Beliefnet
Healing and Transformation

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/96/Bloch-SermonOnTheMount.jpg

The Sermon on the Mount
Carl Bloch, 1890

As seekers in the West, we seem to have lost our way in how we interpret capitalism and our soul’s yearning for spiritual sustenance. A spiritual void came out of disconnecting from the land and losing our traditional roots. Aboriginal cultures are deeply rooted to nature and their connection to the land, and this means that they neither feel lost nor have the need to go seeking something, nor feel the need to achieve some magical goal.

Western cultures broke away from residing wholly in the body and placed more emphasis on the mental aspects. Whilst much was achieved through intellectual pursuits and human ingenuity (including the technology that allows us to engage with digital screens), what is missing are elements of the instinctual self that require integration.

Respect for the sacredness of all life-forms is part of the cultural heritage of indigenous culture. This rootedness in the earth and nature-centered ideology is far removed from the Judeo-Christian tradition of humanocentrism, which places the human being as the centre of the universe. The biblical tradition placed man as superior to other creatures, specifically in the verse of Genesis 1:26, it’s written:

“And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.”

Such an outlook breeds separation from the inferior-sounding extrinsic natural environment, especially that, according to this logic, it is man that is created in God’s image and not fish or any other creature (definitely not the creeping variety!) Historically Europeans have sought to dominate and suppress nature. This point of view has a concomitant bias against natural inclinations within the human personality. Rejecting parts of the self, particularly their natural instincts, has led to Europeans in particular suffering from a form of cultural disorientation. This creates confusion about one’s inner nature and expression, conflict about who one is, and how one fits into the world.

One of the results of this spiritual gap is the personal development industry which attempts to fill this spiritual void or bridge the gap between what we are and how we feel about ourselves. It is not necessarily doomed to fail, just so-often misleading as the spiritual sickness has a solution only found in nature, and in acts that ground and deepen one’s roots.

Carl Jung’s concept of individuation is helpful to broadly define the goal of personal development – the drive to achieve wholeness and balance. In Jungian psychology, one could understand individuation as“knowing yourself.”

What makes a person unique and identifiable as separate from another person is this process of individuation. Through undergoing experiences, a person’s innate qualities and unconscious psyche, are gradually integrated over a lifetime into a healthy whole self. Having seen many people yearn for personal transformation, it is important to recognise that no two people are alike. They may look alike, but spiritually be on a completely different page. Each path represents different phases of learning and growing.

In the West, people come from a  place of not being whole and complete – whereas in traditional cultures, there was a deep cultural understanding that we are born whole and complete – and nothing can separate us from this truth. Individuation naturally unfolds where a culture is in harmony with its environment. The Western opposition to its environment and enmity towards outsiders, creates a disharmony, a spiritual gap, and in many cases, a disunity within the maturation of personality.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/33/MaslowsHierarchyOfNeeds.svgPsychologist Maslow, who investigated healthy minds as a counterpoint to Freudian psychology’s preoccupation with studying the sick mind, found that a healthy person must have a vision and belief in the achievement of his/her goals. Maslow described this tendency for self-fulfilment or self-actualisation as “the desire to become more and more what one is, to become everything that one is capable of becoming.” 

Maslow writes:

“A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself. What a man can be, he must be. “

The change always comes internally within the self-concept inside a person’s mind:

“You will either step forward into growth, or you will step backward into safety. If you plan on being anything less than you are capable of being, you will probably be unhappy all the days of your life.” – Maslow

Maslow later expanded his vision to include a higher level of human consciousness – self-transcendence – having a spiritual goal outside of oneself.

Viktor Frankl writes in Man’s Search for Meaning that meaning is at the highest rung of human needs:
“There is nothing in the world, I venture to say, that would so effectively help one to survive even the worst conditions, as the knowledge that there is a meaning in one’s life.”

Frankl goes on to write,

“Ultimately, man should not ask what the meaning of his life is, but rather must recognize that it is he who is asked. In a word, each man is questioned by life; and he can only answer to life by answering for his own life; to life he can only respond by being responsible.”

The human need is not for purpose at all costs including the loss of humanity, but for purpose that fulfils a goal worthy of each person, a higher purpose that inspires a deeper calling.

It is in philosophy that one begins to understand what is common to humanity and also what culturally separates us. The search for meaning is arguably a Western trait, as for indigenous cultures, meaning was never lost – all of nature is imbued with meaning. In the West, if we do not feel significant and part of the whole matrix around us, then we are doomed to suffer the gloom of detachment and ennui. Solutions put forward for inner harmony may include an embracement of nature and nature-centered therapies. The awakening of one’s freedom, one’s calling – is the invocation of Spirit to break free of social conditioning and pursue one’s lower and higher nature. Self-actualisation is inherently achieved by listening less to the indoctrination of society, and more to the calling of one’s essence. What this evolves into could inspire or uplift – invite trepidation or fear.

