Beliefnet
Is it the End of the World?

One of the hallmarks of liberal thought a century ago was that man was improving himself so much that society would get better and better.

Then the butchery known as the Great War commenced. It was followed barely a generation later by the barbarism of European and Asian dictators.

Now, in the Church, there is a sizable segment that believes in what is called “Dominionism,” which is the idea that the Church will grow stronger and stronger, and hand-off the Kingdom on Earth to the returning Christ (whenever that is).

And yet, what are we witnessing? A rising Utopia? Is the world getting better? This goes far beyond the old Reagan line, “Are you better off than you were four years ago?” I would suggest we are watching so much end-times Bible prophecy being fulfilled, it’s hard to keep up with it all!

One of the watershed moments of my life occurred last evening, as I sat with my family to watch a movie. It was then I saw the S&P downgrade of the U.S. credit rating.

Then today we read that the U.S. Postal Service is near default. A few months ago it was awakening to the Japan earthquake that made the world tremble. European countries began discussing the possibility of shutting down some of their nuclear reactors.

And we all know how unstable the world economy is. Or do we?

For generations, Americans lived pretty much the same way. Little changed. Now our entitlement programs are on the verge of collapse, we wonder how we will receive mail, and a thousand other things occupy our minds.

Against this backdrop, the biblical view of society’s eventual collapse stands unshaken.

For example, in the book of Revelation, we read about the so-called “Mark of the Beast,” some type of tracking system humanity will need to engage in regular commerce. We are told it will be a mark in the hand or the forehead.

As Ron Rhodes pointed out on Jan Markell’s radio program today, one of the attractive features of going cashless, for banking systems, is the absence of counterfeit currency. Another is the fact that so many germs ride our dollar bills, electronic banking and commerce would eliminate that threat.

No, if we’re honest, the world is not getting better. It’s getting meaner. More cruel and selfish.

Won’t you consider that the God of the Bible is who He claims to be, and in Him is true peace? You have only to get your hands on a Bible translation you can comfortably read to discover the wonder and majesty of the God who can predict the future.

Among the prophecies that really scare people are those contained in that famous book, Revelation. When the Apostle John recorded a series of strange visions at the end of the first century, even the prophet could not have known how controversial the book of Revelation would become.

This came to mind a couple days ago with the news that a reservoir in Texas had turned “blood red.” The natural reasons for this were given, and they sound similar to those given by people who want to explain-away the Exodus plagues.

In any event, the article about the reservoir mentioned of course that some have speculated that it is a sign of the end.

Frankly, it’s hard to see how an incident so isolated geographically could be linked directly to the global catastrophe predicted in the book of Revelation.

It is a reminder though that such hand-wringing comes from a description in Revelation 16:3—”And the second angel poured out of his vial upon the sea; and it became as the blood of a dead man; and every living soul died in the sea.”

Whew. That’s a pretty bad ecological disaster.

For the record, I believe this particular prophecy is yet future, and it will be fulfilled literally. The Texas occurrence though, while interesting, is not an indication that the “bowl” and “seal” judgments of the book of Revelation are now cascading across the globe.


”Therefore as I live, saith the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel, Surely Moab shall be as Sodom, and the children of Ammon as Gomorrah, even the breeding of nettles, and saltpits, and a perpetual desolation: the residue of my people shall spoil them, and the remnant of my people shall possess them.” (Zephaniah 2:9)

One of my favorite things to do is look for what I call obscure prophecies in the Bible. Everyone wants to know who the antichrist is, etc., but that’s not very interesting for me. Rather, I am continually amazed at how finely calibrated Bible prophecy is.

A recent trip to Masada, at the southern end of the Dea Sea, was confirmation of this. The prophet Zephaniah predicted that the area where Sodom and Gomorrah once existed (I reject the almost-comical claim of liberal scholarship that the biblical references to these doomed cities are myth) would become a perpetual desolation and a saltpit.

That is certainly correct today. The Dead Sea region is so barren and desolate…the Dead Sea is one great saltpit.

Moreover, the reference to Moab, that ancient region that is now in the present-day country of Jordan, will one day be a possession of the people of Israel, that remnant. One can see the “hills of Moab” just on the other side of the Dead Sea.

The Bible is full of such prophecy, and it is there for anyone to see. Enrich yourself by studying it. In a day when so many people are looking for comfort and hope, try something different today: see the power and majesty of the true God, as He reveals Himself in our day through the marvelous backdrop of predictive prophecy.

The summit at Masada, overlooking the Dead Sea

Behold, I have graven thee upon the palms of my hands; thy walls are continually before me. (Isaiah 49:16)

A lot of people don’t like Jews, and a whole lot of nations loathe Israel, but I admit to a sense of satisfaction over that reality.

In the American Church today, an idea known as Replacement Theology is rampant. This view says that because of past sins of the Jews, God has “replaced” them with the Church in his overall plan for humanity. The Old Testament have been “transferred” to the Church.

Right.

This kind of arrogance is really breathtaking, and notice that the Church doesn’t embrace the punishments also promised to ancient Israel. It’s only the blessings that the Church tries on like a mink coat in a full-length mirror.

I’m happy to disappoint those Christians who hold to this view. Repeatedly—repeatedly—the Lord tells Israel and the Jews that He has never forgotten them, that He sees them all through history. The walls of the nation are ever before him.

In Jeremiah 31, He goes to great and soaring lengths to say that if the sun and moon stop giving their light, He will forgot Israel. In other words, it will never happen.

This particular prophecy is one I find so delicious. Israel’s enemies rage, but they are not long for this world.

In the meantime, the Church should take the proper stance and see that in Israel’s supernatural preservation, us Gentiles can see that God will also take care of us as individuals. The Church presently has it backwards.

The walls of Jerusalem—Israel’s eternal capitol—face the sun every morning. At night, as her enemies plot, the moon hangs like a sentinel.

I like that a lot.