God's Politics

God's Politics


Philip Rizk: Christians in Gaza

posted by God's Politics

During Hamas’ military takeover of Gaza in recent weeks, one of their biggest Fatah targets lay just behind a Greek Orthodox school in Gaza City. A friend of mine who lives near the school, himself a Christian and a Fatah security member, told me that Fatah security forces stationed themselves on the roof of the school building during attacks on their headquarters. Like many buildings that were used as strongholds during the fighting, the doors were blown open with a rocket-propelled grenade to ensure no resistance from inside. As widely reported in Western media, the chapel and the nun’s living quarters were vandalized, crosses were broken, and equipment was stolen. Looters were likely the perpetrators of this vandalism; Hamas was fighting a war, after all. Sadly, during the course of the chaotic fighting in Gaza this month many shops and homes were similarly looted.
I cannot excuse it, but I am reminded of a World Bank report, which stated that since 2000 the economic losses in Gaza have been more severe than those suffered during the Great Depression in the U.S. By 2002 the decline in real per capita GDP was almost 40 percent. In Gaza people are desperate. The world’s response to Hamas’ military takeover is even stricter closure. It is not just the Christians who are living in fear but rather the whole population; not just Christians in Gaza would leave here if they were given the opportunity.
Within days of the attack on the school, Hamas had identified some of the thieves and returned six stolen computers. Gaza’s Catholic priest, Emanuel Mussalam, was interviewed on Hamas radio, calling for the man who had ordered the forced entry into the chapel to be put on trial.
In light of the constantly deteriorating situation in Gaza, extremism has been on the rise and many unheard-of groups have formed, often in the name of Islam and with a fundamentalist agenda. These groups have carried out attacks against Internet cafes, cultural centers, and at times Christian entities, all in the name of religion.
Religious extremism is bound to rise up under conditions like those in Gaza. A number of times people I have visited who have lost multiple family members or their homes have told me that they have no where to turn but to God. I hope I could say the same if I ever find myself in a similar situation. Were these conditions to take place in the West, I think many suicides would be reported. Suicide is unacceptable in Arab society, and yet people are looking for a savior. The temptation of violence in the name of religion is one such idol.
None of these actions can be excused. But as outsiders we must look at the broader context. What is the root of the problem? Is it only the perpetrators that need to be condemned?
What Hamas carried out in Gaza practically took the shape of a coup, but one may ask: How does an elected government perpetrate a coup d’etat? Despite their election victory in 2006—an election that was largely forced by the U.S. policy of “democratization” of the region—Fatah, with the backing of the West and Israel, did not accept or consent to the outcome. Lawlessness peaked during the past year and a half for two reasons: First, the desperation in light of the economic siege placed on the Gaza Strip because of the Hamas government. Second, the existence of two governments and thus two security forces competing with each other, leading to chaos. The U.S. started funding Fatah to counter Hamas’ strength—a policy that for many Americans should bring to mind the Banana Republics of Latin America. This month Hamas responded with force, seeking to disable those security bodies that were receiving outside funds. What followed was four days of heavy fighting, over 100 deaths, and a Gaza Strip governed by just one political entity, Hamas.
One taxi driver explained life in Gaza this way: “Security is more important than bread, because what does one do with all the money in the world if you don’t have security to keep you alive to enjoy it?” Another driver told me a man can’t get married and say to his wife, “Good morning, habibti, my love,” and then disappear for the rest of the day without providing for her and their home. The first man is pointing out the positive—since their military takeover, Hamas has brought security. The second is speaking of the deteriorating economic conditions that were furthered by Hamas’ actions, a fear that has gripped much of the population because of the uncertainty of the future.

Philip Rizk is an Egyptian-German Christian who has lived in Gaza since August 2004, where he works and writes. He blogs at: tabulagaza.com



Advertisement
Comments read comments(31)
post a comment
Ben Wheaton

posted July 2, 2007 at 10:33 am


Hamas only needed to recognize Israel and renounce violence to receive recognition and funding. It did not, so the full blame lies with Hamas. Stop trying to apologize for a terrorist organization, and understand that the West cannot give money to terrorist groups. Hamas is a terrorist group.



