God's Politics

God's Politics


Back to School Reading List /by Jim Wallis/

posted by God's Politics

Many students will groan when I point out these inevitable signs of the times, and an equally inevitable conclusion. August is upon us. Summer is quickly winding down. And this can only mean one thing: school is just around the corner!
I was reminded of this fact yesterday as I sent off my book order for the course I’m teaching at Harvard Divinity School this fall. If you’re looking for some late-summer reading, consider the following titles:
H. Richard Niebuhr, Christ and Culture
John Howard Yoder, The Politics of Jesus
E.J. Dionne Jr., One Electorate Under God?
Susannah Heschel (ed), Moral Grandeur and Spiritual Audacity: Essays
Richard Land, The Divided States of America? What Liberals AND Conservatives are missing in the God-and-country shouting match!
Reza Aslan, No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Failing America’s Faithful: How Today’s Churches Are Mixing God with Politics and Losing Their Way
Donald Dayton, Discovering an Evangelical Heritage
Randall Balmer, Thy Kingdom Come: How the Religious Right Distorts the Faith and Threatens America
David Kuo, Tempting Faith: An Inside Story of Political Seduction
Michael Gerson, Heroic Conservatism: Why Republicans Need to Embrace America’s Ideals (And Why They Deserve to Fail If They Don’t)
Ronald Thiemann, Religion in Public Life: A Dilemma For Democracy
Michael Kazin, A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings Bryan



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canucklehead

posted August 29, 2007 at 2:20 pm


what, Jim, no LEFT BEHIND, part 63: the Anti-christ moves to Mayberry?



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Dorothy Adams

posted August 29, 2007 at 2:33 pm


In this world and times that God has caused us to live today, I wonder where to stand on so many issues of faith, ideas, and strategies to reach the lost all around me, I am tempted to voice an opinion on many things that may go against the grain of certain people’s politics, and ideology. I want to be “open” to those who God has commanded me to minister to. However I am conflicted…how do we as Christians remain open and welcoming, while at the same time standing up for something righteous, something holy…a Holy God? I want sometimes put a ban on talking about anything political in church. I get so tired of hearing the same old things, about our country being founded on “christian values”, and why the deaths of so many people each day, who belong at home with their families, and those who just happen to live in a country we are trying to “rebuild”, when I feel we are there based on lies. As I sit on the pew in a million dollar facility, where we just completed a 40 thousand dollar parking lot project, next to 3 other churches, the selfishness, and aloofness to what’s happening outside, makes me so sad. I wonder if it makes Jesus sad too? Policy that promotes justice, is admirable too, to be sure. As long as it has feet that move to bring good news, and hands ready for action in the Lord. I commend you (sojourner mag) for speaking to these issues, but I emplore you, stay true to Jesus, and His message.



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Bill Kessenich

posted August 29, 2007 at 3:35 pm


Jim’s first recommended reading Christ and Culture by Reinhold Niebuhr is a transformational book that identifies the multiple facets of the Jesus we know through reading the Gospels. When I read it back in college, I was struck by how each generation in history has tried to ask the age-old Biblical question: “Who do you say that I am?” None of us who identify ourselves as Christians can ignore this radical question. It is the very different answers that we find from wrestling with this question that leads to the multiplicity of religions that call themselves Christian. I say “viva la differance” – the Jesus I know and love and follow not to well sometimes is that rich that many expressions cannot exhaust his reality. So whether you are fundamentalist, far right Christian, or the most liberal member of your mainline Church, each of us answers that question throught the way we live primarily, not just by what we say. It seems fundamental to me that we must love and embrace everyone in our world as neighbor in the style of Jesus Himself. What can we learn from each other about what it means to live in Christ – that is the burning question of our divided age!!!



