God's Politics

God's Politics


A World of Hope (by Jim Wallis)

posted by gp_editor

Last week I had the great blessing of participating in World Vision’s Triennial Council held in Singapore. It drew together almost 500 people—World Vision’s country directors and many staff, board chairs, and members from every region of the world, as well as the international board of directors who will guide and govern what has become the largest relief and development organization in the world. World Vision has grown enormously, especially in the last several years, and is seeking to determine its future direction. The organization serves 100 million people in almost 100 countries, with 23,000 staff members and an annual budget of $2 billion. It was indeed a privilege to deliver the opening and closing addresses and to have many opportunities to interact with this extraordinary and significant group of people each day of the conference.
I saw an organization in the dynamic process of moving from alleviation to transformation. I felt the passion of an international community of humanitarian faith-based workers who care deeply about the poorest children of the world, and who clearly yearn to embrace a God of justice, not merely a God of charity. That was the call they responded to in Singapore. The response was especially powerful from those from the global South, where the churches are growing dramatically and the conditions of life for so many have forced the people of God to address the issues of global justice.
The response of World Vision to the Asian tsunami was especially impressive, along with so many other places where natural disasters and human conflicts have caused so much suffering over the last three years. But we talked about how the greatest “disaster” in the world today is the very structure of the global order itself, and how disasters such as the Asian tsunami and Hurricane Katrina only serve to reveal these underlying injustices. If we are to be faithful to the biblical vision, we must judge those global structures to be unjust.
Organizations such as World Vision have the choice of merely being the beneficiaries of the guilt of the developed world in serving the victims of an unjust global order, or they can serve the poor in a way that shines a spotlight on global injustice and the moral imperative for transformation. It is more and more clear that World Vision desires to make the second choice. Many from the global South told me they had never heard an American speak this way, but the Americans at Singapore were also clearly in sync with the need for World Vision’s prophetic vocation.
We must be Christians first, the World Vision delegates strongly affirmed, and citizens of nations and members of tribes second. Today, globalization seems to have an inevitable logic, but no comparable ethic. But international bodies such as World Vision, which know no geopolitical boundaries, could help create the ethics and values that globalization now lacks.
World Vision now has three organizational pillars: relief, development, and advocacy. Advocacy is the newest and most controversial pillar, but the imperative to deal with the root causes of human suffering, with the injustice that leads to disaster for so many, and with the policies of nations and international organizations that obstruct real solutions to poverty, has developed a real momentum within the organization. And rather than just becoming another lobby group, their deepest response was to the vocation of “changing the wind” of international politics and priorities.
“World Vision changed this week,” many people said to me as I departed. We could all feel it. It seemed that what has been growing within the organization for some time took a great leap forward during those days in Singapore, and there is no turning back. World Vision will not just be a collector of a guilty, affluent world’s donations to sponsor poor children, but rather a catalyst to help build a global movement for spiritual and social transformation. World Vision’s size, influence, and credibility positions the organization very well to be a prophetic leader in that movement for justice on the global stage that speaks truth to power—not just as a service provider when disaster strikes.
On the last day we spoke about a biblical theology of hope in a world of pain, and how hope, backed by faith, was the key to bringing about the global sea changes we desperately need. The choice today is less between belief and secularism, but between hope and cynicism. The theme of the final day was “A World of Hope,” and what I saw and felt at World Vision’s Singapore Triennial Council made me very hopeful indeed.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(48)
post a comment
Mick Sheldon

posted September 5, 2007 at 12:21 pm


Organizations such as World Vision have the choice of merely being the beneficiaries of the guilt of the developed world in serving the victims of an unjust global order, or they can serve the poor in a way that shines a spotlight on global injustice and the moral imperative for transformation
===========================================
Can someone clearify what this means ? Is he saying people give because of guilt to world vision , and how do we provide “justice” for poor countries ? Do we take wealth from say At&T and just give it to Mexico ? This is hard to understand .