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted July 2, 2007 at 11:18 am


Hamas only needed to recognize Israel and renounce violence to receive recognition and funding.
If it does that, especially the former, it will lose legitimacy in the Arab world. People don’t realize that the Arabs hate Israel because it is a constant reminder of Western imperialism.
And if I have my facts straight, Hamas actually was a creation of Israeli intelligence designed to weaken Yassir Arafat back in the day.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted July 2, 2007 at 11:47 am


“Is it only the perpetrators that need to be condemned?”
Yep.
“If it does that, especially the former, it will lose legitimacy in the Arab world.”
So?



report abuse
 

Ben Wheaton

posted July 2, 2007 at 12:24 pm


Rick, you do have your facts wrong. Hamas was not created by Mossad, but by Egypt’s muslim brotherhood. It is a murderous organization that deserves nothing but antagonism from the West until it reforms. If legitimacy in the Arab world if given by pledging to wipe out Israel, then it is a legitimacy that isn’t worth it.



report abuse
 

Wolverine

posted July 2, 2007 at 12:57 pm


And if I have my facts straight, Hamas actually was a creation of Israeli intelligence designed to weaken Yassir Arafat back in the day.
I have, to say the least, serious doubts about that. (Conspiracy theories about the Mossad being one of the products that the Palestinian Authority has ever successfully exported.) But even if it’s true, you gotta admit, it’s done its job thoroughly.
Wolverine



report abuse
 

Rick Nowlin

posted July 2, 2007 at 1:45 pm


FWIW, I got the info on Hamas from the New York Times, I think in 1998.



report abuse
 

MadHatter07

posted July 2, 2007 at 1:47 pm


This blog entry reads like one giant love note for Hamas, a group that proudly declares its intention to eliminate and kill all Jews. Fortunately, Israel has learned the meaning of “Never Again”. Props to Ben for his comments as well



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted July 2, 2007 at 2:11 pm


“FWIW, I got the info on Hamas from the New York Times”
Natch.
“This blog entry reads like one giant love note for Hamas”
Worse, it poses as a reasonable “let’s understand all sides of the issue” sort of piece. I’ve said this before, but drawing moral equivalency between Hamas and Israel is not at all an objective analysis.



report abuse
 

Eric

posted July 2, 2007 at 4:57 pm


So the equation goes like this – Hamas, a terrorist organization masquerading as a political party, is elected in the Palestinian territories. It won’t renounce terrorism or recognize Israel’s right to exist So it isn’t recognized by the West or by Israel and cut off economically. Economic desperation leads to suicide, but suicide is unacceptable to Muslims so they turn to homicide instead (forgetting that this wasn’t something commonly engaged in before Hamas was elected). So if only the West had recognized Hamas there would have been peace. Oh I forgot, and people turn to God in desperation so it’s completely normal behavior for someone in desperation to embrace radical Islam and want to kill and rob others that, several days before, they were living peacefully next to.
Actually, what has happened is that Israel has gotten so good at preventing Palestinians from attacking them that the radicals have to find someone on whom to turn and blame their problems. It’s sad that it is their own people.



report abuse
 

carl copas

posted July 2, 2007 at 5:25 pm


Philip,
it’s always good to hear from people who actually have been on the ground. If I want to hear uninformed comments from provincial blowhards I’ll head down to the corner bar or turn on Faux News.



report abuse
 

Kevin Wayne

posted July 2, 2007 at 7:19 pm


“Is it only the perpetrators that need to be condemned?”
Yep.
“If it does that, especially the former, it will lose legitimacy in the Arab world.”
So?
Posted by: kevin s. | July 2, 2007 11:47 AM

Oh, well.. the nation calling itself Israel in the mideast is an unbiblical pretender anyway.



report abuse
 

eileen fleming

posted July 2, 2007 at 8:40 pm


The ROOT of the violence is easy to understand:
1.4 million people inhabit an open air prison and THE 40 years of OCCUPATION of Palestine has persisted in Gaza after the ‘disengagement’ for Israel NEVER gave up control of air, land and sea borders.
But, my dear Christian sisters and brothers, you can DO SOMETHING and just today I received a thank you for a donation I sent to St James Episcopal Church in Austin Texas that was wired to Ahli Arab Hospital which is in dire straits!
Rev Dr. Greg Rickel and Rev Ed Hartwell wrote to me on June 26, 2007:
“For now the fighting seems to have subsided, but conditions in Gaza continue to be brutal with no outside relief provided by the U.S. or EU.”
YOU can DO SOMETHING too for the least, the outcast, the prisoners, the refugees, widows and orphans in Gaza:
http://www.StJamesAustin.org
http://www.episcopalchurch.org/80050_86566_ENG_HTM.htm
eileen fleming, author “MEMOIRS OF A NICE IRISH-AMERICAN ‘GIRL’S’ LIFE IN OCCUPIED TERRITORY”
reporter and editor
http://www.wearewideawake.org/



