Deepak Chopra and Intent

Deepak Chopra and Intent


5 Powerful Ways to Get Your Kids to Eat Healthy

posted by Mallika Chopra

With childhood obesity, autism and other childhood disorders on the rise, everyone from

iStock_000005241132XSmall.jpeg

doctors to teachers and parents are seeking solutions for better health. At the most basic level, everyone can agree that kids can benefit from eating healthier.Truth is, with all the glitzy candy and processed foods competing for your kids’ attention how do you get them to eat healthy meals?Over the years, we’ve found many solutions, but we also salute the creative parents who’ve shared their tips for making healthy food for kids.Here are 7 powerful ways to get your kids to eat healthy:1. Make new twists on old favorites. Think about the foods your kids love and make something that tastes and looks similar, but uses different ingredients. Body Ecology parent, Vicki Hartzog’s teenage daughter, Tasha, made her favoritecoffee cake by substituting butter with ghee, processed flour with quinoa flour and sugar with Lakanto. With a little practice, you might find it easier than you think to make yummy, healthy food for kids. 2. Be creative. Use some of those “tricks” being used by advertisers to make things sound exciting to kids. One ingenious Body Ecology mom made pasta out of zucchini and called them “good luck noodles” because of their green color.Let’s face it, kids tend to gravitate toward the fun wrappings and funny names on packaged foods, so if you are making pumpkin soup, you might call it “Halloween Pumpkin soup.” Another trick for making healthy food for kids is creating fun shapes. A turning slicer is a unique little gadget that lets you make curly “pasta-like” shapes out of carrots, zucchini, yellow squash and other vegetables in just minutes! Or make professional looking garnishes and pizza toppings out of just about any vegetable. Your kids may just find excitement in eating vegetables again. 3. Take your time. If your kids are used to eating candy and chips, it may take time to get their taste buds to acclimate to healthier foods…especially those with a sour taste…like our fermented foods and beverages. Instead of rushing it, remember the Step By Step Principle…consider taking it slow and building over time. Trust that every small step you take toward healthy eating will have big rewards over a lifetime. Add some new foods into those “old favorites” a little at a time and see what happens. One clever Body Ecology parent, Diane Farr , added one teaspoon of Young Coconut Kefir to her son, Thomas’ regular “junky” juice and continued to increase the amount until he was drinking one to two cups of Young Coconut Kefir per day! And loving it, by the way. Soon juice wasn’t even needed. 4. Arm yourself with recipes. Gather up some healthy recipes and experiment until you find the ones your kids take a liking too. Make small amounts and have “taste tests” with your kids, giving an award to the recipe your kids like the best. (Maybe a gold star on the recipe card and a special place in that recipe file box. Definitely do keep a file with all of the award winners close on hand.You can find delicious recipes for kids transitioning into the Body Ecology Way of Life in our Lakanto Cookbook, which is chock full of healthy and delicious appetizers, entrees and desserts. They were designed to make transitioning onto The Diet much easier…so please use them as inspiration for your own ideas. 5. Practice the art of camouflage. Sometimes kids won’t eat a food because of how it looks or sounds, but they are actually fine with the taste. Fermented foods and drinks are full of healthy benefits…but they may seem difficult to add to a child’s diet. The good news is that many Body Ecology parents have had success with the art of camouflage.CONTINUE READING ON INTENT.COM! For more on childhood obesity, check out Intent.com’s Exclusive Series: How To Prevent Childhood Obesity.

us.lrd.yahoo.jpeg



Advertisement
Comments read comments(1)
post a comment
Maricela Romano

posted June 14, 2010 at 8:24 am


If only more people could read about this!



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

Five Spiritual Mysteries: #2 Why Does God Let Bad Things Happen? (Part 2)
    One of the biggest stumbling blocks for people who want to believe in God is the existence of bad things in our lives.  The evening news carries enough stories about war, crime, famine, oppression, and much else that a loving God wouldn't permit. But as we saw in the first post,

posted 12:03:44pm Apr. 14, 2014 | read full post »

Five Spiritual Mysteries: #2 Why Does God Let Bad Things Happen?
In every spiritual tradition, different as they are, God is taken to be the moral compass for human beings. He may or may not be a punisher.  He may or may not sit in judgment, watching and weighing our every move. He may or may not be a He, since the God of Judaism, for example, is without form. B

posted 12:18:30pm Apr. 07, 2014 | read full post »

Five Spiritual Mysteries: #1 Is Karma Fair? (Part 2)
Even at a time when religion is declining in the West, most people remember the Biblical saying "As you sow, so shall you reap." they cling to a belief taught in childhood, that good is rewarded and evil punished. In the first post we started to look at the possibility that what was learned in child

posted 10:30:03am Mar. 31, 2014 | read full post »

Five Spiritual Mysteries: #1 Is Karma Fair?
We live in an especially dispirited time when people say, totally without irony, "Life is unfair" and "No good deed goes unpunished."  Is there proof that life is, in fact, fair or unfair?  The question doesn't even make sense if you believe that the universe is cold, random and devoid of meaning.

posted 1:09:26pm Mar. 24, 2014 | read full post »

‘Collision course’ in the science of consciousness: Grand theories to clash at Tucson conference
   by Deepak Chopra, MD and Stuart Hameroff, Anesthesiology, Psychology, Center for Consciousness Studies The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona   The nature of consciousness, the reality it conveys, and our place in the universe remains unknown. Since ancient times, two

posted 9:03:05pm Mar. 17, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.