Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Friday is for Friends

posted by xscot mcknight

Do you have an anamchara, the Celtic word for “soul friend” or “spiritual director”? Tracy Balzer’s second chapter, in Thin Places, is a delicate and insightful survey of the Celtic practice and how spiritual direction or soul friendship can be developed in our world.
Here are our questions: Do you have any experience with spiritual direction? Either as the director or the one receiving direction? Experience with spiritual friendships or soul friends?
St. Camgall of Bangor, a 7th Century saint, said “it is not good to be your own guide.” Many of us are. Do we need to rethink our independence, our rugged individualism, and consider having an anamchara? St. Brigid, a 6th Century saint, said “a person without a soul friend is like a body without a head.”
A soul friend provides sanctuary — a safe place to reveal, to ponder, and to learn — and confession — so that the words may be heard in an audible way making us more aware of our sins and accountability.
We lack safe places today and we grow restless in spirit — we are afraid to voice our honest questions because of fear of condemnation. An anamchara can help.
Tracy tells the story of a friend who spoke to her students about the “power of the secret” (life) and the need to “break the secret.”
The anamchara asks questions and listens well. In essence, the anamchara enables a person to hear from God, listen to God, and to walk the life of faith better.
It is not good to be your own guide… that statement, at the close of the chapter, was for me the best thing said.



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joe

posted August 31, 2007 at 6:32 am


when i lived in denver, there were 3 or 4 of us men that would get together and basically search each others souls. we would confess sin to each other. we would encourage and exhort each other. shoot, we would go out for coffee and discuss god and theology the whole time. and we would laugh a lot together. we were each others spiritual guide. i miss that alot.



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Diane

posted August 31, 2007 at 6:53 am


Scot,
Do you have a spiritual director? And how did you find one? How does that work when you are so knowledgeable?
Balzer uses the lens of Celtic Christianity to present a utopic vision of what spiritual direction could look like and she does a good job with it. I find it a good exercise to imagine what the best would look like and work toward that.
I saw a spiritual director for a time last year, because I did realize I needed some direction. I liked her and she gave me the Glenstal Book of Prayer, which I use quite frequently. Her basic stance was, “if you meet Buddha in the road, slay him.” That’s what she said (oddly, I had never heard that before) and I understood it to mean: You don’t need a spiritual director. So anyway, she was vey helpful actually, but a contrast to the kind of director Balzer talks about. My director told me I already had what I needed inside, a contrast to “it is not good to be your own guide.”
I find it hard to find spiritual direction because I “know” so much, my head is so stuffed with religious knowledge and trivia, my work and passion is in religion, and “I’ve been there, done that” in so many ways, read that, seen that … you know, people tell me oh, try Richard Foster, Brother Lawrence, small groups, yadda, yadda, and tell me “head knowledge isn’t heart knowledge” and none of this is actually news to me. I keep searching for the next step, which is why the comment here some months ago about more “mature” Christians at Willow Creek being told to “self-feed” resonates. I tend to agree that self-feeding is not enough and that it’s not good to be your own guide.



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Ivy Gauvin

posted August 31, 2007 at 6:54 am


When I took a course in Spiritual Formation, I really felt the need to have a spiritual director, someone besides my husband to hold me accountable. It took several months to come to fruition, but I now have one. Pastor Linda in the next town is being certified as a spiritual director and is doing her doctorate in spiritual formation. It has been a good match for both of us. I have been encouraged that I am indeed on the right path and that I have gifts to offer the church.



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RJS

posted August 31, 2007 at 7:25 am


Answers to your three questions – No, No, and No – it is even difficult to find a forum to ask questions and discuss issues without simple pat answers.
This failing of the Christian community would probably feed well into your Finding Faith/Losing Faith series.



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Scot McKnight

posted August 31, 2007 at 7:32 am


Diane,
I don’t have a spiritual director in an official sense. Kris and I talk about a lot and the development of husbands and wives being friends, which shifts the tendencies in the last 30 years, have minimized directors. And the rise of Christians seeing therapists have done the same.
But I also have a friend or two with whom I talk when I need counsel and advising.



