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A Healthier Option?

posted by xscot mcknight

Kris, my dear wife, is a hawk when it comes to healthier foods. We gave up on red meat aeons ago and we have salmon filets twice a week now and maybe every other week we eat tuna steaks — don’t overcook those things or you’ll be eating some primitive form of rubber. We have turkey or chicken in our marinara sauce with pasta, and she’s always scouting for the healthiest options. Now we’ve discovered something even healthier when it comes to “meat.”
And I’m not talking about that fu-fu soy stuff, or some kind of veggie burger or veggie steaks. We don’t eat pork very often, and not because it is levitically unclean.
Which meat source is the healthiest? FDA stats:
Meat Fat Calories Cholesterol Sat Fat Protein Iron
????? 2.42 g 143 kcal 82 mg 0.91 g 28.44 g 3.42 mg
Beef 11.73g 217 cal 85 mg 4.63g 26.11g 2.71 mg
(90% lean)
Chicken 3.57g 165 cal 85 mg 1.01g 31.02g 1.04mg
Do you know what the ????? — yep, that’s right: Bison or Buffalo.
Any experiences or advice on bison?
So Sunday evening we got out our first Buffalo Burgers, from our local grocery store, and cooked them over medium heat so as not to ruin the moisture — it’s real lean stuff — put on some tomatoes and some onions and a little mustard. Maybe one of the finest burgers we’ve ever had. We are now committed to eating some buffalo each week.
Here’s the company we bought stuff from. The Buffalo Guys.



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matt

posted July 31, 2007 at 1:50 am


yummy!
I’ve had bison burgers often enough, and have had a buffalo ribeye once, and it was very good. I never realized just how good this stuff was for me :-). I’ll definitely be picking up some buffalo meat to cook at home. I’ve only had this meat at restaurants before.



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Anonymous

posted July 31, 2007 at 7:26 am


University Update – Cholesterol – A Healthier Option?

[...] West Nile Virus Contact the Webmaster Link to Article cholesterol A Healthier Option? » Posted at Jesus Creed on Tuesday, July 31, 2007 Kris, my dear wife, is a hawk when it comes to healthier foods … ? FDA stats: Meat Fat Calories Cholesterol Sat Fat Protein Iron ????? 2.42 g 143 kcal 82 mg 0.91 View Original Article » [...]



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sonja

posted July 31, 2007 at 7:29 am


It is yummy and I’m told that if you mix a little olive oil into the ground meat it holds the moisture a little better. I have not actually tried this myself … just passing on a tip.



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J-Marie

posted July 31, 2007 at 7:41 am


Ostrich is even tastier & healthy too! There are many local farms here in the ‘burbs.
‘Course if you were in Africa, I’d recommend crocidile. (For real!)



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Scot McKnight

posted July 31, 2007 at 7:49 am


sonja,
I drizzled a very small amount of olive oil on the burger and I think it helped.



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Jenny

posted July 31, 2007 at 9:01 am


Hey!
I had a buffalo burger some years ago and thought it was much nicer than beef. If you get a chance to try moose meat, it is also nice and lean and I’d take it over beef any day.



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Tom Hein

posted July 31, 2007 at 9:24 am


Venison (deer meat) is what we eat out here in Iowa. They ruin the farmer’s fields by consuming acres of cropss and they cause thousands of car accidents each year when they wander in front of cars. My wife even had one hit the side of our van one time. They are big pests, but good eating.



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Scot McKnight

posted July 31, 2007 at 9:27 am


Tom,
In Chicago we call that roadkill.



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Tom Hein

posted July 31, 2007 at 9:46 am


I really hate to say this, but a buddy of mine, actually has picked a recently deceased Bambi off the side of the road (with the county sheriff’s permission) and chopped it up for deer steaks and bologna.



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Maria Drews

posted July 31, 2007 at 9:48 am


I’m a vegetarian for environmental reasons, and although I think it is great to be searching for the healthiest food I am weary of people turning to bison as a source of meat. They are healthy because right now most bison are free-range. Beef would be as healthy is they were allowed to grow naturally and graze instead of being raised in a more industrial way and fattened up quickly using grain and corn. Unfortunately if people catch on that bison are a healthy source of meat and demand for them increases industries may begin raising bison as they do cattle and bison will cease to be the healthy meat-choice they are today. See the problem?
Thanks!



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James

posted July 31, 2007 at 10:06 am


Bison steaks are good as well. We bought a couple of medallions not long ago and they were great in a marinade & grilled.



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James

posted July 31, 2007 at 10:09 am


Tom Hein,
There is, or used to be, a charity somewhere out west (Montana I think?) that does that to provide fresh meat from accidents to people in need.



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ChrisB

posted July 31, 2007 at 12:05 pm


I love buffalo, but it’s not cheap. Fortunately, here in Houston there are a few restaurants that serve it, making it a little more economical.



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Larry Chouinard

posted July 31, 2007 at 12:15 pm


Fortunately here in the Northwest we have restuarants and plenty of meat markets that sell bison and elk. It’s a toss-up between a bison or elk burger. Gorging on bison and elk are the only reason Lewis and Clark made it to the coast. Although according to Stephen Ambrose the mosquito almost did them in.



