Deepak Chopra and Intent

Deepak Chopra and Intent


Benedict’s Choice Is No Choice

posted by Admin

An article in the Washington Post in response to their question: In his speech to U.S. bishops last week, Pope Benedict XVI said: “Any tendency to treat religion as a private matter must be resisted . . . To the extent that religion becomes a purely private affair, it loses its very soul.” Do you agree or disagree? Why? Benedict’s Choice Is No Choice



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Bob

posted April 24, 2008 at 8:48 am


“Therefore the phrase “private matter” means, “Don’t go off on your own.”
No, it means don’t let anti-Catholics *cough cough* keep you from fully living and expressing your faith.
“this Pope helped to enunciate a papal edict in the late 80s that condemned meditation”
Actually, the Catholic Church promotes meditation, as per Part 4, Section 1, Chapter 3, Article 1 of the Catechism:
“2707 There are as many and varied methods of meditation as there are spiritual masters. Christians owe it to themselves to develop the desire to meditate regularly” (CCC)
“it’s not entirely clear what the Gnostics believed or who they were”
Yes it is, actually. Many practiced extreme aestheticism and preached that the material world was an evil illusion to be overcome. For Catholic response to such an abhorrent thought, go Google St. Athanasius.
“forcing its parishioners into Hobson’s choice.”
No, actually, because the Church believes in the free will of the individual. It has made it clear that we make our own choices based on our conscience, granted, it be informed by Church teaching — again, I recommend actually reading the Cathechism before you comment.
God Bless,
Bob



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Matt

posted April 24, 2008 at 9:52 am


Chopra, makes untrue statements.
Catholicsm isn’t losing numbers in America.
The truth is 1 in 4 Americans is still Catholic & due to immigration from Mexico will be stay pretty consistent.
Chopra, stop commenting on Catholicsm.
I read your book & it was total garbage.
Nothing more then your opinions backed by no scientific evidence.
When will you realize you are not special & your opinion is worth very little to most Americans.



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I_Like_Dragyn

posted April 24, 2008 at 4:44 pm


Yes it is, actually. Many practiced extreme aestheticism and preached that the material world was an evil illusion to be overcome. For Catholic response to such an abhorrent thought, go Google St. Athanasius.
No, it’s not, actually. You don’t find out about historic Gnostics from those who opposed Gnosticism any more than I should be expected to get an unbiased definition of Judaism from Osama Bin Laden. There is a lot more to Gnosticism than a belief that the material world is imperfect. Try reading The Gnostic Gospel of St. Thomas to at least get a better picture of Gnosticism.



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Ganapati

posted April 25, 2008 at 7:03 am


“Can any of us be our own spiritual teachers? There’s something arrogant and deluded in complete autonomy, as if we can rely on our own egos to defeat the shortcomings of the ego. After all, we don’t ask surgeons to operate on themselves. Without guidance from a wisdom tradition — and whatever else it may be, the Church does embody such a tradition — the individual seeker runs a huge risk of being distracted and misled, not by the powers of darkness but by an ego-personality that will do anything not to let go of its cherished habits, beliefs, and conditioning.”
This is the struggle I see happening in Christianity, Islam, and many other religions. The Pope is trying to on the one hand to keep tradition in place and on the other hand be able to still be a viable source of spiritual guidance. That’s not an easy line to walk, if it was we’d already be there with all the world’s religions. America has so often been a place where religions seem somewhat removed from the cultural climates that often shape traditions and in many ways can sometimes shine a light on parts of traditions that are viewed as incompatible with the overall message of the religion or viewed as inconsistent or even outright wrong. Just as it took the American Catholics to bring to light the sexual abuse, I think it is the American Catholics that will help it in balancing tradition with spiritual guidance. We already see this in other Christian denominations like the Anglican/Episcopal Church, some branches of Lutherans and Presbyterians and Methodists. And we see this outside of Christianity with American Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims, etc also shining a light on aspects of traditions that seem contrary to the overall message of the religion. Aspects that have been so ingrained in the local cultures where the tradition emerged that they hardly can tell the difference and many times unblinkly accept the traditions. Of course it’s painful when the light is shone upon parts of tradition that have either been abused, misused, or are incompatible, inconsistent, or just outright wrong from the central messages of the religion….especially when that light is shone upon by the followers of the religion itself. But I think that God has purposely done this because God doesn’t want us to just follow tradition…God gave us religion to be a spiritual guide so that way we can find our way back to God and so that way we can grow spiritually in our lives and be a blessing to others, etc. In all the stories from all the religions, whenever God moves for people to change it is always painful and suffering often comes because we cling too much to traditions that aren’t good for us…much like we do bad habits. The Pope I think realizes this is what is happening, but he is still trying to figure out just how to move the Church forward without losing everything at the same time. It’s a delicate balance between being a tradition and being a spiritual guide. I am confident that the world’s religions will ultimately reach that balance.