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Nathanael

posted August 31, 2007 at 7:40 am


Great thoughts…
For years after I became a Jesus follower, I struggled and gave into a serious pornography addiction. I knew Psalm 51 by heart, not because I was trying to memorize it, but because I read it so many times. I remember the Lord kept telling me to tell someone. But I was too ashamed. Finally, I went to a good friend and dear brother and told all. I still struggle with the temptation, but I have people I can go to who will talk and pray with me.
I preached about two years ago on the need for transparency and vulnerability in our midst. At that time, our ministry was drawing about 1000 young people every Sunday night. I felt the Lord compelling me to share of that struggle. No one but this young man I confided in and my then girlfriend (now wife Michelle) knew of my addiction. I told the Lord I would not do it. He told me I was going to. We had a brief argument, which He won.
One of my main points in that message was the very same “secret” that Tracy writes about. I used the example of two siblings growing up together. I said, if I do something wrong and get away with it, but my brother or sister knows, they control me. I will do anything for them to keep them from spilling the beans. But when I tell on myself, their power over me and my secret is broken, and I am free. Not easy, but amazingly freeing.
You can listen to it at http://www.thebridgeministries.com/audio
on September 4, 2005. This message was my first time public preaching ever. So be gentle with your critiques. :)



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RJS

posted August 31, 2007 at 9:05 am


Scot,
So maybe I am confused about the term here – and see something of a disconnect between your fourth and fifth paragraphs. Is this Balzer simply referring to soul friend in the sense of maintaining accountability (fourth paragraph), breaking the secret, advising in relationship? In this case therapist, spouse, a couple of good friends, fellowship group, pastoral counseling, and so forth – can fill the role. It is not good to be your own guide, but the role need not be formal in any sense either. I would not, in fact, answer an absolute no in this case, by any means.
On the other hand this is distinct in many ways from your statement in paragraph five. We lack safe places to voice honest questions and reflect on the nature of God, theology, the spiritual life, without condemnation or fear. My comment (#4) related more to this issue. This is another area where self-feeding is not enough and it is not good to be your own guide – but it is difficult to find direction – or even the ability to find people (advisors or peers) willing to have coffee and talk.



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Scot McKnight

posted August 31, 2007 at 9:21 am


RJS,
We are no doubt on the same page but probably trapped in a corner of our own making. Let me try it this way: an anamchara can serve various roles for different people. Some may need direction; some may need an ear; some may need someone who can say “It’s OK to think like that; others think like that, too.” Others might simply be a sanctuary where we can say “I’m not so sure about some of these ideas that some think are so important.”
Which means we might seek an anamchara for a variety of reasons as well.
I had not thought of this, but my colleagues who hear me out when I have a new idea or something to experiment with perform the function of an intellectual anamchara. I say this because those of us who are professors probably connect our ideas and our scholarship more tightly to who we are than most.



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grace

posted August 31, 2007 at 9:30 am


I think that this really hits on the biblical idea of eldering. Rather than seen solely as a church board position, eldering should entail the type of relationship that provides this kind of support and guidance.
I’m a little leery of formalizing and titling the role, however I see it as important in the context of relationship, trust, and mutual submission.



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John L

posted August 31, 2007 at 9:30 am


Blogging my way thru Viola’s “Pagan Christianity” right now. Just finished up commenting on the evolving concept of “pastor,” from the early church onward.
The early church, before Ignatius (et al) created the “lay-clergy” split, reflects a community that seems more appropriate to “spiritual direction” via active (and unpaid) elders, pastors, teachers, and others with unique gifts and callings.
Today, we have burnt-out professional pastor/CEO’s who can barely find time for their own family, let alone spend quality time mentoring others in spiritual disciplines.
Perhaps it’s time to revisit the early “horizontal” church as a model of full-body engagement and community health, including a more organic approach to keeping wisdom and passing along spiritual direction to others.



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Jennifer

posted August 31, 2007 at 10:18 am


The Lord has been so extravagantly good to me in this area.
5 years ago the Lord sent me someone who could not only be a spiritual director to me, but also a close friend. For me, it was the relational/friendship element that helped break through the split between head and heart that Diane talks about in#2.
One surprising thing about that relationship is that we are close as can be, even though he’s a man and I’m a woman. Some people find that controversial, but for me it’s been a surprise blessing from the Lord.
Dan Brennan excellently writes on both friendship as spiritual direction, and male-female friendship here http://www.danbrennan.typepad.com



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RJS

posted August 31, 2007 at 10:50 am


Scot,
Well, the function of an “intellectual anamchara” in areas of theology and religion – especially one willing to hear me out without being threatened, willing to sit down to coffee, or lunch, and to converse (two-way-street) – this is hard to find, an presents a challenge. Perhaps more so for me because I do find such persons in areas more closely aligned with my academic specialty and know what I’m missing. Perhaps also because I do connect ideas, rational thinking, scholarship, more tightly to who I am and to faith than most people seem to.
Which brings me back to the reference to your book and blog series on Finding Faith/Losing Faith. Do you think that the lack of such a presence may contribute to the stories of losing faith so common in academic (and other) circles?