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jk

posted August 29, 2007 at 4:12 pm


Dorothy, it sounds like you and I go to the same church…



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Rick Nowlin

posted August 29, 2007 at 4:56 pm


I want to be “open” to those who God has commanded me to minister to. However I am conflicted…how do we as Christians remain open and welcoming, while at the same time standing up for something righteous, something holy…a Holy God?
By deliberately being counter-cultural. The faith He intended was by design supposed to go “against the grain,” but American evangelical Christianity, because of its relative affluence, comfort and cultural authority, has pretty much lost that. In fact, while I appreciate my own tradition (Reformed) on a theological level, it otherwise tends to frown on anything that does not fit its “system.” In some cases it’s still fighting the Reformation!
I wish you could attend my church, which avoids direct political involvement but which speaks up for God’s justice and has taken issues of reconciliation head-on. Despite some minor theological “issues,” I’ve never been so well-equipped spiritually.



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Wolverine

posted August 29, 2007 at 8:37 pm


What, no Russell Kirk, or Leo Strauss?
For shame, for shame!
Wolverine



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Rick Nowlin

posted August 29, 2007 at 8:45 pm


What, no Russell Kirk, or Leo Strauss?
Do they come from a religious background or orientation?



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Amazon Creek

posted August 30, 2007 at 12:47 am


Wow…good, thought provoking discussion tonight…
Those look like some interesting books. Will have to see if I can get a hold of some of them at the downtown library. They do sound like they’d be somewhat expensive…and soooo….think the library route might be best.
Canucklehead..LOL! I did read the Left Behind thread. Was too busy catching up on emails at that point to post. But…it kind of amuses me that people get so worked up about a work of fiction. Can understand the concerns…but still….those are works of fiction. Certainly an author needs to be sensitive to the effect faulty actions of characters may have on non-discerning readers…but…fiction is “art”. And art is often hard to pin down what the author intended. Anyways….moving right along.



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Amazon Creek

posted August 30, 2007 at 1:19 am


Dorothy..
You and I sound like kindred spirits. I hear you, sister – wrestle with the same internal questions. How to be open and accepting…to the folks in my neighborhood and community – but still….be definite about what God says is true. Both are important.
Kind of like being “wise as a serpent” at the same time as being “innocent as a dove”? There’s another one! Scripture has lots of those kinds of dilemmas.
Think once again, it’s because the Greek word for sin is hamartia – an archery term – meaning to miss the bullseye of a target. You can go too far in ANY direction. Hitting God’s target demands balance in all directions, the right mix of many competing ingredients.
I like what you added, Rick. I’m not against political involvement. I’ve been very politically involved (even had an excellent campaign manager offer to run a campaign for me to run for office). But…darn…political involvement tends to gobble up more and more and more time! It’s like blackberry vines or a buddleia butterfly bush – delicious berries and lovely flowers that attract butterflies – but very invasive. They eat up more and more and more of your garden space. Crowd out OTHER worthy plants.
I got out of the organization I chaired because it demanded more time than I wanted to give.
If Jesus had been able to vote, I’m sure He would have voted the same way He lived – open, caring, giving. But that same Jesus never acted like this world was our home. His MAIN emphasis was sharing God’s forgiveness and power available for their lives to transform them from the inside out. And I seek to copy that.
And so…I’m willing to spend an hour a week on political involvement – but I draw the line there. The rest I want to be direct ministry with the salt-of-the-earth, grassroots. Not a bunch of big shots who rarely give you a straight answer.
Dorothy, I agree with you on that I would be unlikely to attend a fellowship where politics was constantly being preached. Again…it goes back to this world not being our home. Our politics should come as an overflow of what’s inside of us.
“Work OUT your salvation” (Philippians 2). Let it flow out to the surface.
“Having BEEN FILLED with the filled with the fruit of righteousness, which comes through Jesus Christ, to the glory and praise of God.” (Philippians 1)
And yes, I agree, churches in America tend to fight the same struggles we as individuals fight. We have so darned much money – and how do we use these gifts God gave us responsibly. Are we as individuals buying gadgets and spending money on things, and are our churches spending money on things – just because we “can”? Or are we using the funds God provided wisely, seeking His guidance in how to stretch our resources the furthest.
We individuals could do with a lot less. And a lot of churches could too. Temptation in having so much, huh?
Back to the question of how to communicate BOTH God’s love and God’s truth (“speaking the truth in love”?)…I’m wondering if perhaps the glue that can hold all that together is seeking to be open about OUR OWN STRUGGLES and FAILURES and seeking an attitude that “we’re all in this fight together”. We just struggle with different things.
This is difficult. Hard to find.



