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God's Politics


Bob Francis: Charity and Justice after Katrina

posted by gp_intern

Much has been written about Katrina since that devastating storm ravaged the Gulf Coast a year and a half ago. Many organizations, including Sojourners/Call to Renewal, have seized upon this situation to remind us that there are still two Americas – one poor and forgotten and the other rich and resourced – and that while charity can rebuild houses, governments must rebuild levees.

While I believe that those things are true, my week-long visit to the Gulf Coast last week showed me how complicated this situation is on the ground. Like the twisted piles of debris filling lots and dotting residential curbs, there are many convolutions to the story, and there seems to be enough praise and blame to go around. It might be years before we’ve unraveled all that happened and how we can avoid reliving it.

Notwithstanding the important task of backward-looking and learning from past mistakes, Hurricane Katrina has now provided our nation with an opportunity, going forward, to show how effectively we can rebuild, revitalize, and replenish the Gulf Coast for all residents – if all sectors work in concert. It will take both private and public money, personal and political will, step ladders and savvy legislation. It is not an issue for just the Right or the Left, only Republicans or Democrats. It will take sweat equity and compassionate public policy. But what we must agree upon is to rebuild the coast and its cities for ALL residents, not just those with certain means. As one advocate asked in an e-mail, “How do we do justice to the families who lost everything (including the lives of friends and family members) and were forced to leave during the 2005 disasters? How do we make sure that everyone has a home to return to?”

As expected, the church has responded with overwhelming financial and manual support – thousands of volunteers and millions of dollars have rebuilt countless homes and lives, work not necessarily possible (or fitting) for the government to handle. But if our involvement stops there, we will have failed, for that is only half of the story. It is charity and justice we seek.

Fierce local legislative battles are already underway about such issues as affordable housing policy, development practices, and insurance and government reparations (or the lack thereof).
Band-aids of bricks and mortar do not address the underlying policies that currently have made it virtually impossible for thousands of families to come home and rebuild their lives. Some municipalities have seen this disaster as an opportunity to rid their towns of “undesirable elements” like public housing and the poor, and advocates on the ground are in daily fights to win even the slightest consideration for “the least of these” among us.

It is apparent upon visiting the Mississippi coast that the market and local policy has freely allowed casinos, condos, hotels, and restaurant chains to quickly rebuild. But the call of Christ is to a kingdom where the last are first and in which we have a preferential option to the poor. Unless that priority is intentionally built into the public policy and practice of rebuilding, they will not be remembered. It is up to us – not just to paint walls – but to make sure, on every level, that those that the market forgets have a place they can call home.

Bob Francis is the Policy and Organizing Assistant for Sojourners/Call to Renewal. He traveled to Biloxi, Mississippi, in support of the United Church of Christ’s Back Bay Mission with five fellow staff members in partnership with a work team from Pilgrim UCC of Wheaton, Maryland.

+ See multimedia from Sojourners/Call to Renewal’s first Gulf Coast work project in July 2006



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kevin s.

posted April 16, 2007 at 3:47 pm


But the casinos, hotels and restaurants attract tourists, money and jobs. People won’t return to an area where they cannot find employment. It is interesting that the author notes that this is a complicated situation, but then ends with a very simplistic conclusion.



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splinterlog

posted April 16, 2007 at 4:23 pm


And it’s interesting that you read the conclusion but didn’t read the last line: but to make sure, on every level, that those that the market forgets have a place they can call home.



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jesse

posted April 16, 2007 at 4:59 pm


I grew up in New Orleans and have been back twice since Katrina. When you tour through many neighborhoods, you feel overwhelmed by how much work there is to do. There is a legitimate debate to be had over whether billions of dollars should be spent restoring an area that remains so vulnerable to hurricanes (I’m speaking here just of New Orleans, not the surrounding area that is above ground). You’d think that strengthening levees would be priority #1. If only things were so simple in Louisiana politics! The other factor inhibiting the return of many is job availability, of course. I also think that a sort of critical mass has to be reached in many neighborhoods for people to return. If you’ve driven through any neighborhoods that were flooded, you’d understand that you can’t just rebuild one house to get one family back. It’s gonna take rebuilding hundreds of neighborhoods. They’re gonna need the jobs to return. And all of this is going to take a lot of time.



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Mike

posted April 16, 2007 at 5:06 pm


We also have to consider the “working at the speed of government factor.” Last July, a group from our church cleaned out a house in Kenner. After the houses are cleaned out, they must be inspected and certified for rebuilding. As of this January (six months later) the family was still waiting on an inspection. It angers me that President Bush was personally attacked by liberals and Halliburton-type conspiracy kooks for allowing the government to award work contracts without having to wait on the standard competitive bidding process, which usually takes years. And now these same liberals are angry because government bureaucracy is so slow.