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Scot McKnight

posted August 31, 2007 at 11:27 am


RJS,
I’m certain of that. The need for intellectual anamcharas is great. Many are afraid to say what they are thinking; many are afraid to listen to those who have fears; many are afraid of where the discussion may take them.
What if we find that Jonah is a parable? Does that hurt our faith? I think not. We can’t be afraid to let the Bible be what it is.



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Julie Clawson

posted August 31, 2007 at 11:30 am


I have had a very hard time find any mentor/friend in the church because (1.) most are afraid of emerging postmodern thought and simply advise me to abandon just dangerous question instead of help me think through them and (2.) I have a real issue with having to hire someone to be my friend or adviser, in my mind they can never be a true friend if I have to pay them to do it.



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Dan Brennan

posted August 31, 2007 at 11:40 am


Thanks the plug Jennifer.
We must be good friends or it must be that time of the year on Jesus Creed (check last year’s Friday is for Friends on September 1st).
I suggest we do need an “emerging” view of spiritual direction. There is no monolithic form of spiritual direction in church history. Perhaps we need a “purple” vision of spiritual direction and soul friends. Some were distant forms while others like Salesian friendship and direction, to just name one example, operated on a much more intimate level of direction and friendship combining the two.
Some friendships and direction are temporary and “distant” as far as relationship goes. Other forms, in church history take the form of serious, mutual love, up-close defying common notions direction needs to be detached or “objective.” Like de Sales, some attempt to form “personal communities” in spiritual direction that are mutually directive and purposeful.
There is enough information and sufficient models in church history to appreciate soul friendship dyads as a wonderful place of spiritual direction, direction not only in the immediate sense, but also eschatological direction. There are plenty of models to choose from in church history–both the distant kind or the close dyad type. We don’t have to choose one or the other. We do need a vision of what the perichoretic community of the Trinity does for soul friendship dyads and, for triads–both the unity and diversity.



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Tracy Balzer

posted August 31, 2007 at 11:49 am


Julie brings up two very real issues — how to find an appropriately sympathetic ear, and whether it makes sense to pay for that ear.
My own personal situation with my director addresses both. After exhausting all local possibilities and natural affiliations, I went to Spiritual Directors International for help (sdiworld.org). They have listings of all of their members and you can look them up by region. Each name will include contact information as well as their particular religious affiliation — which is very important, as SDI includes folks from a variety of faiths.
It took a bit of doing, but I did actually find a wonderful director. She and I did not know each other previously, so I don’t really consider her a “friend” as much as one who prayerfully brings an objective perspective to my life. So I don’t feel like I’m paying for friendship, but for a service that helps me listen to God in my life (Some people pay for a massage or manicure — for me,this is money better spent!).



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Jennifer

posted August 31, 2007 at 12:06 pm


Tracy,
I should chime in with this also…It is possible to find someone to be a spiritual friend/director long-distance. It might not be totally ideal, but it can work.



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Peggy

posted August 31, 2007 at 12:41 pm


Scot, Tracy, Diane, Jennifer, Julie…and all,
This is very much in line with the topic of my chapter in “Voices” about “virtual mentoring” and it has been a powerful thing in my life. Paul Walker is blogging through the book a chapter a day (and will be getting to Scot’s chapter in five days!). The link to his blog of my chapter (with comments) is here:
http://outofthecocoon.squarespace.com/main/2007/8/17/wikiklesia-5-virtual-mentoring-at-the-abbey.html#comment956890
(We’re just a week or two away from the paperback being published…)



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Ivy Gauvin

posted August 31, 2007 at 1:33 pm


To everyone regarding the cost of a spiritual director. Maybe it’s just because mine is a pastor, but she does not charge anything for this. She just considers it a ministry and a privilege to do this. She has a spiritual director for herself and has been involved in spiritual direction for a number of years.



