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Good Days…Bad Days With Maureen Pratt

Good Days…Bad Days With Maureen Pratt

Food for Thought: Song of the Sea

posted by mpratt
Image courtesy of worradmu/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of worradmu/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Oh, wow, what a wonderful movie is “Song of the Sea!” The story, animation,acting, and music all combine to make a beautiful and moving story lyrically laced with Irish folklore and touchingly told in a familiar familial way.

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I really enjoy animated movies, but I know many adults shy away from them, especially if they don’t have children to take “as an excuse.” But in recent years, the quality of animated movies has soared along with the storytelling, and as with “Song of the Sea,” adults as well as children will find it captivating and moving well beyond the ending credits.

There was a mother with her young son in the theater the day I saw the movie, which is full-length (about an hour twenty minutes). The boy, who I later learned was 3 years old, sat, transfixed, throughout the entire film! Nary a peep!

Afterward, the mother said that it was her son’s first movie, and he’d asked her if they could now watch it at home, too! What a great introduction to film – and what a testament to the movie itself that it could hold a toddler’s attention for more than an hour!

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If you like animated films, this one is a must. If you don’t, if you think that animated films are only for children, please reconsider. Give this one a try. let the music wash over you, and the adventure that unfolds be your adventure, too.

It never hurts to revisit the child within us. In fact, it can be that refreshing breath of air that rekindles a wonder, joy, and newness to all other aspects of our lives!

Blessings of joy and peace,

Maureen

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A Praying Spirit: We Are (Aware of) the World

posted by mpratt
Image courtesy of graur codrin/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of graur codrin/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Many chronic illnesses impose restrictions on our ability to move about freely in the world “at large.” Whether because of mobility issues, sight or hearing problems, or, as in my case, immunosuppressive drugs and their effect on the propensity to get sick, sometimes we just have to “stay put.”

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But, that doesn’t mean we’re not aware, nor does it mean that we should crawl into our proverbial hole and not care about the world outside.

I like to use my “inside” time to learn, reflect, and pray about things happening in distant places – even as distant as across the globe. I like to pray for people I don’t know, remembering them as “those who are suffering” or “those who are oppressed.” It doesn’t matter if I’ve never met them. I pray for them anyway. I also pray especially for others like myself who cannot venture out and who instead are hampered by physical or emotional constraints. How I understand! How I pray!

Praying for others, especially if I’m feeling left out of the enjoyable things outside my door, helps me shift the focus off of myself and what I cannot do to others who need more attention and intercession.

In prayer, we talk with God. In praying for others, we are carrying out an active, vibrant ministry, a calling, that transcends any health challenges that keep us from leaving our home base.

How amazing is that!

Joy and peace,

Maureen

 

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Chronic Pain: The Void in Your Life

posted by mpratt

Maureen Pratt Author PicSometimes, pain becomes so overwhelming that it closes out every ounce of strength and light that we might once have felt. And, into their place, there is a void. A void of light. A void of will. A void of hope. The pain can suffocate and keep us down. Yes, it can prevent us from physically moving freely. But more importantly, it can keep our minds and spirits from moving ahead and away. It can keep us from keeping our void stocked with things to help us cling to the very hope and will and light that the pain is driving away.

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I’ve known this kind of pain more than once, and understand how devastating it can be. I’ve even felt it try to tug me deeper, but, praise God, I was able to resist enough to refuse its encroachment further. It was a hard-fought battle, but in the little victory when “I resist” became true steadfastness, little by little, the power of the pain receded, and the voids it created could once again be freshly filled.

My resistance took several forms. First, heartfelt declaration, a loud, “No! I will not give in another inch.” Then, a conscious turning from anger at the pain to solace for my body and spirit, understanding the suffering and inviting God’s comfort. Of course, I worked with my doctors during this time, something that is vital where a medical condition is concerned. But I also turned to friends, loved ones, and accepted their encouragement and help. Sometimes, we think we’re absolutely alone. But we never really are.

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Turning to a beloved activity, even for a brief moment, can bring some hope. Reflecting on a favorite piece of music or book, Scripture passage or comic, can also help turn focus from what hurts to what helps.

We can allow the voids in our lives to be filled with darkness or light, frustration or fight. It is a beautiful thing, this choice we have! And I try to make positive use out of it each day,

Joy and peace,

Maureen

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Chronic Illness: A Disability Doesn’t Equal Immaturity

posted by mpratt

Maureen Pratt Author PicI was on a call the other day, trying to make sense of error messages spewed forth by my computer (I eventually learned that the hard drive had died…another story entirely!). The connection was really, really bad and the person in customer service was speaking very quickly and slurring words on top of it. So, I asked her to please slow down and indicated it was hard to hear what she was saying because of the bad connection.

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I’d already told her that I had a disability that made it difficult for me to lug my computer down to the “nearest” authorized dealer…

So, in response to my plea for slower and clearer speech, she began to “sing-song” her words and dumb down her language. As if I was hard of brain, as well as hard of hearing!

I immediately clarified.

“I might have a disability, but it doesn’t mean I’m feeble-minded. The problem is that the connection is bad and you’re speaking too quickly. Why don’t we hang up and start all over?”

She agreed to call  me back, did so, and we had a much clearer and more appropriate conversation.

You might have experienced this phenomenon, too. Whether your disability is visible or not, once you put it out there, some people might think it’s affecting your brain as well as your body. Which, well, there is lupus brain fog, and there are moments of exasperation…but…these are not permanent conditions and no reason to treat someone as if they were a child in an adult’s body.

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Always leaping forward into that “teachable moment,” I usually try to point these kinds of things out, as I did on this particular service call. Nicely, as much as possible, but clearly. It can be frustrating and energy-sapping to do so, but we’re all better off in the long run.

If you are not disabled, but come across someone who is, please check yourself if you find yourself speaking as to a child or a pet. And if you are disabled and are on the receiving end of said, well-meaning person’s speech, take a deep breath and then let the person know you’re perfectly able to handle whatever situation as an adult. I’m right there with you!

Blessings for the day,

Maureen

Previous Posts

Chronic Illness and Pain: Sisters, Please Read This!
f you have just been diagnosed with a serious chronic illness, or if you have been living with one for a long time, I just want to take time out to just say something, sister-to-sister:  Please do not be angry with yourself if you find that you ...

posted 8:32:25pm Aug. 27, 2015 | read full post »

Chronic Illness: Do You Wonder? And, Why It Matters
The clouds in the sky. A flash of lightning. A baby's giggle. A "common" cold. When you see or hear these things, do you disect them scientifically? Or, do you wonder? What are the things in your life that you try to analyze? What are ...

posted 7:23:11pm Aug. 25, 2015 | read full post »

Chronic Pain: Feeling the Heat?
Searing. Exhausting. Oppressive. These and other words are often used to describe the high heat of the summertime. ...

posted 7:06:47pm Aug. 24, 2015 | read full post »

Chronic Illness: The Choices We Make
It might not seem as if we have many choices when our priority is to stave off flares, infections, and other consequences of ...

posted 6:51:15pm Aug. 22, 2015 | read full post »

Chronic Pain: While We Are Sleeping
When our pain is severe, it can be difficult to sleep. Even if we're able to doze, we often awaken with pain, and ...

posted 6:38:56pm Aug. 20, 2015 | read full post »

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