report abuse
 

Hali

posted July 2, 2007 at 8:46 pm


“And if I have my facts straight, Hamas actually was a creation of Israeli intelligence designed to weaken Yassir Arafat back in the day.”
Rick, actually, you’re close to right. Hammas started as a social services oriented religious organization, and it was supported by Shin Bet (Mossad isn’t the only Israeli intelligence org, Ben) in order to interfere with Yassir Arafat, who was pretty much dominant at the time. I do not believe that Shin Bet realized how dangerous it was. Like the U.S. didn’t realize how dangerous the mujahedin were in Soviet-era Afghanistan. Ooops!



report abuse
 

MadHatter07

posted July 2, 2007 at 10:02 pm


Eileen:The roots are very easy to understand:Even before Israel was created, the Arabs of the region were out to kill the Jews of the region:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1929_Palestine_massacrehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amin_al-HusayniThis continued with the Arab attack in 1948, an attempt to wipe Israel out, even though Palestinians had also been promised a state.Despite offers from the Israelis for peace, most notably at Camp David in 2000, the Palestinians have always responded with more violence and death in their attempt to push Israel into the sea. When Palestinians and their supporters in the region begin to love their children more than they wish to push Israel into the sea, then they will be able to live in peace and prosperity. Until that point, they deserve neither.



report abuse
 

Sarasotakid

posted July 2, 2007 at 10:02 pm


Funny that Rizk is labeled a Hamas sympathizer for the mere fact of stating that when people are pushed far enough, they’ll turn to the extremes. How radical! How revolutionary! The critics of the article ignore the fact that he says no less than two times that there is no excuse for Hamas’s actions. But how dare he try to look to the causes?



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted July 2, 2007 at 11:07 pm


“Oh, well.. the nation calling itself Israel in the mideast is an unbiblical pretender anyway.”
Beneath the surface, this is Sojo’s prespective on the issue, an that saddens me. I apologize to any Jews reading this. Most Christians do not feel this way. At all. This is not the perspective of Christ. I say that because there are a number of blogs on Beliefnet that visit here. I am with you, and I have the deepest respect for your people and for Israel. Please do not take the comments of ignorant political opportunists to be representative of Christianity.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted July 2, 2007 at 11:25 pm


“Funny that Rizk is labeled a Hamas sympathizer for the mere fact of stating that when people are pushed far enough, they’ll turn to the extremes. How radical! How revolutionary! The critics of the article ignore the fact that he says no less than two times that there is no excuse for Hamas’s actions. But how dare he try to look to the causes?”
If the causes are, in fact, causes, then they excuse the behavior. If not, then they do not. There is no difference between the cause an the excuse.



report abuse
 

Wolverine

posted July 3, 2007 at 9:14 am


…when people are pushed far enough, they’ll turn to the extremes.
There’s some truth in that, the question is: “Who’s doing the pushing?” Israel, whose main goal is to live in relative peace within reasonably secure borders, or Palestinian and Arab leaders who have been offered a Palestinian state several times and opted consistently for an increasingly suicidal war to destroy Israel?
As for Rizk, his entire approach to Hamas can be summed up in the first five words of the second paragraph:
I cannot excuse it, but…
I think those five words pretty much sum up the entire problem with the middle east. The Palestinian leaders in Fatah and Hamas are an awful bunch who have themselves contributed greatly to the suffering of the Palestinian people. Fatah is a criminal gang, while Hamas is a group of homicidal religious maniacs. And yet we treat them as if they represented the interests of the Palestinian people.
One doesn’t have to support Israel on every issue to recognize that Palestinian politics is a contest between thugs and lunatics, and that it’s time we in the west quit trying to make excuses for them.
Wolverine



report abuse
 

Sarasotakid

posted July 3, 2007 at 9:44 am


I firmly believe in Israel’s right to exist. I have been there, having spent more than two months there and having lived amongst Israelis. I have no sympathy for Hamas.
But it is the long Israeli occupation of the territories captured in 1967 that gave rise to these groups. Israeli settlements have added fuel to the fire. In many instances if a family member participated in a terrorist act unknown to the parents, the Israeli army would go dynamite the entire family’s house regardless of the culpability of the other family members. How would you feel if one of your children, unknown to you commits a heinous act and then the police come and destroy your home?
We cannot condone terrorism on either side. But the Palestinians do have a story to be told and they must have justice as well. They have been a political pawn for the neighboring Arab states and for the Israelis. Jordan held the west bank (and Egypt Gaza) from 1948 to 1967 and did not create a Palestinian state. But two wrongs don’t make a right.