report abuse
 

jesse

posted September 5, 2007 at 12:29 pm


“If we are to be faithful to the biblical vision, we must judge those global structures to be unjust.”
–Is every suffering considered “unjust”? Justice is a word thrown around so liberally here. What does it mean?
I also hope and pray that World Vision does not become a advocacy group for socialist economic reforms (I do not think they are doing this right now). If they do this, they will have truly parted from their mission and lost my support.



report abuse
 

chase

posted September 5, 2007 at 1:20 pm


I was in Singapore for the World Vision conference, and I think the key buzzword was “speaking the truth.” It was less about propagating a specific agenda, and more about speaking up where things are not right in the world. For example, nearly 11 million children die every year from preventable causes–mostly things like malaria and diarrhea that comes from unsafe drinking water. This is not right, but it is not in the media and it is not on the political agenda. WV has a responsibility to “speak the truth” about this, even as it continues to focus on transformational development at the community level, working for clean water and bed nets etc.



report abuse
 

jerry

posted September 5, 2007 at 1:28 pm


what is jim saying? what happened to Jesus’ mandate? the great commission? world vision is great, always has been but what is jim saying. what is he gonna DO? w v ….”could help create the ethics and values that globalization now lacks”. why not just put heat on the criminals that are creating all the chaos, starvation, and killing? advocate eliminating evil people. name names, point fingers. DO SOMETHING.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted September 5, 2007 at 1:39 pm


I think World Vision is getting involved with issues such as sex trafficking and conflict diamonds. Speaking of the tsunami and justice, I would like to see World Vision and others speak out about oppressed Indonesian Buddhists and Christians who are regarded as second class citizens by Muslim authorities, and have been cheated out of much of the aid that has flooded into that area.



report abuse
 

Moderatelad

posted September 5, 2007 at 2:47 pm


Posted by: kevin s. | September 5, 2007 1:39 PM
‘…World Vision and others speak out about oppressed Indonesian Buddhists and Christians who are regarded as second class citizens by Muslim authorities…’
Great question – I would like an answer to that one from WV or SOJO.
Blondies anytime soon?
Moderatelad -
.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted September 5, 2007 at 5:12 pm


Jesse,
“why not just put heat on the criminals that are creating all the chaos, starvation, and killing? advocate eliminating evil people. name names, point fingers. DO SOMETHING.”
I’m not sure what you are saying. I would think they are already DOING something. I also would think “shining a spotlight” on injustice probably includes the above. Could you clarify your concerns?



report abuse
 

squeaky

posted September 5, 2007 at 5:15 pm


“I would like to see World Vision and others speak out about oppressed Indonesian Buddhists and Christians who are regarded as second class citizens by Muslim authorities, and have been cheated out of much of the aid that has flooded into that area. ”
Do you know for sure they aren’t? And even if they aren’t, are you?
(above post is mine, too)



report abuse
 

Bill Samuel

posted September 5, 2007 at 8:11 pm


There may be a perspective that they changed in Singapore, but they have been in the process of changing for some time now. So it’s probably a deepening of the change taking root with their conference.
I see the direction World Vision has been moving as part of a much larger movement within the evangelical church which is very hopeful. What has been happening is a fuller and more wholistic understanding of the Gospel message, and a deepening commitment to living it out. Praise God!



report abuse
 

Jane

posted September 5, 2007 at 9:05 pm


Jesus did not accept the status quo, He came to change the world, to stand up for the poor and marginalised and to remind us in person what the kingdom of God is all about. That’s what World Vision and other organisations like it must do – stand up for the poor, speak for them in places where they do to have a voice and mobilse others to do likewise. A movement of people who can change the world!



report abuse
 

jesse

posted September 5, 2007 at 9:35 pm


squeaky,
those comments were from Jerry, not me.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 5, 2007 at 9:56 pm