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I_Like_Dragyn

posted April 25, 2008 at 11:13 am


There’s something arrogant and deluded in complete autonomy, as if we can rely on our own egos to defeat the shortcomings of the ego.
But if it is realized that what is known as an ego does not inherently exist, then what is it that we would we rely on and what would need defeating?



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Rev. Eddie

posted April 26, 2008 at 6:03 am


I do not agree with the pope; I think that spirituality is and should be an individual journey of each person. If we wish to share our journey with others, then there religions of our choice to do so; or teach and share totally independent of existing religions if we do not identify with any.
What the Pope said is a daring attempt of the church to continue controlling what people should, or should not believe. This I find to be anti spiritual, besides invasive to free will that each individual has as a right. I hope that this position changes in the future.
Rev. Eddie



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Bob

posted April 26, 2008 at 10:01 am


I_Like_Dragyn:
“You don’t find out about historic Gnostics from those who opposed Gnosticism any more than I should be expected to get an unbiased definition of Judaism from Osama Bin Laden.”
To compare a Catholic saint to a contemporary terrorist is a heck of a stretch. Look, the Church opposed Gnosticism with good reason, and I stress the word “reason”. There was a logic behind the position it took, and there are plenty of books out there on the subject written by people who aren’t Catholic if in fact you refuse to trust someone who is. Feel free to go read.
Ganapati:
God doesn’t want us to just follow tradition…God gave us religion to be a spiritual guide…”
So I’m supposed to ignore what 2,000 years of tradition tells me, but believe your claims about God? Sorry, I think I’ll think I’ll stick with the Church.
Rev. Eddie:
“…a daring attempt of the church to continue controlling what people should, or should not believe.”
Eddie, the Pope stopped by, made some speeches, celebrated the Mass a few times, and went home. Where does the controlling-what-people-think part come in?
Look, as Catholics, we have a far different mindset than someone like Falwell or Hagee. We’re happy to let practice what they want to practice, without trying to convert them.
I wish I could say the same for Deepak Chopra. The guy won’t quit trying to convince us (all Christians, not just Catholics) that we’re wrong. All we want to do is practice our faith. He keeps trying to dismantle it via books and blogs and the like.
The religious left, for all it’s talk of religious tolerance, doesn’t seem to have any. Go figure.
God Bless,
Bob



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Charles Cosimano

posted April 26, 2008 at 2:37 pm


Tradition is mold on the bathroom wall, a collection of old superstitions and outright lies.
Scriptures are the words of followers who chose what they wrote down to fit their own notions of what the teacher taught and truth is only found in them by accident.
Prophets were and are madmen.
All we have is ourselves and the only judgement that we can trust is our own.



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Bob

posted May 4, 2008 at 1:24 pm


“Tradition is mold on the bathroom wall, a collection of old superstitions and outright lies.”
Tradition is the fence that lets us play in the yard with complete freedom and with no fear.
Tradition is the banks that keep the river flowing straight and steady, keeping the water clear, fresh, and a force of nature.
Tradition is the safeguard that keeps many people from falling under the spell of charismatic maniacs like David Koresh and Jim Jones.
Tradition is the voice of thousands of generations over thousands of years; the voice of our ancestors.
Tradition is a gift. Too bad people want to throw it out the window.



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Mel

posted May 13, 2008 at 1:39 pm


Bob:
Your reply to Charles Cosimano (and to others) and your comment about Deepak Chopra were brilliant. Keep up the great work!



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