For Westerners, this may mean appreciating the rainbows in the clouds instead of painting pretty pictures with artificial light. It may mean feeling the call and following it to evolve how we see and create our world. Seekers will keep seeking until they are home in themselves. This is still a sacred path of discovery – unknown and unknowable without bravery, discipline and self-sacrifice.

_______________________________________________________

What do you think – or feel? Feel free to comment down below!
You are awesome as you are, and I love you!
And if you love me back, please click ‘share’ up at the top!

David Starlyte (ND) – Australia’s Leading Soul-Coach, Speaker and Ascension-Guide.

PERSONAL HEALING GUIDANCE COUNSELING SESSIONS NOW AVAILABLE VIA SKYPE
(Email me for details: davidstarlyte@gmail.com)

Find out more about me: www.davidstarlyte.com

Follow me on Facebook: davidstarlyte

Original Artwork (The Sermon on the Mount) by Carl Bloch (1890) via Wiki Commons

Dancing to the End of Love - Rafal Olbinski 2010 Acrylic and Oil on CanvasHollywood has been promoting a myth since the beginning of film – an exaggerated or idealised conception of our purpose that places us at the apex of a treadmill towards a glorified and outward “success” placed at the end of our struggles. It is the capitalist dream to perpetuate consumerism and encourage retail therapy.

The myth is so ubiquitous that it’s found its way into spiritual theories and the new age. Spiritual seekers yearning for signs and asking for supernatural miracles abounding are attached to an idea of their significance. I’ve met many young seekers who believe they have a special purpose that is key to the world’s unfolding. The fulcrum of this myth is that we are not inherently worthy and the less we are worth, the more we need to buy a product to make us feel better. The less we are “enough,” the more likely it is we will feel the need to buy something. Advertisers play on our vulnerabilities and perpetually promote more “feel-good” deceptions to keep us buying.

The myth says we are inherently worthless and have no intrinsic value – hence the need to prove ourselves repeatedly and consume (a lot) goods and services abundantly to fill the gap.

The other extreme is to say we are “everything” – yet both feed on the same basic desire for meaning and purpose.

New age teachers beat the drum of emptiness and sell their programs to feed the myth that we have a significance in the world that will be announced and demonstrated in a magnanimous way.

Somewhere in between being the centre of the universe and being a speck of dust in the milky way, lies a point of view that may quench those thirsting for significance and fulfil those searching souls on the other end of spectrum.

In a material world, success is often linked to outward achievements, position and the demonstration of prosperity. Celebrity is placed on the top-wrung in terms of societal aspiration, status and appreciation. Whilst the capitalistic system is built on consumerism and at the crescendo of the pyramid is ownership, what happens when people don’t achieve their aspirations, and fall into despair or emptiness?

Similarly, in the application of the material model to a spiritual or new age world view, there is a tendency to copy the capitalist model, and define success by achievement of spiritual goals. Or merely copy and paste success via the same matrix – books sold, wealth acquired, celebrity status achieved.

The down side to these thought-forms around success is that often fame even when achieved, is short-lived. Or when we do “achieve” a goal, what if we still for the same, or even empty, and little or nothing in our internal world-view shifts? If we value ourselves on any outward acquisition, material can change in an instant. And the if the currency of success is reputation, that can also shift quickly. The higher our personal Tower of Babel is in the sky, the further it may all fall down in a heap of sand.

It’s valuable to meditate on our programmed idea of success and examine whether it is worthy and still applies to us.

For really it is perspective that creates our world, and if we cast away the debris of cultural programming, indoctrination, religious dogma, familial patterns, social conditioning, limiting thought-forms and beliefs, we will be free to start over and create something we desire.

The true meaning of Buddhist dharma is that each person has a holistic life purpose, a grounded meaning that includes being a son or daughter, a human being with presence and value – not music of the stars. When we seek some grand awakened purpose outside of ourselves, we are placing pressure on life to produce a big statement. And then if CNN doesn’t cover us, then we have failed in our dharma and the world could easily fall into a sad and lonely place. If our ego is attached to seeking a grand purpose, then it may be devastating if we fail in our chosen purpose, or worse, can’t even find our purpose.

