Homeshuling

Homeshuling


Hanukkah Art Workshop with Homeshuling

posted by Homeshuling

Mahatma Ghandi once said, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” While I fall woefully short of fulfilling this mandate, I do tend to be the Jewish education I want to see in the world. In the early 90′s, when I wanted a way to merge my work as an environmental educator with my growing interest in Judaism, I pitched, developed, and ran the first season of the Teva Learning Center, where I could do just that. When Ella was a toddler, and I wanted her to know Jewish songs as well as she knew all the songs on her Music Together cd, I approached our local music school and helped them develop a pilot Jewish music program for babies and toddlers. Last year, after a visit to the Eric Carle museum on Valentine’s Day, I decided I wanted my kids to have a chance to do great art projects while exploring Jewish holiday themes. So, I wrote a grant with a local art educator and ran a series of Jewish holiday art workshops.

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This will be my second year of conducting art workshops with the talented and definitely-not-cookie-cutter-art-making Lindsay Fogg Willits, at her gorgeous studio Art-Always in Northampton, Massachusetts. On November 21, from 1-3, we’ll be learning a little bit about hanukkah traditions, and creating beautiful hanukkah cards and window decorations out of a variety of media. I promise it will be fun. Wouldn’t you love to come join us?
The projects are appropriate for ages five through adult (really) and the charge is $25 for each parent/child pair, with a $10 fee for each additional family member. Pre-registration is required at the Art-Always website. Did I mention that these are funded in part by the Harold Grinspoon Foundation Arts and Culture Initiative? I hope so, because it’s a requirement of the grant.
Hope to see some of you there!


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Michelle

posted October 27, 2010 at 8:11 pm


If it did not involve an airplane trip I would so be there with Froggy. I would love to hear more about your work with Teva. I would love to do a workshop series with them.



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Mara ~ Kosher on a Budget

posted October 28, 2010 at 1:55 am


Ack, that sounds lovely! You are such a go-getter! I wish we could be there for the workshop, but look forward to wonderful pictures of your kids’ Chanukah-themed masterpieces.



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Ayala

posted October 28, 2010 at 8:56 am


Amy, what a great idea. Wish I could do a field trip from Ashland with our school!



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BookishIma

posted October 28, 2010 at 9:55 am


Yes! If only we could come. (Seriously, if the kiddo was five, I would happily take on the car time.) You make me want to take things into my own hands and start programs like Teva, the music, and the art classes around here. Maybe wherever we settle for good…
By the way, I know that Gandhi sentence has become somewhat of a cliche, but I don’t care, I still find it powerful.



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