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Don

posted August 30, 2007 at 7:50 am


“I did read the Left Behind thread. Was too busy catching up on emails at that point to post. But…it kind of amuses me that people get so worked up about a work of fiction.”
Amazon, yes they are fiction, but they are also religious propaganda. Read my post on the original LB thread. And even though they are fiction, they raise serious hermeneutical issues that are worth discussing,
Maybe we should hope that nobody brings up The DaVinci Code here. ;-)



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kevin s.

posted August 30, 2007 at 8:04 am


You can be sure that the Ivy League Div-schools featured Da Vinci on many a reading list.



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carl copas

posted August 30, 2007 at 11:55 am


kevin s: “You can be sure that the Ivy League Div-schools featured Da Vinci on many a reading list.”
Many syllabi are now posted online. Would be easy enough to check. I’d be surprised to find any that assigned DaVinci Code, outside of courses on conspiracy theory and the like.
To my knowledge, none of my colleagues at my institution has done so.
However, I teach a course that covers recent U.S. history. In past years, I have assigned occasionally the first volume of “Left Behind” series as part of our look at the rise of the Christian Right in the late 20th century.



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Davy

posted August 30, 2007 at 12:38 pm


What a list of reading material! May I sussest you add “God in Public: Four Ways American Christianity and Public Life Relate” by Mark G. Toulouse.



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Moderatelad

posted August 30, 2007 at 2:11 pm


Little lite in the diversity area. Liberal thought is well represented but not much else.
Logical for Sojo – was expected.
Blessings -
.



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Reginald Perkins III

posted August 30, 2007 at 2:39 pm


Oh how I wish my cholesterol was lower. I have many a layer in bones of theological cholesterol. I wish it weren’t so but it is.
There are rememdies, but they are far off:
Karl Barth, Martin Luther, and Stanley Hauerwas to name a few. But hitherto, my ailment continues. Who will remove my theological cholesterol before something more comes my way?



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Wildebeast

posted August 30, 2007 at 2:57 pm


As I prepare to teach a course on The American Politics of Religion, I have found 2 books helpful:
“Onward Christian Soldiers” to be an interesting account of the nuts and bolts of how related conservative social movements get things done, as well as
“The Churching of America” and how institutions fight for marketshare and constantly battle between secularity and revivalism. Never thought of faith as a form of currancy before, but its portrayal of how conservative sects move out of secularizing churches as they increasingly accomodate the world sounds a great note in what Sojourners is hopefully about: an honest application of faith in a saving Christ that accepts the modern world, but on the Gospel’s terms.
It is not easy remaining an alien and stranger (dare I say Sojourner) without either becoming too comfortable or refusing to pay rent in my temporary home.



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Jon

posted August 30, 2007 at 3:43 pm


“August is upon us”? It’s already the 29th.



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carl copas

posted August 30, 2007 at 4:11 pm


Wildebeest,
You weren’t writing to me specifically but thanks for the titles “Onward Christian Soldiers” and “The Churching of America.”
With respect to other books that could be added to Jim’s list, Gregory A. Boyd and Paul Rhodes Eddy, “Lord or Legend?: Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma,” is excellent. It’s just now published and fits nicely with interpretations of N.T. Wright, Richard Baukham, James Dunn, and company.