Mature dharma is a perspective on life where we accept all that is real, and respect all that is imagined, enjoying our life’s journey with the understanding that we are here to be human and to express ourselves. Our very existence is meaningful. We don’t need a “special” or fancy label like “professor,” “lama,” “doctor” or “guru” to be purposeful and fulfilling the purpose of our lives. We don’t need a “bestselling” book or even a fake “bestselling” label on our book to be significant and completely lovable just as we are.

A grounded perspective means we don’t have to face the weight of either expectation or the weight of failure. We can just live in the moment, go with the flow of life, and let go of all the expectations and attachments to “being something in the world.” When we can let go like this, it actually opens up a space for creation and possibility. Non-defined space is what is limitless. That is the realm of living truly in the moment – meeting life where it is – staring it in the face and accepting what we see looking back at us.

Our lives may not always be simple and easy, as we are not a Hollywood cinema moment. In a typical film, do you ever see the real time people spend and the time between the action? Perhaps if you also were to create a showreel of the highlights of your life, it would give you an elevated feel of significance, leaving out all those down times and months where not much exciting was happening. Because of our fast-paced lifestyles, we want to fast-forward through the slow and gritty times, and get to the punch-line, experience the high emotion, elation and drama.

We need the down-time – relaxation – we don’t always need to be achieving something or finding something like “our dharma” – it isn’t lost and it never was.

As Lemony Snicket (A Series of Unfortunate Events) teaches,

“At times the world may seem an unfriendly and sinister place, but believe that there is much more good in it than bad. All you have to do is look hard enough. and what might seem to be a series of unfortunate events may in fact be the first steps of a journey.”

Our dharma is who we are, it’s always with us. We are not lost – and we never were – all around us is a an environment imbued with meaning and purpose.

_______________________________________________________

What do you think – or feel? Feel free to comment down below!
You are awesome as you are, and I love you!
And if you love me back, please click ‘share’ up at the top!

David Starlyte (ND) – Australia’s Leading Soul-Coach. PERSONAL SESSIONS NOW AVAILABLE VIA SKYPE (Email me for details: davidstarlyte@gmail.com)

Find out more about me: www.davidstarlyte.com

Follow me on Facebook: davidstarlyte

Original Artwork by Rafal Olbinski via Relaxic.net

 

 

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ShankhaWe in the west have been sold a myth hook, line and sinker. This myth is pervasive in the media – the same which glorifies fame and its story of success. Its delusional imprint has been borrowed by the West’s “spiritual teachers”.

Hollywood has been promoting this idea since the beginning of film: an exaggerated or idealised conception of our purpose that places us at the head of a treadmill towards “success” at the end of our struggles.

This myth is so ubiquitous that it has found its way into spiritual theories and the new age. Spiritual seekers yearning for signs and asking for supernatural miracles abound.

The myth’s fulcrum is that we have a significance in the world that will be announced and demonstrated in a magnanimous way.

The true meaning of Buddhist dharma is that each person has a life purpose, a grounded meaning that includes being a son or daughter, a human being with presence and value – not music of the stars. When we seek some grand awakened purpose outside of ourselves, we are placing pressure on life to produce a big statement. And then if CNN doesn’t cover us, then we have failed in our dharma and the world could easily fall into a sad and lonely place.

dharma
the eternal law of the cosmos, inherent in the very nature of things.”

Mature dharma is a perspective on life where we accept all that is real, and respect all that is imagined, enjoying our life’s journey with the understanding that we are here to be human and to express ourselves.

Our very existence is meaningful.

We don’t need a “special” or fancy label like “professor”, “lama”, “doctor” or “guru” to be purposeful and fulfilling the purpose of our lives. We don’t need a “bestselling” book or even a fake “bestselling” label on our book to be significant and completely lovable just as we are.

A grounded perspective means we don’t have to face the weight of either expectation or the weight of failure.

We can just live in the moment, go with the flow of life, and let go of all the expectations and attachments to “being something in the world”. When we can let go like this, it actually opens up a space for creation and possibility.

Non-defined space is what is limitless. That is the realm of living truly in the moment – meeting life where it is – staring it in the face and accepting what we see looking back at us.

Our lives may not always be simple and easy, as we are not a Hollywood cinema moment. In a typical film, do you ever see the real time people spend and the time between the action scenes?

We need the downtime – relaxation. We don’t always need to be achieving something or finding our “dharma; it isn’t lost and it never was.

Our dharma is who we are; it’s always with us.

So stop searching, relax, take a few breaths and enjoy this moment – the only moment that exists. Right now.

_______________________________________________________

What do you think – or feel? Feel free to comment down below!
You are awesome as you are, and I love you!
And if you love me back, please click ‘share’ up at the top!