report abuse
 

Kristi

posted July 3, 2007 at 7:21 pm


Kevin Wayne is exactly right when he says that the nation of Israel, as it stands,is NOT the same one that we are supposed to be supporting as stated biblically. They are NOT following God’s commandments for his people whatsoever, and they are overwhelmingly secular. And as Sara said—Israel is NOT exempt from terrorist behavior.
BUT I also agree with Wolverine, that Palestinian politics IS a contest between thugs and lunatics. So where does that leave us poor helpless Christians in the U.S.? Well first of all we need to pray for ALL the innocent civilians in that region—every single one of them. Secondly, we need to give to a charity that IS doing something over there to help, like the one Eileen mentioned. Thirdly, we need to quit seeing all Israelis as angels and and all Palestinians as devils. MANY Palestinians are Christian, by the way and I think that many of us forget that. AND many Israelis are good Jews, and a few are Christian, but MANY are Zionist Secularists that have nothing but hatred and homicide in their hearts for Palestinians NO MATTER their faith or affiliation.
Stop polarizing—none of this is black and white.



report abuse
 

Susan

posted July 3, 2007 at 7:35 pm


Hamas leaders have been planing this takeover since Israel withdrew from Gaza.
Palestinians knew before the elections that a Hamas led government would be boycotted. Yet, they voted for Hamas anyway. Democracy also means taking responsibility for your vote.
Kristi, You are wrong. Most secular Israelis do not hate Arabs or Palestinians. Indeed, many of them are in the peace movement or have dovish positions on the conflict.
Hamas is an organization with a Nazi-like hatred for ALL Jews everywhere. Negotiating with Hamas would be like negotiating with the KKK or the Nazis.
I’m not saying that Israel is perfect, but I read a survey today that showed that most Israelis, including secular Israelis, want peace with the Palestinians. Most Israelis don’t want to occupay anyone. As a matter of fact, Kristi, it is the religious right extremists who hate Arabs. They are a small percent of Israeli society, but they dod exist.



report abuse
 

Merle

posted July 3, 2007 at 8:58 pm


Israel MUST drop its precondition of recognition by Hamas for there to be serious dialogue among equals. The needs of all the peoples and nations of the Middle East must be considered if there is to be a lasting peace. The United States should refrain from attempting to impose a solution or from showing favoritism toward any one country. There is sufficient leadership in the Middle East from countries such as Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Iran and others to work out boundaries, basic rights, return of refugees, etc. It also goes without saying that the United States must withdraw from Iraq immediately for any of this to work.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted July 4, 2007 at 7:07 am


If the causes are, in fact, causes, then they excuse the behavior. If not, then they do not. There is no difference between the cause an the excuse. Posted by: kevin s.
Nobody on this blog is excusing Hamas. What is disconcerting, though, is that there is no objective analysis of Israel’s role in creating and perpetuating this mess. Some here have called Hamas a Nazi-like organization, which is probably an accurate depiction of what it is. But most people would agree there were causes for the rise of the Nazis prior to WWII– like for example the draconian measures (war reparations, etc.) embodied in the Treaty of Versailles. In saying that, that does not make one a Nazi sympathizer. Why is it so hard to try to analyze cause and effect when it comes to Israel and the Palestinians?



