Beliefnet
Is it the End of the World?

I’m never afraid to say that even though probably a majority of people around the world today would equate the study of Bible prophecy with flat-earth advocacy, I know prophecy is legitimate and relevant for our times.

Just this past week, developments in the Middle East point to a prophecy that teachers and students have anticipated for a long time.

In Ezekiel 38-39, we find the famous “Gog/Magog” prophecy, which points to a future event: the invasion of Israel, by neighbors and European countries. In verse 5 of chapter 38, Iran (Persia), Ethiopia, and Libya are mentioned in this confederacy. We know Iran’s intentions, and Libya this week took a turn toward shariah law, thus growing even more hostile to Israel.

Scholars for a long time have been ridiculed, however, because they believe this event is yet future. In verse 12, we see that Gog comes to Israel to “take a spoil.”

This has puzzled prophecy watchers for a long time, since aside from its high-tech industry, Israel isn’t particularly wealthy. At least, no natural resources to make anyone sit up and take notice.

That was before the discovery of a vast natural gas field in the Mediterranean. Suddenly, off-shore, Israel is primed to become immensely wealthy. And the nations surrounding her will not abide that; they will determine to take down the flag of Israel permanently.

Yet the Lord has also promised to savagely destroy Gog’s army, as it arrives at the “mountains of Israel.”

I believe this event is on the horizon. If one sheds the liberal bias against prophecy, one can see fairly clearly that Ezekiel 38 and 39 are in fact real, future history. Israel will be re-gathered. The surrounding nations—already hostile—will gather together for war. A northern leader will hatch an evil plan of invasion. And Israel will survive.

Mocking Bible prophecy doesn’t render it invalid.

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