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nad2

posted April 16, 2007 at 5:17 pm


i grew up on the ms coast, just across the no-longer-existent bridge to biloxi. i return to visit my parents as oft i can, relative to the rest, their 2 feet of water & complete remodeling of the downstairs of their home was pretty modest. the issue raised here is a very real one – affordable housing. businesses that are up & running down there are struggling to find workers because, among others reasons, workers cannot find housing they can afford. the problems of the poor on the coast are quickly becoming the problems of the vested interests. yet, in a turbulent rebuilding time where everyone is looking out for themselves (some for financial survival, others for financial windfall) condo developers are quickly gobbling up areas that once had low-income & moderate housing. the ms coast was not, pre-katrina, simply a resort area. 15 years ago casinos were just showing up & a vibrant, very diverse (including strong slovic & asian presence) culture existed that learned to co-exist & largely embrace the gaming industry, but gaming was only one of several defining cultural aspects of the coast. but what appears to be happening is that a national tragedy is being used to transform the ms coast into something that it wasn’t pre-katrina (a resort destination w/ condos like those littering FL), & unfortunately it doesn’t include places to live for lower income folks.



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moderatelad

posted April 16, 2007 at 8:03 pm


I have sent a significant amount of money that I designate every year for donations to Not-For-Profits over what I give to my church. Some of the stories are heart warming and others make you incensed as to what people will do with money given to them for food and clothing gets spent on TV and CD Players. It is also unsettling to know that they are rebuilding the levy to handle a category 3 storm like before – if the predictions are correct that 07 could be a banner year for hurricanes – why are they not rebuilding and restructuring for a cat. 5?In the Fargo/Moorhead area of MN and ND, people were told that they would not be able to rebuild their house in the original location because they were going to restructure for another flooding disaster so that they could handle it better.Earth to Gov Kathleen and the Mayor – you looking ahead and thinking about what to do so that this does not happen again????? I will continue to pray and send money to assist the recovery of the Gulf Coast. Later – .



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neuro_nurse

posted April 16, 2007 at 11:41 pm


moderatelad The Mississippi River levees are built and maintained by the Army Crops of Engineers, which is federally funded. Neither the governor of Louisiana nor the mayor of New Orleans have much control over the repair and maintenance of the levee system.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been building levees along the Mississippi River since the late 1800s. The artificial, reenforced soil embankments are designed to curb periodic and destructive floods. But determining the level of protection needed versus what Congress and the public are willing to pay for isn’t often easy. Acceptable risks must be weighed, including the statistical likelihood of catastrophic events and the possible consequences if they do occur, according to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials. Ultimately, congressional funding levels largely determine just how high the embankments will reach and what levels of risk will be accepted.http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/09/0902_050902_katrina_levees.htmlNBC News has obtained what may be a key clue, hidden in long forgotten legal documents. They reveal that when the floodwall on the 17th Street Canal was built a decade ago, there were major construction problems problems brought to the attention of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.A 1998 ruling, by an administrative judge for the Corps’ Board of Contract Appeals, shows that the contractor, Pittman Construction, told the Corps that the soil and the foundation for the walls were not of sufficient strength, rigidity and stability to build on.http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9532037



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 1:37 am


neuro_nurse | 04.16.07 – 5:46 pm | #What you say is true. But there was monies set aside in the late 80’s to make the levys stronger. It was the states descression as to how it was to be spent. They made the decision to build cassions and then take the proceeds to assist with flood control. Surprise – the cassions seem to never turn a profit. The governor can request that the federal gov’t make improvements to assure their populations safety – saddly, she never has. I believe that we will be spending billions more as they just do the same old thing down there because ‘someone’ will always help.Like a wrote before – the Fargo/Moorehead region of our state prevented some people from rebuilding their houses because they are planning that this could/might happen again and they want to be better prepared for it – wish NO would look at their situation the same way. Later – .



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neuro_nurse

posted April 17, 2007 at 1:42 am


moderatelad If you really want to know about rebuilding in New Orleans, regulations, permits, recommendations, why don’t you browse the City of New Orleans website. It’s not the free-for-all you make it out to be. http://www.cityofno.com/portal.aspx



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 2:04 am


neuro_nurse | 04.16.07 – 7:47 pm | #I am not saying that it is a free for all. But are you telling me that if the Fed. Gov’t. mandates something – we just have to accept it? None of the writers on this site would believe that one. The Governor – if She was doing her job would demand more – saddly she has proven to be out to lunch on this. I a white mayor had said something to the same effect that the mayor of NO did – (choc city) they would have been hung out to dry. They mayors of Fargo and Moorehead and the governors of MN and ND demanded more and they are getting it – they have a vision.Later – .