report abuse
 

Susan

posted July 4, 2007 at 7:40 am


Merle, I agree there “needs to be a serious dialogue among equals.” Hamas does not see Israel or Jews as equals. It seems Jews as uniquely evil. It does not think there should be a Jewish state. It thinks that there should be an Islamic state based on Hamas’s idea of sharia law. Jews would become permanent second-class citizens under a Hamas led state.
Nazi literature entered the Arab world before WWII began. The Grand Mufti of Jerusalem was a personal friend of Hitler. It began way before the occupation or even the establishment of the state of Israel. Be careful when you talk about causes.
This is from the Sephardi Holocaust Recognition Project, http://www.farhud.org, on a massacre of Iraqi Jews in 1941. The Grand Mufti of Jerusalem also played a role in this event as well.
“That day in 1941, on the Jewish festival of Shavuot, the sight of Jews returning from the Baghdad airport to greet the returning Regent Abdul al-Ilah, ruler of Iraq, was all the excuse an Iraqi mob needed to unleash its vengeance. The attack began at 3 p.m., as the Jewish delegation crossed Baghdad’s Al Khurr Bridge. Violence quickly spread to the Al Rusafa and Abu Sifyan districts. The frenzied mob murdered Jews openly on the streets. Women were raped and infants were killed as their horrified families looked on. Torture and mutilation followed.
Jewish shops were looted and torched. A synagogue was invaded, burned, and its Torahs destroyed in classic Nazi fashion. The shooting, burning and mayhem continued throughout the evening. Jews were dragged from their automobiles. Homes were invaded, looted and burned. On June 2, the fury continued with policemen and slum dwellers joining in.
The Farhud was the beginning of the end of 2,600 years of Jewish life in Iraq. This event commenced with a rampage of mass murder, mutilation, rape, burning and looting. The carnage would be forever seared upon the collective Iraqi Jewish consciousness.”
I should add that Jews could be accpeted and tolerated in Iraq, but they were never equals. The question is can the Islamic world accept Jews as equals.



report abuse
 

Bill Samuel

posted July 4, 2007 at 10:32 am


How come you never see the American Republican and Democratic Parties castigated as terrorists masquerading as political parties? These two parties have done far more in terms of killing people in advance of their ends than Hamas has ever done.
Ironically, many of those who castigate Hamas praise Israeli and American actions that only escape the label of terrorism because the actions are done by duly recognized governments.
I’m not justifying the military actions of Hamas. I’m just pointing out the hypocrisy of those who criticize violence when done by those who don’t have the cover of being recognized governments while being silent or at least muted about the much greater violence committed by the likes of the American, Israeli and British governments.
We reap what we sow. Our attention should be more on changing our government here in the U.S., run by two militarist imperialist parties, than on changing Hamas.



report abuse
 

moderatelad

posted July 5, 2007 at 2:56 pm


You know I do care and I would like to say something but I can not keep up with everything that Sojo seems to feel needs to be dealt with.
Sojo is steamrolling along from issues to issue and I con only deal with a issue or two individually as I like to be involved and make a difference – not just jaw-jack about it.
Blessings on you and all that you do on behalf of the kingdom.
later -
.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted July 5, 2007 at 3:45 pm


I did not say that the secular state of Israel hates the Palestinians, only that they are Zionist, and therefore want the land that has been biblically staked out for the Jews, and they really don’t care how that happens. They turn a blind eye to Israeli religious zealots that are perpetrating their terrorism, and then crack down on Palestinians who do the same. I also know that many secular citizens have no desire to force the Palestinians out. I guess I made two points at once, which was confusing. We as Christians do not have an obligation to back the recognized Israel government, because it is secular, but they will invoke the idea of a “biblical land of the Jews” in order to back their Zionist (nationalist) agenda.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted July 6, 2007 at 12:28 am


“Thirdly, we need to quit seeing all Israelis as angels and and all Palestinians as devils. MANY Palestinians are Christian, by the way and I think that many of us forget that. ”
Sure. And many of the people in Palestine are victims of terrorism perpetuated by their own government. My point is not to unilaterally praise Israel, and you are correct that the dispensationalist view of Israel really shouldn’t affect our policy-making.
However, there is a clearly one agent that, at present, is far more desirous of peace than the other. That, for me, resolves what Bill S. describes as hypocrisy. It is not the mere act of violence that I condemn, but rather the intentions behind it.
“Why is it so hard to try to analyze cause and effect when it comes to Israel and the Palestinians?”
I think it has been analyzed to death. It does not change my view that Israel is well within its rights to defend its people, and that Palestine has no right to attack them.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted July 6, 2007 at 3:18 am


It does not change my view that Israel is well within its rights to defend its people, and that Palestine has no right to attack them. Kevin S.
If it were as simple and one sided as you seem to think that it is, then the reactionary policies you support would make sense. But it isn’t and they don’t. It must feel good to think you know everythng but you don’t and you prove that with each clever little entry you make.



