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Good Days…Bad Days With Maureen Pratt

Good Days…Bad Days With Maureen Pratt

Chronic Illness: Okay to Drop Everything (Well, Almost)!

posted by mpratt

Second close-up of pictureIf you’re dealing with a chronic illness and feeling frazzled in these last few days leading up to Christmas, I have some reassurance for you: By now, the best thing to do might be not to do anything – well, almost!

From gifts to cooking and baking to decorating, you’ve probably done a lot. Others have, too. And in this flurry, you might be feeling stressed, overworked, possibly “working on a flare.”

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Yes, by now, you might not think you can get it all done. And the truth is, you probably won’t.

So, ease up. Be gentle to yourself and others. Spend time with the people behind the cards and gifts and events. Have real conversations at this real time of light and love. Drop all that is not really necessary and you’ll probably discover new delights that were hidden by all the overwhelming stress. Don’t drop your doctor-prescribed health regimen. Don’t drop your time with God in prayer.

But drop the unnecessary, the things that get between you and Christmas.

And be truly merry.

Peace,
Maureen

 

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Chronic Illness: The Prize Is Christmas

posted by mpratt

Second close-up of pictureI have to laugh at the competitions that take place around this time of year – the homeowners’ associations’ lawn decorating contests, the holiday cookie bake-offs. I even attended a mass at a church that had a competition for the “best” Christmas card design by a grade schooler. When did Christmas become so cut-throat? When was it written into the holiday lexicon to “award” people for Christmas activities, especially in churches or other faith-based insitutions.

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Isn’t the “prize” of Christmas, well, Christmas?

All the other “stuff” – the one-upmanship, the jockeying for a prize position – isn’t really Christmas, is it?

Our Lord would never have won the award for lawn decoration. He didn’t have a lawn, and a manger is hardly what we think of as stunning artistry.

The shepherds did not look up to the angels singing of Christmas and pick out the one that they deemed “best” at vocalizing.

Mary and Joseph did not inspect the gifts from the magi and pick and choose which one was most worthy of the baby Jesus.

I completely understand wanting all that we do at Christmas to be the best possible. Even for those of us who are ill, the holidays is a time to shine more brightly, be more practiced and perfect in our celebrations and worship.

But, competition? Hmm… Instead of striving to “beat” one another, isn’t it more fitting to sit together, humbly, before Our Lord? To be thankful for the gift, not envious of a prize (small “p”), but rather in awe of the Prize – the Prize that is Christmas.

Peace,

Maureen

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Chronic Illness: Knowing the Way at Christmas

posted by mpratt

Second close-up of pictureOh, my! This is a wonderful time, but there are so many things we forget about between the last Christmas and this one. How to untangle the Christmas lights, for example (many of us find ourselves praying a lot for Mary the Untier of Knots to intervene!), or cook the beloved family tradition of turkey and trimmings. There are also directional challenges as we navigate the roads to get to the once-a-year party or family reunion. And, oh, the mysterious aspects of gift-giving and Christmas card sending – Who wants what? Who lives where? What are so-and-so’s children’s names again?

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It can be very difficult to know the way at Christmas!

But there’s one thing that we can be assured of – Christmas knows its way to us.

Not only are we surrounded by reminders of the Season, but in our churches, fellowship groups, daily devotionals, and faith traditions, we see, hear, and absorb Christmas. And the more we are mindful of finding it, the more Christmas comes to us, enfolds us, cheers us.

We have only to look at a picture of a sweet baby to see Christmas and its promise, love, and light.

Yes, we will fumble with those lights and probably burn the Christmas cookies or turkey at one point or another. We might even lose the map and forget the turn on our way to grandmother’s house, since none of us probably use the “horses that know the way to guide the sleigh” to get there!

But even if we get completely turned around and upside down, Christmas will find us. God will be with us. And we can sing “Gloria!”, even if we forget when to come in or what note to sing!

Peace,

Maureen

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Chronic Illness: The Hard Part of the Holidays

posted by mpratt

Second close-up of pictureDuring the year, we try to surround ourselves with people who care for and about us. Family, friends, a strong medical team – these people and even some strangers help us through our days of pain and illness challenges.

But at holiday time, as larger groups gather, our insulated world opens up a bit – or more. Family members we don’t see often arrive, complete strangers come into our “world” as we travel, and others intent on their own errands, shopping expeditions, and often-frantic activities move around us (sometimes even bumping right into us!).  And this reality, that we are not as “protected” as we usually are, can be the hard part of the holidays. For even as we try to make the most of this time, others who are not as careful or compassionate might however accidentally make our lives much more difficult than they already are. I’m thinking of the flight attendant who won’t assist with a clumsy bag, a cashier who gets impatient as we fumble with our bills and coins, or a traveler who hastily turns or strides right into our aching selves.

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Yes, we can feel mighty vulnerable. But one thing that helps me is remembering that God is not on vacation at this time. The same support and protection that we enjoy from the Lord during the year is present as we dare venture a bit farther out of our insulated world. Moreover, God knows what our frailties are, and somehow never fails in bringing angels into our world just when we need them. These are also many times strangers, but all times welcome. Holiday gifts. Manifestations of the Spirit of love.

So, even if you are a bit fearful of leaving your comfortable surroundings and mighty support system, know that God is with you always and everywhere. And with the protection that comes from our Lord, dare even more to enjoy this time and recognize the angels that you meet all along the way.

Peace,

Maureen

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