Advertisement

Deepak Chopra and Intent

Deepak Chopra and Intent

Weekly Health Tip: Should You Always Buy Organic?

 

 

 

 

 

Brought to you by Deepak Chopra, M.D., Alexander Tsiaras, and TheVisualMD.com

The benefits of organic farming are undeniable. Crops grown without chemical pesticides do not contaminate the earth with toxic substances. Organic farmers use crop rotation and other natural processes to keep the soil healthy and fertile. Studies show that some (but not all) organically grown fruits and vegetables are higher in certain nutrients than the conventionally grown versions. But organic farming is more expensive than conventional farming, and that fact is reflected in the price of organic foods. As organic farming becomes more common, organic produce will be more widely available and prices should come down.

Advertisement

For now, shop strategically. Some conventionally grown fruits and vegetables retain very low amounts of pesticides by the time they reach the marketplace. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is an advocacy group that aims to protect public health and the environment. Using government analyses of pesticide levels in foods, the EWG has compiled a list of the fruits and vegetables most and least likely to have pesticide residues: The Dirty Dozen and the Clean 15.

According to EWG, “You can lower your pesticide consumption by nearly four-fifths by avoiding the 12 most contaminated fruits and vegetables and instead eating the least contaminated produce.” Check out the results of their research, below, before your next trip to the market.

Advertisement

The Dirty Dozen
These fruits and vegetables tend to be high in pesticide residue when grown conventionally. Buy them from an organic source whenever you can.

Celery
Peaches
Strawberries
Apples
Blueberries
Nectarines
Sweet bell peppers
Spinach, kale, collard greens
Cherries
Potatoes
Imported grapes
Lettuce

The Clean 15*
When grown conventionally, these items remain low in pesticide residue. There are fewer advantages to buying them from an organic source.

Onions
Avocado
Sweet corn
Pineapple
Mango
Sweet peas
Asparagus
Kiwi fruit
Cabbage
Eggplant
Cantaloupe
Watermelon
Grapefruit
Sweet potato
Sweet onion

Advertisement

*Data and title courtesy of the Environmental Working Group (EWG)

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Pesticide Data Program has analyzed the pesticide levels of domestic food products since it began in 1991. The group tests washed, ready-to-eat produce. Between 1993 and 2003, about 58 percent of the sampled fruits and vegetables were found to contain pesticides, although in greatly varying amounts. There are six produce items in particular that had detectable residues on 90 percent of the samples for two years or more. These are apples, celery, cherries, nectarines, peaches and strawberries. Fewer than 1 percent of the produce sampled contained levels higher than those recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Advertisement

For additional information: USDA Pesticide Data Program: Pesticide Residues on Fresh and Processed Fruit and Vegetables, Grains, Meats, Milk, and Drinking Water.

We have continuing discussions following this article on our Facebook Page.

Learn more about balancing your diet with healthful produce:
TheVisualMD.com: Foods to Enjoy

Advertisement
Comments Post the First Comment »
post a comment

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

The President's Tweets and the Future of Shame
Last week the new Twitter account @POTUS of President Obama became a lightning rod for the worst in social media behavior. Within minutes of its setup, as reported in the New York Times, the account was flooded with vitriolic racist tweets, ...

posted 11:02:41am May. 25, 2015 | read full post »

How the Universe Pulled a Vanishing Act
The issues facing modern physics are so baffling that they’ve crossed a threshold and now fascinate the general public. We laymen have very little at stake, personally speaking, when scientists argue over the Big Bang—without advanced ...

posted 11:01:48am May. 18, 2015 | read full post »

Is Nature About to Abandon Us?
Feeling guilty about climate change hasn’t proved to be a good motivator. The most recent report on greenhouse gas emissions puts March at a record-breaking level of emissions. Presidential urging doesn’t move Congress to take significant ...

posted 2:42:12pm May. 11, 2015 | read full post »

How to Be at Peace When the World Isn't
We seem to be living out the Chinese curse, "May you live in interesting times." The curse is probably mythical, but our interesting times contain much turbulence. The horrific refugee situation in Syria, the rise of the even more horrific ISIS ...

posted 11:11:24am May. 04, 2015 | read full post »

Does Everything Happen for a Reason?
By Deepak Chopra, MD, and Jordan Flesher, MA Psychology   The human mind can adapt to almost anything, but not chaos. No one can lead a completely random and chaotic life. The messy room of a teenager may look completely chaotic, but ...

posted 1:54:05pm Apr. 27, 2015 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.