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Beth

posted August 31, 2007 at 1:43 pm


I have been in direction off and on since about 1990, and I also do direction myself. I have always paid or made offerings unless the person was salaried by a job which treated his/her having directees as part of the job description. To ask someone to invest in training and so on, and then set aside an hour of professional time for me monthly with no recompense doesn’t seem fair — nor would I feel comfortable being asked to do so.
I have also avoided having, as they call it, a “dual role” with my director or my directees — for example, when I was in parish ministry I would send parishioners elsewhere if they were looking for an ongoing formal direction relationship rather than occasional pastoral meetings(and other parish clergy sent theirs to me).And I wouldn’t try to be “regular friends” with a director or directee, although I certainly have friends with whom I can share spiritually and value that greatly… but that’s a separate type of relationship than one in which I completely set aside my own agenda and interests to attend to the movement of the Spirit in someone else’s life.
To piggyback on Tracey — SDI does work as a resource, but one issue for some readers here with using SDI to find a director would be that because they are so interfaith oriented, some more mainstream or evangelical Christian directors feel that the investment of money to maintain a membership is better made in joining other kinds of spiritual formation networks/conferences… so in some senses SDI is only a section of the whole pool that’s out there. (though of course they’re a great organization in their own right.)
What else…
I’m also in a colleague group of other directors with a more evangelical bent. And I did once have a director online, and it worked OK… although he was not quite comfortable enough with email to make it a real success.



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Diane

posted August 31, 2007 at 1:54 pm


Beth,
How do you find people outside of SDI?
Julie,
I too have issues with paying for spiritual direction. I think it’s very awkward to put a price tag on that kind of relationship. I do think people should be paid for their work, but I find myself overall uneasy with the church and it’s relationship to money. More and more I believe we need to be paid to do what we do outside the boundaries of the church and give our gifts freely inside. How do we define inside/outside? I don’t know. But in my utopic visioning, people would simply find ways to work part-time in the secular world and use the time freed up to serve the KOG without financial recompense. This would help solve the pastor burnout problem, as burned-out people could simply take a break without disrupting the family income.



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Ted M. Gossard

posted August 31, 2007 at 2:02 pm


I think in one way or another we need this. But I also think it can’t just be a reciprocal practice that an entire fellowship does with each other. I’ve heard of one case where the person was badly burned by his friend he shared with. I think spiritual directors or anamchras need to be those who walk close to the Lord (like elders who must meet Christian standards as in 1 Timothy and Titus), not just any Christian you might know. The one you share with or confess to, you must trust. And this trust has to be related to their character.
I have been and am being greatly helped by someone and their spouse who I know largely through the Internet. This is becoming lifechanging for me, though it certainly isn’t easy. But apart from them, I’m not sure I’d be experiencing this breakthrough. I don’t think so.



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RJS

posted August 31, 2007 at 2:08 pm


Beth,
On the dual role issue etc. – your definition of spiritual direction sounds more like professional counseling and/or therapy.
A useful function/role – with much value in certain circumstances. But not not a source for real, long lasting, spiritual direction, which I think comes from relationship and fellowship with believers.
This fundamental idea – one goes to professionals for answers – and then one gets on with life – is part of the problem with our society and our church.



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Tracy Balzer

posted August 31, 2007 at 2:30 pm


I hope what we’re seeing here is the vast array of ways that this principle of soul friendship can be applied. On one end of the spectrum, spiritual direction is a skill that folks like myself and others get trained to do. Some of us charge money for the service (like my director), some take donations (like the Benedictine sister I saw for a time) and some do not charge at all (like myself, because it’s so much a part of my job).At the other end are those wonderful relationships that emerge and naturally grow into deep spiritual friendships.
Sometimes I need a professional, like a pastor or a counsellor. Sometimes I need my friend Sally, who is 2,000 miles away and is a true soul friend to me. The main point, I think, is that we need MORE FOLKS who are willing to serve in this capacity, professionals and laity, because each of us needs help in discerning the voice of God.



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Tracy Balzer

posted August 31, 2007 at 2:32 pm


Sorry, I also wanted to say that I’d love to know about any “networks” of directors out there who work from a decidedly evangelical perspective. Beth, do you know of any?



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Peggy

posted August 31, 2007 at 3:14 pm


RJS,
I agree that this kind of care for one another is something that needs to be restored in the Body of Christ. I am only grateful to see that many other people are recognizing this–often as part of the discipleship process, which also has gotten terribly diluted.



