Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Dugout Wisdom

posted by xscot mcknight

Thomas Boswell, simply the best baseball writer in American history, got it right when he said this: “All baseball fans can be divided into two groups: those who come to batting practice and the others. Only those in the first category have much chance of amounting to anything.”
“Cheating is baseball’s oldest profession. No other game is so rich in skulduggery, so suited to it or so proud of it.”
“Several rules of stadium building should be carved on every owner’s forehead. Old, if properly refurbished, is always better than new. Smaller is better than bigger. Open is better than closed. Near beats far. Silent visual effects are better than loud ones. Eye pollution hurts attendance. Inside should look as good as outside. Domed stadiums are criminal.”
Think Wrigley. Think the homerdome in Minneapolis. I rest my case. There is no stadium like Wrigley. Full stop. Don’t even get me started about Boston or Y-nk– Stadium.



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Tim Gombis

posted March 31, 2007 at 4:16 am


Great American Ballpark down here in Cincy is nice, but yeah, there is NO place like Wrigley!
Also, about cheating–how is it that there are lovable scoundrels who have cheated at whom baseball winks and sort of chuckles (e.g., Gaylord Perry, Joe Niekro, Sammy Sosa for his corked bat, etc.), but the whole steroid thing is more sinister (McGwire, Sosa, Bonds)? What’s the line between the two? I “feel” that there is one, but what is it?
Even last year with Kenny Rogers and that pine tar (or whatever it was) on his hand; that was a controversy that sort of fizzled out, but steroids seem to be in a different league altogether. While many of us feel that there’s a qualitative difference, can anyone articulate it?



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James Strange

posted March 31, 2007 at 4:41 am


Hello Dr. Mcknight,
A question out of context. If you were to write a dissertation on JOhn what are some of the number of issues that will be of interest to you?
From a reader who reads your blog frequently and is passionate about John’s Gospel.
Thanks



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Patrick Lowthian

posted March 31, 2007 at 5:44 am


Scot,
Can you recommend some good baseball bloggers? I’m not looking for game updates or trade rumors–I’m looking for commentary and insight on the great game. ESPN.com has some good stuff, but I’m not a subscriber (don’t intend to become one), and you need to be one to look at their stuff.
Maybe you could add a category to your righthand column: “baseball blogs”.
Patrick



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Scot McKnight

posted March 31, 2007 at 7:56 am


James,
Talk about out of context. I suggest reading the two articles in Currents in Biblical Research and the chp in the volume Grant Osborne and I edited for Baker — the articles on John’s Gospel that is. Those will give you a good feel for where John studies are now.
Second, what do you like about John? Stick to that major theme and work it until something turns up.



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Jeff Moulton

posted March 31, 2007 at 8:34 am


I’m not sure I completely agree with the stadium thought. I’m a Cub fan in a family of Cardinal fans. My brother (Cards) thinks Wrigley is a better experience. As a Cub fan, I would rather watch a game at Busch II (have not yet been to Busch III, so that could change).
Granted my experience is limited, two of the three ballparks I have been in are gone now, Riverfront Stadium is the third. I am not sorry to see that monstrosity gone.



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Eric Wakeling

posted March 31, 2007 at 10:05 am


I know I’m a west-coaster and I have been to Wrigley and it was sort of like my trip to Mecca, but I must say that the Padres Petco Park is an amazing stadium. It has so many creative elements from older stadiums that it caters to everyone. SRO seats all around the stadium for 5 bucks. Beach chair seats in the outfield. A park in the outfield for 5 bucks where you can see the game and your kids can play. Official seats out of a bar that you enter outside the stadium, but then you appear magically in the park. Plenty of hotels with rooftop bars around the stadium where you can see the game. And of course a view of the ocean from the upper deck. And all this glowing praise from an Angels fan who lives just outside of Anaheim.
OPENING DAY IS TOMORROW!! “I do read your blog for the more scholarly/biblical elements.”



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Scott M. Collins

posted March 31, 2007 at 10:17 am


Scot,
I lived in the DC area for 3 years and I still read Boswell and the Washington Post. However, from everything I’ve been told, there’s Roger Angell and then a huge gap until you get to every other baseball writer. Amazing prose. I’m sure you’d love his style.