I would like to see World Vision and others speak out about oppressed Indonesian Buddhists and Christians who are regarded as second class citizens by Muslim authorities, and have been cheated out of much of the aid that has flooded into that area.
You seem to be doing just fine yourself in that area. Besides, complaining about Christian persecution from these shores smacks of moral arrogance for the simple reason that the “oppressed” over there generally don’t complain — because they know that persecution is one of the hazards of following Christ. Better that they complain about persecution of all kinds everywhere — even here, if need be.



report abuse
 

Jerseykid

posted September 5, 2007 at 10:19 pm


“complaining about Christian persecution from these shores smacks of moral arrogance”
Which is consistent with the tenor of his other posts, I might add.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted September 5, 2007 at 11:31 pm


“You seem to be doing just fine yourself in that area.”
Glad of it.
“Besides, complaining about Christian persecution from these shores smacks of moral arrogance for the simple reason that the “oppressed” over there generally don’t complain”
I was referring to religious minorities in general. You might note that I mentioned Buddhists and Christians. The One of my friends from church has Buddhist relatives over there who waited in lines for food and drink that was stolen from them. I’m pretty sure they complained. How or why it is arrogance to bring that up is beyond me.
How is it arrogant for me to complain on behalf of the voiceless? That is completely ridiculous.
“Better that they complain about persecution of all kinds everywhere — even here, if need be”
But that would be arrogant. Right?



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted September 5, 2007 at 11:46 pm


“Blondies anytime soon?”
Next Tuesday @ 5?



report abuse
 

Donny

posted September 6, 2007 at 12:52 am


Wallis’ writings sound good until you research what “Sojouners” are. A bunch of Secular Progressives masquerading as something they are not.



report abuse
 

Don

posted September 6, 2007 at 1:40 am


I think it’s naive to believe the proliferation of evil (injustice) is the result of a lack of information. Not that I’m against more information being disseminated. Truth is the overwhelming majority of Christians find it as easy to ignore this information as they do to ignore Jesus’ commands/teachings.



report abuse
 

Don

posted September 6, 2007 at 8:00 am


Hmmmm, another Don is posting here, or else someone is using my handle. This 1:40 AM post was not mine.
Peace,



report abuse
 

squeaky

posted September 6, 2007 at 9:03 am


Sorry Jesse–I thought I wrote Jerry, but clearly I failed in that attempt.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted September 6, 2007 at 9:28 am


Posted by: kevin s. | September 5, 2007 11:46 PM
Next Tuesday @ 5?
Looks like it will work for me. I might be 5 – 10 mins late.
Have a great day
Moderatelad -
.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 6, 2007 at 10:10 am


The One of my friends from church has Buddhist relatives over there who waited in lines for food and drink that was stolen from them. I’m pretty sure they complained. How or why it is arrogance to bring that up is beyond me.
Did you complain when Muslims here were looked upon suspiciously after 9/11? I know for a fact that they were — I interviewed several a couple of weeks later for a three stories.
But, ultimately, that’s beside the point. We Christians have to examine ourselves to make sure we’re on the right path regardless of the rest of the “world,” which is what I see World Vision doing. Once we have ourselves reasonably adjusted we can speak prophetically to the world around us. Cultural “authority” should never be the Christian’s concern (though we may get it by accident).



report abuse
 

Moderatelad

posted September 6, 2007 at 10:47 am


The One of my friends from church has Buddhist relatives over there who waited in lines for food and drink that was stolen from them. I’m pretty sure they complained. How or why it is arrogance to bring that up is beyond me.
This happens more often than we think or more often tham some want to admit. I have a friend that goes over to the mideast 2 to 3 times a year to encourage the Christians in that area. They are made up of all the various ethnic groups in that region, but just because they are ‘Christians’ makes them free game for harassment. I know, I know, there were some people that after 9-11 were very suspect of Muslims in the US, that is to be expected. I 99 times out of 100 it was 100% wrong. I did hear of times where the Islamic person told their neighbors that we (the US) got what we deserved. I and others did approach Islamic neighbors in our community to offer our support should anyone threaten them or their family in any way. (of course that did not get any press in MN) I believe that Christians in general do good things for the communities we live in and we do things good. Room for improvement – always.
Blessings -
.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted September 6, 2007 at 12:07 pm