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Beth

posted August 31, 2007 at 3:45 pm


Diane — local referrals from pastors, monasteries, denominational offices, or theological seminaries are a good place to start. Often clergy more on the liturgical end of the spectrum (Anglican, Catholic, Lutheran) will have people they regularly recommend. Prayer for the Spirit to lead you is invaluable!
RJS — There are lots of written resources out there on the fruitful history of the classical spiritual direction process, if knowing more about that might interest you, so I won’t recap them here. Just briefly, however, anyone called to this ministry can vouch that it’s not at all like therapy (and how not, since it predates therapy by over a millennium?), nor does it revolve around “answers.”
I’d join the chorus over centuries who bear witness that the growth and transformation available through a classical direction relationship with a person who has gifts and training for that ministry is something distinct from the growth and transformation available through a mutual spiritual friendship with a fellow Christian. Both are great graces from God, both have their place, neither needs to exclude or judge the other. As Tracy said, “we need MORE FOLKS” to serve each other in all these ways the Spirit wishes to use.
Tracy – Yes, in fact I’m part of such a network in Massachusetts, and our convener Andrea Bliss-Lerman just had an article published about it in the fall issue of “Presence,” the SDI journal. There is a local training program for evangelical spiritual directors here as well (http://www.healthydisciple.net/selah.htm).



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Jennifer

posted August 31, 2007 at 4:06 pm


Beth #20,
I know some people are just not comfortable being friends with people they do spiritual direction with (or who attend their church), but for me it’s the freindship that has made it work. It’s not for everyone perhaps, but it can work beautifully. I think there is a wide range of comfort levels and appropriate behavior here. A soul friendship can range anywhere from a one-time connection where a person prays for you/listens to you in a specific context, all the way to being intimate friends where lots of connection and interaction happens outside of the regular prayer time or direction time. There are approrpiate points all along that spectrum.
Jennifer



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Jennifer

posted August 31, 2007 at 4:11 pm


Beth #27,
Its interesting that you bring up the history of spiritual direction as well as the distance-model (not being friends with directees, sending them elsewhere for other things,etc). I’m sure you are aware of the historical directors who had very intimate relationships with their directees – men to men, women to women, and even across the genders. Historically, we see a wide range of emotional engagement directors and directees have.



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Bob

posted August 31, 2007 at 9:53 pm


Call me naive if you must, but I ain’t got half the education of lot of you have, and I sure don’t know nothin’ about having an anamchara. And I ain’t never had no vision of the perichoretic community of the Trinity, either. Dyads sound okay, but triads seem just a bit kinky. Can’t you folks speak plain English like normal people?
Sorry, I’ve been reading too much Flannery O’Connor of late.



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Anonymous

posted August 31, 2007 at 10:16 pm


Soul Friend | An Unfinished Soul

[...] I was blog hopping tonight, looking for something interesting to read, and eventually I wandered over to Scot McKnight’s Jesus Creed. In Scot’s post “Friday is for Friends” he discusses the idea of anamchara – a Gaelic word that can be translated as “soul friend” or “spiritual adviser.” Scot, quoting the book Thin Places, has this to say: St. Camgall of Bangor, a 7th Century saint, said “it is not good to be your own guide.” Many of us are. Do we need to rethink our independence, our rugged individualism, and consider having an anamchara? St. Brigid, a 6th Century saint, said “a person without a soul friend is like a body without a head.” [...]



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Georges Boujakly

posted August 31, 2007 at 10:30 pm


Scot,
Yes to all three questions for me.
The benefits have been significant enough for me to maintain a relationship with my spiritual director for over two years now. It’s a donation-based ministry.
I found this director through a leader’s recommendation at a 5 Day Spiritual Academy (Upper Room Minitries).
Beth, and Tracy, I resonate with what you are saying. What I might add is that spiritual direction is not a short term experience. The one giving direction needs to understand our story, how God has been at work, pray a lot for us, and input what Scriptural and Chritocentric insights the HS gives them for us. In this sense, preaching or teaching can be spiritual direction for the masses. I have found great value in someone who has taken the time and invested great effort to learn my story, discover how my heart is shaped, and how the Spirit might be moving in my life.
What has also been helpful is the affirmation I receive in what I sense the leading of God is in my life and that I am not alone in learning to guide myself.
I have also learned that to find spiritual friends is to be the first out of the gate in sharing personal questions of faith.
Larry Crabb has a couple of books on spiritual direction in a group that has been helpful for a group my wife and I host in our home.