report abuse
 

StevoR

posted September 15, 2007 at 10:54 am


Hamas was indeed created by the Israelis to undermine the then PLO (now Fatah)
Israel could end almost all this strife by ending their illegal Occupation and fully recognising accepting :
1) the humanity and inalienable human rights of the Palestineans,
2) the grave injustice done to thePalestineans by the creation of Israel on their land
3) The full rights and sovereignty of a Palestinean state taking in all the lands conquered by brute force in 1967 includinmg East Jerusalem. This meansd controrl of their own boarders, land, air and sea and fredom frommilitary attacks and so-called “targetted” political assassinations opf palwestienan leaders.
Israel too has an ethical duty to compensate the Palestineans for teh damage uits done theirm economically, culturally and emotionally. If the Palestien-Isreal conflict was a court case tired by areasonable unbiased judge the Palestineans would win major, major, major punitive damages for the Israeli conduct against them.
A South African style ‘National Reconciliation Tribunal’ toncover tehtruth of Isreali war criems and atrocities would also be a great step forward inresolving this dispute.
I suggest ratehr than blasting me for putting the other side, Jewish lobbyists consider taking thsi course of actionabove. Afterall their on-going military repression is clearly NOT working in anybody’s favour -including, ultimately their own.
Finally, does the Jews famous “Never Again” (of the Shoah-Nazi Holocaust) apply to Jews only or should it really be “Never again to ANYBODY”??
Because quite frankly, its the Isrealis now who are acting like Nazi’s and the Palestineans who they are treating like Shoah-time Jews. The Palestineans whether under Hamas or Fatah governance are the latest Semitic victims & scapegoats – and, lets never forget, the Palestineans are Semites (a brother /sister people of the Jews) too – making the Jewish state, very ironically, the last anti-Semitic nation on the planet! Sad but true.
Shalom, Salaam & Peace unto you all.



report abuse
 

StevoR

posted September 15, 2007 at 11:28 am


Three good reasons why Israel should do as I suggest above :
1) It is in the wrong historically and in the present for displacing, occupying and persecuting the Palestineans.
2) As the stronger party of the two – with nuclear weapions and US backing – it is in afarbetter position (now anyway) to do so and can afford to be magnaminous in doing the right thing.
3) Doing the right thing – ending the Occupation and fully recognising and atoning for its past sins would guarantee it huge political and ethical capital – Israel would be & importantly would be _seen_ to be acting properly & this would win it international support and ensure even its enemies respect – the Arab and other South-West Asian nations could then make peace on fair terms with Israel and acknowldge it fully as it has acknowledged the Palestineans.
So ‘Do unto others as ye would be done unto’ – want Isreal to be recognised? Then recognise Palestine!
Want to stop the killing of Israelis? Stop killing
Palestineans!
Fromapractical perspective too, nothing we say is likely to influence Hamas to change its policy (threatening, blockading & otherwise attacking it is likely to make it harden its stance further, yet talk and it is unlikely to listen) – but Israel and the Jewish lobby claims and hopefully really is able to listen todemocratic voices and behave in an enlightenedrather than purely savage manner.
Please consider these points -and note I wish no harm to Jews or Israelis and support their rights as well as the Palestineans – just at this moment the Jews are running the pogrom the Palestinenas are enduring not vice-versa…
Again, Shalom, Salaam & Peace to y’all.



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting God's Politics. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:14:07am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Why I Work for Immigration Reform (by Patty Kupfer)
When I tell people that I work on immigration reform, they usually laugh or say, "way to pick an easy topic." Everyday it feels like there is more fear, more hate. Raids are picking up in Nevada, California, and New York. A number of senators who supported comprehensive reform only a few months ago

posted 12:30:52pm Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Audio: Jim Wallis on "Value Voters" on The Tavis Smiley Show
Last week Jim was on The Tavis Smiley Show and talked about how the changing political landscape will affect the upcoming '08 election. Jim and Ken Blackwell, former Ohio secretary of state, debated and discussed both the impact of "value voters" on the election and what those values entail. + Down

posted 10:11:56am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Verse of the Day: 'peace to the far and the near'
I have seen their ways, but I will heal them; I will lead them and repay them with comfort, creating for their mourners the fruit of the lips. Peace, peace, to the far and the near, says the Lord; and I will heal them. But the wicked are like the tossing sea that cannot keep still; its waters toss u

posted 9:35:01am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Daily News Digest (by Duane Shank)
the latest news on Mideast, Iran, Romney-Religious right, Blog action day, Turkey, SCHIP, Iran, Aids-Africa, India, Budget, Brownback-slavery apology, Canada, and selected op-eds. Sign up to receive our daily news summary via e-mail » Blog action day. Thousands of bloggers unite in blitz of green

posted 9:31:25am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.