“Did you complain when Muslims here were looked upon suspiciously after 9/11?”
Yes.
“But, ultimately, that’s beside the point.”
Completely and utterly, yes.
“We Christians have to examine ourselves to make sure we’re on the right path regardless of the rest of the “world,” which is what I see World Vision doing.”
That is fine. Wallis said that they are getting more involved with advocacy. I hope one of their advocacy efforts centers around this particular instance of opression.
It is interesting that such an innocuous proposal got such a strong response. I don’t know if it’s a knee-jerk defense of all things Muslim or what.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 6, 2007 at 3:07 pm


I hope one of their advocacy efforts centers around this particular instance of opression.
I hope not, for reasons I mention below.
It is interesting that such an innocuous proposal got such a strong response. I don’t know if it’s a knee-jerk defense of all things Muslim or what.
Unless you’re already thinking that way, there’s no way what we said could have been interpreted as such. I, for one, reject Islam out of hand, not so because it is a “false religion” but because it rejects the supremacy of Christ. That said, one of Christianity’s biggest historical problems is the desire of conservatives for cultural supremacy, as I mentioned above, in effect replacing Christ, which is why Middle Eastern Muslims feel they need to do the same thing — in essence, the Islamist radicals you fear so much are only copying us.



report abuse
 

tabitha

posted September 7, 2007 at 8:41 am


How ridiculous…. Middle Eastern Muslims are copying conservative Christians. I assume you know something about Islam, but this comment betrays you. From the time of Muhammed to now, Muslims faithful to the tenets of their faith have been trying to dominate the world, and this was not because Christians dominated Muhammed, but because they and others religous traditions questioned the nature of his ‘divine revelations’ and did not bow down to his heresay. Islam has and always will be about domination…if you don’t believe like they do, their beliefs allow them to declare you an infidel and allow you to be murdered.
One of the recent fundraising emails I got from World Vision was encouraging me to pretend I was a transgender in order to attract attention to myself so others would give me money for Worl Vision.
I’ve worked in 50 nations for the poor, and in most places World Vision is nothing more than a social work. Few would know they are supposedly Christians, especially the Muslims working for them.



report abuse
 

R. Wright

posted September 7, 2007 at 10:30 am


How amazing is it that World Vision would even invite Jim Wallis to deliever the opening and closing addresses? And how amazing is it to see them add advocacy to their triad of emphases? I’ll have to revisit the organization and support its “transformation.”



report abuse
 

jsens

posted September 7, 2007 at 11:39 am


Sounds like World Vision has the perceived global justice problem under control! I’ll bet they have that mess in Darfur cleaned up by Christmas. By next spring they’ll probably have Robert Mugabe converted and Zimbabwe on the road to being a great agricultural producing nation again so its population can avoid its 10,000% + inflation and outright starvation. We can feel free to move on to other important matters knowing how much good World Vision will be doing.
By the way, what do the uniforms of World Vision troops look like?



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 7, 2007 at 11:48 am


How ridiculous … Middle Eastern Muslims are copying conservative Christians. I assume you know something about Islam, but this comment betrays you. From the time of Muhammad to now, Muslims faithful to the tenets of their faith have been trying to dominate the world …
And how is that different from conservative Christians, especially in America and especially during the 1980s? I personally have had the misfortune of being mistreated by other Christians for challenging conservative orthodoxy, much of which has absolutely nothing to do with the Gospel. Besides, Muslims in that part of the world have for centuries felt really put upon by the West — I’m not defending their attitudes but I understand them.



