don’t want my book image section to get any larger — and “we’ve” got a few books in the works so … this idea of a store with Amazon was the easiest way to link all of my books at once.
Then I got to tinkering and added Memoirs (Kris’ favorite) and Religion books (the topic of the blog).



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Scot McKnight

posted August 25, 2007 at 3:11 pm


RJS,
I’ll be tinkering with it some more — and I just added links to some authors.



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RJS

posted August 25, 2007 at 3:16 pm


Cool



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John Frye

posted August 25, 2007 at 7:38 pm


#2 Our last day in Turkey we visited the Cappadocia Caves. The above ground landscape is remarkable (Star Wars was filmed here) and the caves produce extreme fear as you travel several hundred feet underground sometimes in total darkness and then stand on ledges inches away from steep drop offs. I’d go again before going to Paris any day.
Julie



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Ted

posted August 25, 2007 at 7:56 pm


Tim, #27 – We do agree.
On baggy pants – what plumbers made infamous is now fashionable. Amazing what a little style can do. :)



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Christine

posted August 25, 2007 at 10:30 pm


Scot, I’m guessing that the ‘memoirs’ section aren’t books that you’ve necessarily read. Is that correct? Somehow I cannot quite picture you reading “The Diana Chronicles” or the book about Alan Jackson’s infidelity. But maybe I’ve misread you!! :-)
So are these just memoirs that Amazon happens to sell, or do you actually endorse them?



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Scot McKnight

posted August 26, 2007 at 6:44 am


Christine,
Yes, that’s right. These are the Amazon collections of memoirs and Religion Books. I can’t select books; I can select Categories of books.



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Bill

posted August 27, 2007 at 9:29 pm


I had to laugh about the saggy pants thing. However, I think I agree somewhat with James. The ACLU makes a racist comment about the ordinance being a problem for African-Americans. So, we are to believe only or mostly African-Americans wear their pants with the crotches nearly dragging the ground. Talk about bolstering a racial sterotype and the ACLU gets away with it.
It comes close to exhibitionism but I don’t think African-Americans have a corner on that market. How about white teen and pre-teen girls who wear too little clothing? What are you going to do about that? I got it. (Tongue in cheek) let’s legislate public spankings for the parents of these kids. Forget the fines. The problem is at home and a sore tush is sometimes a great preventitive.



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Jason Dye

posted August 27, 2007 at 11:00 pm


I’m not sure what part of what Ms. Seagraves said was inaccurate, misleading, patronizing or in other ways demeaning to African Americans. How is she acting in a way of power over African Americans in a way to put herself (and her race, if we assume that she isn’t black) in a position of superiority?
Maybe, as James had pointed out, the issue isn’t directed at African Americans as much in certain regions of the country, but in many of the larger urban areas (certainly in Chicago) that is the case. And so such litigation would be, purposefully or not, directed toward the young, African American male subset. Not all, of course. But just enough to make them feel targeted again.



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