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kevin s.

posted August 30, 2007 at 4:48 pm


“Many syllabi are now posted online. Would be easy enough to check. I’d be surprised to find any that assigned DaVinci Code, outside of courses on conspiracy theory and the like.
To my knowledge, none of my colleagues at my institution has done so.”
I have a friend at Berkeley who was assigned it, which isn’t an Ivy League school, but certainly boasts a similar clientele. At which school do you teach?



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peacemover

posted August 30, 2007 at 4:48 pm


A few additional books and authors to possibly add to the end-of-summer reading list:
-”The Secret Message of Jesus,” and “Everything Must Change,” by Brian McLaren
-any of Karen Armstrong, Marcus Borg or John Dominic Crossan’s excellent books on Christian spirituality and the “emerging way.”
-”In the Name of Heaven: 3000 Yrs of Religious Persecution,” by Mary Jane Engh
-”Sins of Scripture,” John Shelby Spong
-”Wherever You Go, There You Are,” Jon Kabat-Zinn
-”Process Theology,” by John Cobb, jr & David Ray Griffin
Those are some of the excellent books that I’ve been working on this summer… I have already read Niebuhr & Yoder (I like Yoder a lot better), as well as Reza Aslan & David Kuo’s books- Aslan’s is a GREAT contemporary perspective and brief history of Islam; Kuo’s book is a memoir on his disillusionment with the Bush administration’s empty promises with the so-called “Faith Based Initiatives,” that were never funded or adequately pursued. Peace, John



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peacemover

posted August 30, 2007 at 4:49 pm


A few additional books and authors to possibly add to the end-of-summer reading list:
-”The Secret Message of Jesus,” and “Everything Must Change,” by Brian McLaren
-any of Karen Armstrong, Marcus Borg or John Dominic Crossan’s excellent books on Christian spirituality and the “emerging way.”
-”In the Name of Heaven: 3000 Yrs of Religious Persecution,” by Mary Jane Engh
-”Sins of Scripture,” John Shelby Spong
-”Wherever You Go, There You Are,” Jon Kabat-Zinn
-”Process Theology,” by John Cobb, jr & David Ray Griffin
Those are some of the excellent books that I’ve been working on this summer… I have already read Niebuhr & Yoder (I like Yoder a lot better), as well as Reza Aslan & David Kuo’s books- Aslan’s is a GREAT contemporary perspective and brief history of Islam; Kuo’s book is a memoir on his disillusionment with the Bush administration’s empty promises with the so-called “Faith Based Initiatives,” that were never funded or adequately pursued.
Peace, John



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Jen

posted August 30, 2007 at 5:15 pm


I think the best use of “The DaVinci Code” in a classroom would not be for the historical questions and speculations it raises, but instead as a catalyst for discussing why this book resounded so well with so many Americans. If it were truly seen as a work of fiction, everybody would have agreed it was a rollicking good yarn, and left it at that. If it were truly seen as rewriting doctrine, everybody would have been up in arms. So why were so many people drawn to the vision that Dan Brown created in his story? I suspect the issues raised in such a discussion would pinpoint many of the problems with American Christianity as it’s practiced today.



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jsens

posted August 30, 2007 at 5:28 pm


What course is Jim teaching at the Harvard Divinity School?



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Mick Sheldon

posted August 30, 2007 at 6:04 pm


. In past years, I have assigned occasionally the first volume of “Left Behind” series as part of our look at the rise of the Christian Right in the late 20th century.
Posted by: carl copas
Good grief are you serious ? What do you use for the religious left , Howard Zinn ?



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Mick Sheldon

posted August 30, 2007 at 6:11 pm


I suspect the issues raised in such a discussion would pinpoint many of the problems with American Christianity as it’s practiced today.
Posted by: Jen
Jen I always thought it was we Americans seem to like conspiracy theories . 9/11 was an inside job , the grassy noll. Chenny was in cohoots with Haliburton to start a war for money , Clinton had Foster and others killed to protect secrets , the teletubies are a gay plot , etc .
Plus a conspiracy with a plot that somewhat goes against a traditional no n o , insulting the church , or like the Pope is ivolved in organized crime always adds to the plot . Causes Sort of the same incllination that makes people stop to look at an accident scene .