report abuse
 

Sean

posted September 7, 2007 at 10:19 pm


Organizations such as World Vision have the choice of merely being the beneficiaries of the guilt of the developed world in serving the victims of an unjust global order, or they can serve the poor in a way that shines a spotlight on global injustice and the moral imperative for transformation
–Wallis
===========================================
Can someone clearify what this means ? Is he saying people give because of guilt to world vision , and how do we provide “justice” for poor countries ? Do we take wealth from say At&T and just give it to Mexico ? This is hard to understand .
–Sheldon
And how is that different from conservative Christians, especially in America and especially during the 1980s? I personally have had the misfortune of being mistreated by other Christians for challenging conservative orthodoxy, much of which has absolutely nothing to do with the Gospel. Besides, Muslims in that part of the world have for centuries felt really put upon by the West — I’m not defending their attitudes but I understand them.
–Nowlin
“why not just put heat on the criminals that are creating all the chaos, starvation, and killing? advocate eliminating evil people. name names, point fingers. DO SOMETHING.”
–anonymous
Mr. Sheldon, you are entirely right to ask this question. To me also, Wallis’ statements seem to somehow defy any reality or logic that is familiar to me. But this is a new logic. It is a logic of the blind eye, the partial truth and even the lie.
To answer Mr. Sheldon’s question, Wallis isn’t going to get specific, and he certainly isn’t going to give you a straight answer here. THEY post, and we peons chatter in their forum–at least they don’t censor.
But incomplete answers are the vehicle for lies, and lies are the vehicle for evil. It is no accident that in those countries wherein live the poorest people of the world, there are also lacking many freedoms and opportunities that the truth begets. Even the poorest nations of the past–Bangladesh–can make comebacks, while despots in other nations–Haiti and North Korea suffer perhaps worse than poverty, they suffer a privation of truth. After all, it is not an injustice simply that someone does not share with them. People are willing to, but the Dominican Republic and South Korea are willing recipients of the truth; they are also willing recipients of friendly aids and trade.
What Wallis is saying seems to be 1) WV can be the recipients of money from Westerners who feel guilty for their disparity of wealth against the rest of the world, and 2) WV has the opportunity to spread the guilt and make many more people feel this way. In other words, they can collect money, and they can put on their scolding faces and collect more money. It’s a startling admission–as if he is thinking out loud, perhaps to catch himself in admitting to the collaboration with 500 other WVers to manipulate people and their feelings.
I look at things this way. Charity is personal; it always was with Christ, and it has to be that way. He sacrificed face-to-face, and He encouraged others to do the same. In all of Christ’s preaching and works, he did put his wealthy audiences in guilt trips. He bravely admonished them, cajoled them and warned them about their own salvation, but Christ did not take advantage of other people’s unhealthy feelings the way that Wallis admits. Rather, he comforted the poor.
There is no truth in just feelings. Faith is part feelings, but faith also contains at least a large part truth, trust and a fair measure of discipline. Feelings are also an unreliable source for motivation. That is why we need faith, and that is why we spend our lives developing it.
Giving money to some anonymous (I’ve never heard of WV) organization strikes me as a panacea for our feelings at best and an abdication of responsibility at worst. Don’t we have a responsibility to know and interact with those we help? I think Christ would say so, and that is after all, also a courageous answer.
Sojourners, like WV, decries “social injustice”. But asking someone to “do something” abdicates the responsibility we all have. A journalist once derided Mother Teresa for not changing “the system”–the same system I presume Wallis wants to change. This may strike you weird Mr. Sheldon as it did me, when I first heard it, but in the journalists criticism we hear that echo of the same question, “why can’t someone just DO SOMETHING”??? It’s great that you’re doing something you stupid nun, but why aren’t you solving the problem? Mother Teresa calmly answered, “this is simply what God wants me to do.
I think you’ll find that “changing the system” is often a projection of our own lives onto society, rather than our correct interpretation of God’s will. We can take our resentments and our psychoses and our sin, bury them and let them fester while we turn our attentions outward to problems we envision ourselves solving heroically.
Problem is that no one’s ever been heroic doing this–except Christ himself. And Christ, unlike modern appeasers, wasn’t afraid to look evil in the eye and say, “get out you Satan!” I wonder if Nowlin understands radical Islam say, in the persons of Achmedinijad, bin Laden or Zarkowi as we all understand Hitler or Pol Pot. When you get specific and look face to face, issues, morality and love become clearer than the vagueries of “the system.”
You are right to be suspicious of such pap.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 7, 2007 at 11:38 pm