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Mariam

posted September 1, 2007 at 3:21 am


I haven’t read “Thin Places” so I can’t entirely visualize the sort of spiritual mentor Tracy Balzar is talking about but the subsequent discussion here seems to be of a concept entirely American. Am I wrong or is this sort of fee-based professional spiritual counselling a new global phenomena? It does remind of something I saw this past spring on holiday on one of the Gulf Islands (nr the San Juans except in Canada). At the local market, along with the beads and pottery vendors there was a hut selling cappucinos along with various spiritual services, eg, latte’s- $5, confessions – $20. She had an American accent; it hadn’t occurred to me that she might be a Christian – but I see now I was making a perhaps a false assumption. She did a mean cappucino. I wish now I’d checked out the confessional just for informational purposes.
I don’t have a lot of religious friends, although I do have a couple of close friends – one a sort of “new=age” Zen Catholic, and one Muslim – that I do discuss ethics and faith with. For more Christ-based spiritual direction I see my priest – whose door is always open and who seems eager to have someone to discuss theological issues with – or I come here (and to a couple of other faith-based blogs). The internet is a wonderful thing.



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Bob

posted September 1, 2007 at 6:37 am


I’m not a troll. Really, I’m not. But “soul friend” or “spiritual director” makes alarm bells go off in my head. It seems a bit too close to the “spirit guides” of Spiritualism for my tastes. The people who speak of going to their pastors or priests have it right. What some untrained or uncalled person thinks is just another opinion….I don’t expect many (or even any) here to agree with me.



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Bob

posted September 1, 2007 at 6:38 am


P.S. – Of course, there’s that verse, “In the multitude of counselors there is safety,” so once again I probably don’t know what I’m talking about.



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Diane

posted September 1, 2007 at 8:34 am


Bob,
Your post (#30) gave me a laugh and reminds me of what my husband said when I was reading Embracing Grace aloud to him on the way to pick our boys up from camp last summer. (Have I mentioned that my husband is a saint to put up with me?) He said with words like perichoretic and eikon, Scot is never going to attract the kind of mass audience as Rick Warren in The Purpose-Driven Life. His suggestion (not seriously of course) was that Scot needed to dumb it down more to produce his NYTimes best seller. But, Scot, I think you’ve found good middle ground in these books.



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Beth

posted September 1, 2007 at 8:39 am


Thought I’d comment here, since it’s on topic, that the curriculum for North Park’s certificate in direction, which Scott linked to in his Saturday “Weekly Meanderings” post, looks first-rate. I definitely don’t think anyone needs to worry about *their* graduates selling ministry and lattes at a tropical market, being “uncalled and untrained,” or confusing direction with the modern counseling professions ;-)



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Jennifer

posted September 1, 2007 at 10:54 am


Mariam,
Spiritual direction is a realllly old practice. If Americans have caught on at all, they are just new comers to a party that has been going on for a long time.



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Steve

posted September 1, 2007 at 1:57 pm


Scot,
I have been trained as a spiritual director and also see a director for my ongoing growth and development. Having pastored for 22 years and also overseeing pastors for over a decade, I believe that a spiritual director can be very helpful to anyone, but especially those involved in vocational ministry. So many leaders are isolated and lacking in deep friendships. The relentless busyness of ministry often robs leaders of the time necessary to nurture a rich and growing relationship with God. A spiritual director can help one to slow down, reflect and begin to see the ever present, but often subtle, activity of God in ones life. For those who are fearful of the term “director”, as if it implies some sort of authoritarian position, the following quote from Merton puts a director’s role in proper perspective…
“the director is not to be regarded as a magical machine for solving cases and declaring the holy will of God beyond all hope of appeal, but a trusted friend who, in an atmosphere of sympathetic understanding, helps and strengthens us in our groping efforts to correspond with the grace of the Holy Spirit, who alone is the true Director in the fullest sense of the word.”



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posted 12:01:53am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Let's Get Neanderthal!
The Cave Man Diet, or Paleo Diet, is getting attention. (Nothing is said about Culver's at all.) The big omission, I have to admit, is that those folks were hunters -- using spears or smacking some rabbit upside the conk or grabbing a fish or two with their hands ... but that's what makes this diet

posted 2:05:48pm Aug. 30, 2010 | read full post »




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