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kevin s.

posted August 31, 2007 at 12:46 am


“Good grief are you serious ? What do you use for the religious left , Howard Zinn ?”
Actually, while most conservative Christians I know reject LaHaye, Zinn is like a God to the left.
” If it were truly seen as rewriting doctrine, everybody would have been up in arms.”
Most people are pretty ignorant of doctrine.
“What course is Jim teaching at the Harvard Divinity School?”
REL303: Reinforcing your own values in an age when they are popular.



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I and I

posted August 31, 2007 at 10:35 am


Thanks for the recommendation of H. Richard Niehbur. When I was a student at Calvin College in the 1980′s, I took a class based largely upon that book. It more than anything else clarified the difference between the various approaches to Christianity and the person of Christ–particularly the difference between Reformed theology and fundamentalism. I’ll take your cue and reread it with the eyes of a jaded 40-something.



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I and I

posted August 31, 2007 at 10:39 am


“Actually, while most conservative Christians I know reject LaHaye, Zinn is like a God to the left.”
Glad to know the world revolves around Kevin’s experiences. Compare Left Behind sales to those of Zinn. ‘Nuff said.



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squeaky

posted August 31, 2007 at 12:07 pm


“Zinn is like a God to the left.”
Who?! Never heard of him.



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Anonymous

posted August 31, 2007 at 12:08 pm


Mick: “Good grief are you serious ? What do you use for the religious left , Howard Zinn ?”
Mick, I don’t use Left Behind only. I also use academic works such as William Martin, “With God on Our Side” and Michael Lienesch, “Redeeming America: Piety and Politics in the New Christian Right.” The reason for assigning Left Behind is that students find it fun to read, and it’s a good introduction to that particular kind of dispensationalism, with which many of my students have no familiarity.
As for Howard Zinn, I’ve used his “People’s History” in my U.S. survey course for many years. I also assign conservative texts to play off of Zinn. We have a lot of fun playing with sharply different interpretations of American history.
kevin s: I teach in California in a public university. As I’ve written before, “carl copas” is a nom de blog, not my real name. The reason is that I often address American religious history in my courses, and I prefer to keep my blogging and my teaching separate.



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squeaky

posted August 31, 2007 at 12:10 pm


“Jen I always thought it was we Americans seem to like conspiracy theories .”
Well…chuh! You forgot the favorites, though! JFK is still alive in a vegetative state on life support. Paul McCartney is dead. Hitler is now a South American dictator…



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Anonymous

posted August 31, 2007 at 12:40 pm


Another great book on Faith in the “public square,” (and also a thoughtful critique of the neo-traditionalism/Christian separatism of Stanley Hauerwas and Alisdair MacIntyre):
“Democracy and Tradition,” by Jeffrey Stout. Princeton Univ Press, 2005.
http://www.amazon.com/Democracy-Tradition-New-Forum-Books/dp/0691123829/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-6257068-7998410?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1188578202&sr=8-1



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Don

posted August 31, 2007 at 12:45 pm


…and Elvis Presley is alive and hiding out in a dingy London flat along with Salmon Rushdie, according to Far Side creator Gary Larson.
And there’s a real Sasquatch buried in Elvis’ “grave.”
D



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Karen

posted August 31, 2007 at 3:59 pm


Jim,
What about N.T Wright, Bonhoeffer, Harry Blamires, Os Guinness, ??
i urge you to put them on your list



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John

posted August 31, 2007 at 4:50 pm


Odd list from a Christian preacher… how come the Bible is no where to be found on the reading list?