I look at things this way. Charity is personal; it always was with Christ, and it has to be that way. He sacrificed face-to-face, and He encouraged others to do the same. In all of Christ’s preaching and works, he did put his wealthy audiences in guilt trips. He bravely admonished them, cajoled them and warned them about their own salvation, but Christ did not take advantage of other people’s unhealthy feelings the way that Wallis admits. Rather, he comforted the poor.
I ask then, have you ever read the Prophets, such as Isaiah, Micah or Amos? The issue, as they say so clearly, isn’t so much charity but justice. You see, if we worked to make things right for the poor they might not be poor anymore. (When Jesus said “The poor will always be with you,” He was saying only that “you can help them anytime you want but you won’t always have Me.”) That said, simply giving money to charity can indeed help to avoid the real issue, which may be systemic. My church does both, encouraging the poor to take control of their own lives and challenging the “system” so that they have the means to do so.
Besides, while Christ does save individually He saves us into a Body; those in the more collective-oriented Middle East understand this better than we in the West. Thus, we as a community must be challenged to “do justice, love mercy and walk humbly with [our] God” (Micah 6:8).



report abuse
 

Lauren Todd

posted September 7, 2007 at 11:43 pm


I think you’ll find that “changing the system” is often a projection of our own lives onto society, rather than our correct interpretation of God’s will. We can take our resentments and our psychoses and our sin, bury them and let them fester while we turn our attentions outward to problems we envision ourselves solving heroically.
I know I am new here but I want to point out that “humility” is the door to God’s will, and “forgiveness” is the key that opens it, and experience leads you to the door, Jim Wallis has had very little experience on a personal level with being poor, so he cannot know how soul wrenching poverty really is; (so give him a break.) Anyone who has had to struggle with poverty knows what is really like, and unity with Jesus keeps us from a false sense of humility that are deeds are heroic and keeps us heading toward God’s will and plan for our lives; however,the point you made is a red light, it is something that all of us ought to watch out for. Thanks for making a statement that makes us all think a little more.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 8, 2007 at 8:21 am


Jim Wallis has had very little experience on a personal level with being poor, so he cannot know how soul wrenching poverty really is…
Well, he does live in one of the worst neighborhoods in D.C. and has done so for years, so he sees it all the time. I would trust his judgments over that of, say, Marvin Olasky any day.



report abuse
 

Moderatelad

posted September 8, 2007 at 3:39 pm


Posted by: Lauren Todd | September 7, 2007 11:43 PM
Jim Wallis has had very little experience on a personal level with being poor, so he cannot know how soul wrenching poverty…’
A lot of people that talk about the poor have little direct understanding. But all you have to do as a liberal is say that you ‘know and care’ then all is right in Liberville.
I have to find if Wallis’ speaches are on the net somewhere – I am sure they are interesting listening. (or maybe they could cure someone insomnia – tee hee)
Blessings -
.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 8, 2007 at 5:59 pm


A lot of people that talk about the poor have little direct understanding.
Helps if you’ve been there.



report abuse
 

Moderatelad

posted September 8, 2007 at 9:43 pm


Posted by: Rick Nowlin | September 8, 2007 5:59 PM
was someone saying something?
.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 8, 2007 at 11:45 pm


Moderatelad — You tell me.



report abuse
 

Moderatelad

posted September 9, 2007 at 8:37 am


Sorry – thought I heard something – I must have been mistaken and I don’t want to argue.
Blessings -
.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 9, 2007 at 8:19 pm


Moderatelad — If you don’t want to argue, then leave this blog. Immediately and permanantly.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted September 10, 2007 at 12:11 am