David Starlyte (ND) – Australia’s Leading Soul-Coach. PERSONAL SESSIONS NOW AVAILABLE VIA SKYPE (Email me for details: davidstarlyte@gmail.com)

Find out more about me: www.davidstarlyte.com

Facebook: davidstarlyte

Photo Credits: Via Wiki Commons

https://vimeo.com/28976969Manchester burns—another wound in humanity’s chest. If our immediate reaction is shock, horror and grief, then perhaps we become angry.

This serves a purpose, and it is healthy to be angry when attacked. If we can release our pain, stand with the victims in peace, and contemplate suffering and how we can shift the collective energy, it will advance the cause of peace far more than reacting with more hatred. We cannot change evil by countering with evil. The Buddha taught: “For hatred does not cease by hatred at any time: hatred ceases by love. This is an unalterable law.”

Reacting to terrorism with more terror only fans the flames of hatred. We cannot bring peace by more antipathy. The only way to peace is via peace. The only way to bring about peace is to look within at our nature, to embrace the practice of compassion, loving-kindness and tolerance. Only love will bring us out of darkness. Only our love for ourselves and each other will heal the collective suffering and blindness. As Marianne Williamson said—“as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.”

Manchester mourns. We cannot let our comrades die in vain. Standing together for the light—to stand for the powers of goodness, the mastery of kindness, love, forgiveness and grace—these are the hallmarks of human development and evolution. Spiritual integrity, wholeness and kindness, and following the pathway to goodness is the only way forward for humanity. It is time to expand our awareness and set new intentions for our world. Healing our collective trauma takes a willingness from each one of us to heal and forgive ourselves from within. The test is one of faith. Have we lost faith in the light—or do we still believe in the light forces of hope and innate goodness?

Only awareness and coming back to fundamental spiritual values of unity, forgiveness, understanding and kindness will bring the world back to a positive light. May we all feel alive with the unity of the Divine spark within glowing and throbbing within the heart of humanity. The love of our Creator and all of creation is truly limitless.

We are one heart together as love—as it is written in the bible:

“I say, ‘You are gods;

you are all children of the Most High.’”

~ Psalms: 82:6, Holy Bible, New Living Translation

Our role on the planet is to raise the frequency of peace, love and compassion from within. As Mohandas Gandhi taught, “Each one has to find his peace from within. And peace to be real must be unaffected by outside circumstances.”

We live in a world of facades of cascading vibrational illusions that stand for reality. Our conditioning comes from old belief systems based on the ego-self that taught separation, materialism and greed, a competition-mindset—always focused on the self instead of on co-operation and co-creation. Our history is filled with control and manipulation by dominating forces seeking to build empires. When we act out of ego, we act out of limitation, we easily fall into the trap of fear, hatred and blame.

Evil is only relative, reflecting the apparent limitation of unconditional love. We have all inherited this evil. The cause is a limitation placed on that which is unlimited. The true cause of this is doubt. Judgements of limitation and extreme bias only place shields over people’s eyes and blankets over their spirits. There are many aspects of relative truth and absolute reality. This field of creation consists of worlds within worlds. From our perspective, we can only glimpse the reasons and reasoning behind events.

Vivekanada spoke of the illusory separation and ultimate union with the godhead in a speech on November 18, 1896: “We are like silkworms; we make the thread out of our own substance and spin the cocoon and in course of time are imprisoned inside. But this is not forever, for in the cocoon we shall develop spiritual realisation and like the butterfly come out free.”

We live in a world of constant change. Impermanence is our teacher—the only reality is flux. All is within the mind to be healed and changed. The Ascended Masters of our past did not want religions—they wanted enlightenment. They did not want war—they wanted peace. Peace must always begin within before being externally manifested.

We each have our own path. How we respond is not the same. There isn’t a right way or a wrong way.

Sri Chinmoy wrote so evocatively—

“Life is given to each human being
For a very special purpose.
This secret each human being
Must discover for himself.”

Let’s stand together for Manchester—in memory of all those souls who lost their lives prematurely—for the sacredness of each human life, for love and for peace.  _______________________________________________________

Photo Credits: Via Vimeo

What do you think—or feel? Feel free to comment down below!
You are awesome as you are, and I love you!
And if you love me back, please click ‘share’ up at the top!

David Starlyte (ND) – Australia’s Leading Soul-Coach. PERSONAL SESSIONS NOW AVAILABLE VIA SKYPE (Email me for details: davidstarlyte@gmail.com)

Find out more about me: http://davidstarlyte.com
Facebook: davidstarlyte