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Mick Sheldon

posted August 31, 2007 at 5:01 pm


Paul McCartney is dead.
That is true one ,the Album cover proved that . ‘o)



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Mick Sheldon

posted August 31, 2007 at 5:15 pm


We have a lot of fun playing with sharply different interpretations of American history
Well , Ok , you convinced me of your class importance . I remember the best lectures I heard were by History professors on FDR . One gave from the perspective he was a great Preident , one was he was Ok but the times were great that he was engulfed in , and one was he was marginal and we were basically lucky . All used facts and good points . Had a great effect on me and how I read history after that . I get on ZInn because of his obvious prejudices, political view points , and his historical views are projected as much . But he is a source . Ok , you get an apple .



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carl copas

posted August 31, 2007 at 8:03 pm


“Ok , you get an apple .”
*shucks*



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Amazon Creek

posted September 1, 2007 at 2:38 am


Hi Don!
Yes, I agree. Personally, if I were writing a novel about the Tribulation, I would be acutely aware that if I included characters doing things God didn’t approve of – then I would need to be careful about portraying this as “human frailty” and not as “acceptable courses of action”. I’d feel responsible as an author for the influence I might have on non-discerning people.
I tried to say that in my post, at one point. Perhaps I didn’t emphasize it hard enough.
But at the same time, “art” is always very open to interpretation. Authors put things in there for all sorts of reasons.
I would be far more riled if a Christian non-fiction book advocated going incognito over at “Antichrist & Friends, Inc”. Because that would be clearly wrong advice.
With fiction, artistic license often allows inclusion of people’s misdeeds and misjudgments. Even the Scriptures includes the foibles of men and women of God – not to encourage us to copy them – but so we can learn the consequences.
The burden would be with the author to move the storyline around so that the foibles are NOT encouraged.
Don…actually, my views on prophecy are open to many ideas that the Left Behind series would find repulsive. I don’t necessarily buy the propaganda.
For example, I’m not really sure at what point the Rapture will occur…pre-Trib….or mid-Trib.
And I am paying v-e-r-y close attention to the fact that the United States of America, the richest, most influential country and military super-power in the world can’t seem to extricate ourselves from Iraq and has a military base in Baghdad. Iraq is ancient Babylon.
Connect the dots? Yuh….. we can’t seem to get out of ancient Babylon. I SERIOUSLY challenge the common dogma that the United States has no place in Revelation prophecy. It just might be staring us so hard in the face – that we’re completely blind to it. And that place might not be what we’d like our place to be.
And so…not sure how well I’d agree with Left Behind’s version of events.
But…now I’m getting off topic.
So…anyhow….sorry I didn’t make it clear enough that I do think an author should set a more responsible example of how to respond to such events than LaHaye did with some of the heroes actions.



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Susan

posted September 1, 2007 at 9:54 am


I would add The Misunderstood Jew by Amy Jill Levine and The Commentators Bible by Michael Curasik.



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Mick Sheldon

posted September 1, 2007 at 3:46 pm


My two cents ,
Blinded by Might , Why The Religious Right Can’t save America.
By Cal Thomas and Ed Dobson .
Good book in my opinion .



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Mick Sheldon

posted September 1, 2007 at 5:19 pm


Whoops , also
Why You Can’t Stay Silent ,By Tom Minnery
Gives an opposite view Of Blinded By Might . Both from conservative minded people and Bible believers . Opposing views . Both good reads , for me anyway .



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John

posted September 4, 2007 at 9:38 am


Again, while this was overlooked by all the literary psycho-babble:
Odd list from a Christian preacher… how come the Bible is no where to be found on the reading list?



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kevin s.

posted September 4, 2007 at 2:41 pm


John,
In fairness, Harvard Divinity does not begin with the premise that God exists. It is more the study of religion than it is a theological grounding in what God intended through scripture.



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Rick Nowlin

posted September 4, 2007 at 11:14 pm


Odd list from a Christian preacher… how come the Bible is no where to be found on the reading list?
Perhaps it was considered a given.