Posted by: Rick Nowlin | September 9, 2007 8:19 PM
No comment – no argument.
There are others that are respectful in their comments – even when they think I am wrong. Meeting on of them for a beer on Tuesday.
But your free to go.
Tootles
.



report abuse
 

Moderatelad

posted September 10, 2007 at 12:12 am


Posted by: | September 10, 2007 12:11 AM
For anyone that might be interested – this one was mine.
Please stop.
.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 10, 2007 at 11:05 am


There are others that are respectful in their comments – even when they think I am wrong. Meeting on of them for a beer on Tuesday.
That was never the issue. You came on this blog and said stuff that, by any standard, was just plain false; thus, that automatically invalidated your opinion on that issue and you hurt the church in the process.



report abuse
 

Moderatelad

posted September 10, 2007 at 11:22 am


Posted by: Rick Nowlin | September 10, 2007 11:05 AM
One Last Time -
Your opinion not mine.
According to you – my prayer are wasted and I’m an Idolitor.
Not much else to say – I have never accused anyone of that nor would I.
Please – make me a memory – there are others that you can talk to on this site. By the way – I am not leaving and not saying that you should either.
The End -
.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 10, 2007 at 12:16 pm


I am not leaving and not saying that you should either.
Then, for God’s sake, LEARN THE TRUTH!!!!! And for that matter, don’t get all huffy when someone else does!



report abuse
 

Moderatelad

posted September 10, 2007 at 12:39 pm


Posted by: Rick Nowlin | September 10, 2007 12:16 PM
And for that matter, don’t get all huffy when someone else does!
Not huffy – just respect. I believe that my prayers are just as valid as yours and would never call you or anyone an idolator.
Bye -
.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 10, 2007 at 3:40 pm


I believe that my prayers are just as valid as yours and would never call you or anyone an idolator.
When you pray things that God said in His Word that He will not answer and place your personal agenda above it and His Kingdom, … well, I don’t know what else to call it. Believe me, understanding that truth has changed prayer life.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted September 10, 2007 at 3:44 pm


A glitch in the system — that last phrase should read: “…. understanding that truth has changed my prayer life.”



report abuse
 

anon

posted September 16, 2007 at 11:57 pm


Ironic, you are having an extremely petty online argument on a blog about World Vision.
Looks like this is a case of do as we say, not as we do.



report abuse
 

Pingback: Don’t Be an Alibi for Social Justice (by Jim Wallis) - God's Politics

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting God's Politics. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:14:07am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Why I Work for Immigration Reform (by Patty Kupfer)
When I tell people that I work on immigration reform, they usually laugh or say, "way to pick an easy topic." Everyday it feels like there is more fear, more hate. Raids are picking up in Nevada, California, and New York. A number of senators who supported comprehensive reform only a few months ago

posted 12:30:52pm Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Audio: Jim Wallis on "Value Voters" on The Tavis Smiley Show
Last week Jim was on The Tavis Smiley Show and talked about how the changing political landscape will affect the upcoming '08 election. Jim and Ken Blackwell, former Ohio secretary of state, debated and discussed both the impact of "value voters" on the election and what those values entail. + Down

posted 10:11:56am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Verse of the Day: 'peace to the far and the near'
I have seen their ways, but I will heal them; I will lead them and repay them with comfort, creating for their mourners the fruit of the lips. Peace, peace, to the far and the near, says the Lord; and I will heal them. But the wicked are like the tossing sea that cannot keep still; its waters toss u

posted 9:35:01am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Daily News Digest (by Duane Shank)
the latest news on Mideast, Iran, Romney-Religious right, Blog action day, Turkey, SCHIP, Iran, Aids-Africa, India, Budget, Brownback-slavery apology, Canada, and selected op-eds. Sign up to receive our daily news summary via e-mail » Blog action day. Thousands of bloggers unite in blitz of green

posted 9:31:25am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.