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tim atwater

posted March 31, 2007 at 10:44 am


hi all
i too lived in dc, read boswell, including at least two of his books… trekked to Balt’mer to see the O’s and still think Earl Weaver the most biblically astute guy in baseball…
as a still v new to this game small church pastor (just 5 years so still almost a rookie)…i look to earl the pearl’s team-building wisdom and game theory…
Team-building: All those pennant and Series winners out of (Boswell’s phrase i think) “lifetime .250 hitters who hit .350 in game on situations” Situation players who came up throught the farm teams (indigenous talent)… a lot more like Christian team building… life time .250 hitters who, platooned, used in situations… can break the game open…
Game theory: Big Inning Theory — pitching (defense –spiritual disciplines) and three runs homers…(Pentecost type moments…)
I also quoted Chairman Earl last week in a sermon on Zacchaeus (riffing on the complex of categories Z falls into, borrowing from Joel Green’s NIC commentary)to a full count on Zack…EW:
“you’re never as good as you look when you’re winning — or as bad as you look when you’re losing.” (assuming, in Weaver’s World — we always show up for practice, on time, every day.
I’m also a Luke and John nut… do you have a link for those John refs? my faves (so far) are Robert Tannehill and now Joel Green on Luke, and Alan Culpepper on John…
blessings,
tim



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Scot McKnight

posted March 31, 2007 at 11:35 am


Eric,
I’ve been there. Nice park; good weather. But it’s not Wrigley.
Scott,
I like Roger Angell — step-son of one of my heroes, EB (Andy) White — but I find Boswell closer to the game. Angell, like Giamatti, breathes the spirit of the game. Boswell the smells of the game.



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RJS

posted March 31, 2007 at 12:12 pm


As a (nearly) life-long Twins fan I will not defend the dome – but still … give me a Twins game any day.



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kent

posted March 31, 2007 at 2:24 pm


I think going to a minor league game is more fun than the majors. The stadium in Grand Rapids is awesome for single A club.



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RJS

posted March 31, 2007 at 2:40 pm


I agree kent – and the Eugene Emeralds (class A short season) were a lot of fun to watch. When more fans showed up than the stadium could hold the officials would rope off part of right field and seat fans on the grass.



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Scot McKnight

posted March 31, 2007 at 3:12 pm


Having been a few minor league parks myself, I’d have to say the Lansing Lugnuts are about as good as it can get.



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Mike Mangold

posted March 31, 2007 at 11:54 pm


Some of my best childhood memories involve Wrigley Field. When younger, my dad would drive us there from Barrington and we would hit the White Castle on the way there. Of course, that was not only to relish a “slider” but also to stave off any yearnings for a Ron Santo pizza: basically a piece of cardboard with cheese and ketchup on it.
Since my dad was a photographer for a local newspaper, we’ve got photos of my brother and me with celebrities like Ernie Banks, Billy Williams, Rich Nye, and Glenn Beckert. Oh the heartbreak of the ’69 Cubs still lingers…
When we were old enough, my brother and I would hop the Chicago and Northwestern train to the Irving Park station and walk to Wrigley. Beat paying the nuns for parking.
I’ve been to about 15 other major league ballparks and nothing, nothing beats the friendly confines.



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Sean Cannon

posted April 1, 2007 at 2:45 am


big up GABP. it’s not a bad park and definitely a big upgrad from riverfront stadium. i’m not a huge baseball fan, but i do enjoy watching my hometown (well, closest to hometown) Reds there, or just staying home and listening on 700WLW to Marty and Joe…er…Stu…uh…Jeff…um…Tom, or whoever it is.



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Eric Wakeling

posted April 1, 2007 at 8:41 am


OPENING DAY IS HERE



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Brad Vander Waal

posted April 1, 2007 at 8:57 pm


Grew up in Iowa and my family enjoyed going to Royals games. Good news now is no one else goes so you can get good tickets. Lived in Denver for a year and would have to say that Coors is a pretty good place to watch a game. Even though the cheap rock pile is a little far away, saw Sosa hit 3 homers in 3 innings from there. Must agree also though that the Twins are a fun team to watch after living in the Cities for a few years. Now in Illinois and grew up with the cubs so maybe people will feel like giving the new pastor some free tickets:)



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Mike Mangold

posted April 1, 2007 at 10:05 pm


Pastor Vander Waal: would that (free tickets to a baseball game for a pastor) be considered a tithe? How interested are you in a Brewer’s game instead? Ask Dr.McKnight for my email address if you are…
Mike



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Stephan

posted April 3, 2007 at 10:50 am


I work in Minneapolis and can walk from my office to both the Metrodome and the site of the future Twins’ ballpark (if they ever get the land deal worked out). When they tear down the dome (and they will) I want to be there with a sledge hammer in my hand helping smash it to bits. Many terrible things have been said about the Metrodome over the years, and none of them come close to describing how atrocious it really is.
I lived in Colorado for several years and literally wept the first time I entered Coors Field. It is so beautiful I could hardly stand it.
I planned a trip to Wrigley years ago with some friends. It was 1994. The players went on strike, my plans were canceled and I have not been able to schedule another trip to Chicago since then. At least I know it will never be torn down, so I have some time.



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