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kevin s.

posted September 5, 2007 at 12:46 am


“Perhaps it was considered a given.”
That is a weird concept for a divinity school. That the Bible is simply a given. Hmmm…



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John

posted September 5, 2007 at 9:02 am


Amen, Kevin.
People will love the love of knowledge more than love the Word of God…
I believe there is no greater diversion of people from the Word of God today than the secular humanistic world of our colleges and universities. What started out as a training school for Christian missionaries has evolved into one of the most liberal, secular humanistic institutions of our time: Yale University.
But Yale still has a divinity school, which I can only assume is on par with Harvard Divinity School regarding the which Kevin S. stated previously: In fairness, Harvard Divinity does not begin with the premise that God exists. It is more the study of religion than it is a theological grounding in what God intended through scripture.
It’s just a sign of the times.
Mikhail Gorbachev could recite all four gospels, but that didn’t make him a Christian. It was all head knowledge. You can have all the knowledge you want, but without wisdom, it’s all trivia. Wisdom comes from the Word. Wisdom is given by God. You remove God from any educational source including a “Divinity School” all you get is a mass of trivia minded individuals and a very wealthy educational institution.
People need to get right with God before they get left behind.



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I and I

posted September 6, 2007 at 10:52 am


I think you’re being a little judgemental here, John. Of course people need to have a heart- response to God, but there is room for theological diversity. Theologies of every stripe have made contributions to our cultural understanding of God and scripture, even liberal theologies. Chances are that whatever church you belong to is considered liberal by SOME other group or church somewhere, unless you’re Hutterite or Primitive Baptist. So let’s agree to disagree with Harvard and Yale if we must, but grant that there are at least some faculty and students there who are as earnestly seeking God as we are.



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I and I

posted September 6, 2007 at 10:53 am


Sorry, I meant “judgmental.”



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Larry Pullen

posted September 6, 2007 at 3:11 pm


While I know some of his books may be difficult to find I would recommend Reinhold Niebuhr’s writings, such as “Children of Light, Children of Darkness”. I think people confuse Reinhold with his brother Richard who wrote “Christ and Culture”. Sen. (and Episcopal priest)John Danforth in his recent book “Faith and Politics” says that what we need are more Reinhold Niebuhrs. That would be good because he was able to bridge many divides with the language he used and he constantly warned against national hubris.



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chaplain

posted September 18, 2007 at 10:19 am


Thanks for the comments, “I and I.” John, I must say you’re quite offensive to a graduate of Harvard Divinity School such as myself. HDS is absolutely not just a secular institution. It does, however, allow for a diversity of viewpoints to be considered rather than assuming only one theological truth. What’s so wrong with intellectually studying and learning about your own tradition and allowing it to be in conversation with other religions and world views? As for the students, I can attest that they spent their time with God in a variety of ways- worship, music, art, justice work- and are not just memorizing “trivia.” Many of us go on to careers in ministry thankful for the education we received in preparation for our work. The school is what you make of it, and I for one am thankful for its influence in my life and my ministry. It sounds like you haven’t spent much time getting to know the students, so perhaps you should refrain from the judgments.



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posted 10:11:56am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Verse of the Day: 'peace to the far and the near'
I have seen their ways, but I will heal them; I will lead them and repay them with comfort, creating for their mourners the fruit of the lips. Peace, peace, to the far and the near, says the Lord; and I will heal them. But the wicked are like the tossing sea that cannot keep still; its waters toss u

posted 9:35:01am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Daily News Digest (by Duane Shank)
the latest news on Mideast, Iran, Romney-Religious right, Blog action day, Turkey, SCHIP, Iran, Aids-Africa, India, Budget, Brownback-slavery apology, Canada, and selected op-eds. Sign up to receive our daily news summary via e-mail » Blog action day. Thousands of bloggers unite in blitz of green

posted 9:31:25am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »




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