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Peggy

posted July 31, 2007 at 1:39 pm


Maria, #10,
Thank you for your comment–it is timely.
Scot,
Yes, Bison/Buffalo is good…but Maria is correct when she states that it is good because Bison is grass fed. I challenge you to get some totally grass-fed beef and see if it is not the most amazing thing. I order it on-line and have it shipped frozen from: mesquiteorganicbeef.com
But that doesn’t mean that we have beef every day, because we don’t. But I would put organic, grass-fed beef back on the menu because it has some amazing nutrients that our brain need…and it is low-fat because it is the grain feed that makes most beef fat! Cattle were not meant to eat grain…it changes the makeup of the protein (both for the meat and for the dairy products…but don’t get me started on raw, grass-fed milk 8) )
I actually prefer beef to bison–a little milder flavor–but they are both better than any other red meat out there!
Have Kris check out Sally Fallon’s book “Nourishing Traditions” if she’s on the look-out for the skinny on good nutrition: http://www.westonaprice.org/bookreviews/nourishing_traditions.html
Blessings



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Peggy

posted July 31, 2007 at 1:45 pm


…one more thing. Yes, wild game is also good, for the same reason: they eat like they’re supposed to, not fattened up on a farm/feed lot!
Eating “low” on the food chain is considered important, and these grass-fed animals fit the bill.
And Scot, beware of any and all “farm” fish–I hear that all Atlantic Salmon are farmed (the “wild” version is extinct)…that leave you with Alaskan or NW Salmon…but you will have to compete with the sea lions here on the Columbia River ;)



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Light

posted July 31, 2007 at 1:46 pm


I second what Peggy said. Get yourself some grass-fed beef. The nutrient properties are amazing. We buy a half a steer at a time, and we’ll never go back to grain-fed beef.



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John W Frye

posted July 31, 2007 at 2:41 pm


Try wild Copper River Salmon. It is the best. Julie and I try to have it at least once very two weeks. Even better is to catch the salmon in the Copper River, gut it, fillet it, and cook over an open camp fire. I have a very good friend who did just that :)



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Peggy

posted July 31, 2007 at 2:48 pm


John, there is nothing better than fresh salmon cooked over an open camp fire…yummm…



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Dana Ames

posted July 31, 2007 at 4:51 pm


Bison stew. This was my son’s request for his birthday dinner. Cut meat into chunks, dredge in seasoned flour, sear in a little olive oil, add broth and vegetables and season to taste (include a little sage). You don’t have to cook it all day; when the vegetables are done, it’s done. Thicken it more if you want.
We have a local bison ranch, so we know what they eat and exactly how fresh they are. We also have local grass-fed beef. Yup, it’s pricey- and as people above have said, very much worth it. We’re eating red meat less often and in smaller portions- can’t quit it entirely, my husband would leave :) -but when we do, it’s usually the local grass-fed beef.
I’ve had both venison and elk. Elk is much tastier to my palate…
One of my fondest childhood memories is of my dad coming home, after fishing on a summer Saturday afternoon with my uncle, with some fresh Montana trout for my mom to cook us for dinner. I’d put that up against your salmon, Peggy :)
Dana



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Peggy

posted July 31, 2007 at 11:33 pm


Ah, Dana…who can compete with a fondest childhood memory 8)
I have some childhood memories of fresh caught walleyed trout from Lake Gogebic in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan that I can still smell…
I’m trying not to be envious of your local sources of grass-fed cattle ;)



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RJS

posted August 1, 2007 at 8:05 am


Peggy,
Walleyes are not trout – but are great. I hope to catch some on vacation next week.



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Peggy

posted August 1, 2007 at 10:08 am


RJS,
…I guess that proves my point about fond childhood memories, eh? I didn’t catch them…just ate them…and believed what I heard others tell about them! So, what are they???
Have a wonderful vacation!



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RJS

posted August 1, 2007 at 10:34 am


It is a large perch-like fish native to Canada and the Northern US (certainly MN where I usually fish, and the the MI UP). A tasty fish – not too “fishy”.



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Scot McKnight

posted August 1, 2007 at 10:36 am


RJS,
Yes, perch. Big ones. Nothing like fishing for them with a jig and “minner” as they say. They gum that bait, start moving with it, and then slam, you’ve got it. Great eating when fresh.



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John W Frye

posted August 1, 2007 at 11:01 am


A couple of summers ago I took my then 6 year old grandson, Ben, fishing at an inland lake just outside Grand Rapids, MI. We caught some perch and a friend who lived on the lake filleted them for us. We brought the fillets home, breaded them in corn meal and pan fried them. YUMMY!! Ben was then, pardon the pun, hooked on fishing.



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Peggy

posted August 1, 2007 at 12:10 pm


RJS and Scot,
Thanks for the info…perch…I’m trying to think if that sounds familiar–but I am not the fisherman. And I loved them particularly because they were not too “fishy”.
John,
Corn meal and pan-fried–that’s exactly how they used to cook those huge walleyed perch. Yummy, indeed. By the way, I grew up in Grand Rapids…which lake did you fish?



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John W Frye

posted August 1, 2007 at 1:05 pm


Peggy,
It was Murray Lake off of Cannonsburg Rd going toward Lowell.
All,
If you love fishing, you’ll really enjoy David Duncan’s novel THE RIVER WHY.



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Barb

posted August 1, 2007 at 6:31 pm


I’m sitting here eating Kraft Mac & Cheese while reading this, and feeling very convicted. This is what happens when one doesn’t grocery shop often enough…



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