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neuro_nurse

posted April 17, 2007 at 2:32 am


“…there was monies set aside in the late 80’s to make the levys stronger. It was the states descression as to how it was to be spent. They made the decision to build cassions and then take the proceeds to assist with flood control.” (sic) What’s your source for that? I m not going to defend Blanco or Nagin. I am old enough to remember the Parliament song “Chocolate City.” One of the things I loved about pre-Katrina New Orleans was that it had an African-American majority. The demographics have changed in post-Katrina New Orleans, so while Nagin’s “Chocolate City” comment was been the subject of derision, some of us understood what he was saying. There is a very long history of corruption and good ol boy politics in Louisiana pretty much since Bienville and Iberville first set foot in the swamp that is now New Orleans. If it makes you happy, Kathleen Blanco has announced that she will not run for re-election. Meanwhile: Corps chief admits to ‘design failure’ Thursday, April 06, 2006 By Bill Walsh The Times-Picayune http://www.nola.com/frontpage/t-p/index.ssf?/base/news-5/1144306231230500.xml http://www.factcheck.org/article344.html



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Sarasotakid

posted April 17, 2007 at 3:32 am


“But are you telling me that if the Fed. Gov’t. mandates something – we just have to accept it?”Uh, yeah when it is the Federal Government jurisdiction and they hold the purse strings. It’s called Federal preemption. “I a white mayor had said something to the same effect that the mayor of NO did – (choc city) they would have been hung out to dry.” I wouldn’t deny that there is a double standard here between what caucasian and non-caucasian politicians get away with saying. But it would appear that you are bringing these things up to divert the attention from FEMA’s (and ultimately Bush’s) dropping the ball on New Orleans.



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jesse

posted April 17, 2007 at 4:35 am


The Mississippi River levees are built and maintained by the Army Crops of Engineers, which is federally funded. –Neuronurse, you live in New Orleans, so you must be familiar with the corrupt local levee board system.http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9342186/



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 4:50 am


Sarasotakid | 04.16.07 – 9:37 pm | #divert the attention from FEMA’s (and ultimately Bush’s) dropping the ball NOT!!! FEMA and the Federal Gov’t can not just waltz into a state and take charge. The states are autonomous in that respect. States all along the eastern seaboard have contact DC in advance of a hurricane and put them on notice about what they might need in case they are hit. Sadly – Kathleen did not do this. When Andrew hit FL – things were already in the works for assistance from FEMA just like they have done in the state ever since FEMA was conceived.DGIH – I think that some of you if you wake up on the wrong side of the bed – it is Bush’s fault. I am not going to be a part of this. Not all the ills of the earth are the fault of the current administration and governors of states have to step up to the plate and give leadership – sadly – Kathleen has failed – period. Later – .



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neuro_nurse

posted April 17, 2007 at 6:53 am


moderatelad Oh come on! You defend bush but lay the blame at the feet of a governor who had not been in office two years before Katrina! “Not all the ills of the earth are the fault of the current administration” No, but the one that really matters is.



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 3:58 pm


neuro_nurse | 04.17.07 – 12:58 am | #Gov Kathy did not come out of the sticks and get elected governor – she was a political player and knew how things work. I really don’t care if she was in for two months. LA should have a plan in place for these types of disasters – it is not the first time they have been hit by a storm and it will not be the last. NOW – if they experienced a volcano erupting in their state – I would expect some confusion…not a hurricane. Bush was in the Oval Office a matter of months and many seem to be willing to blame him for 9-11. Some say he was even in on it prior to it happening. (looks like S. Burger and his destroying archive records will protect the Clintons for what they might have known and did not tell the next adm.) I am not protecting Bush – history will deal with him. I just want to hold everyone to the same standard. I going to take my drugs now… Later – .



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 4:01 pm


neuro_nurse | 04.17.07 – 12:58 am | #No, but the one that really matters is. So – the way the UN has delt with matters or not delt with them – gives them a ‘bye’ on what is wrong with the world? This is why I say – Stay Home with Sojo! Because all we will do is talk and bottom line – they do not care. Later – (drugs have not kicked it yet…tee hee) .



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Sarasotakid

posted April 17, 2007 at 7:31 pm


divert the attention from FEMA’s (and ultimately Bush’s) dropping the ball NOT!!! Moderatelad Fortunately the majority of the American people did not see it that way and that is why Congress is no longer controlled by the Republicans. “DGIH – I think that some of you if you wake up on the wrong side of the bed – it is Bush’s fault. I am not going to be a part of this. Not all the ills of the earth are the fault of the current administration and governors of states have to step up to the plate and give leadership – sadly – Kathleen has failed – period.” Moderatelad You’re a great apologist for Bush. Unfortunately you defend the indefensible. By you silence, I guess you did concede that it is the Federal Govt. that was responsible for levees. Or maybe we can blame that one on Elvis!In any event, I see you approach any of these problems attempting to divert the blame from the Republicans to the Democrats. That is your prerogative as much as it is your prerogative to undermine your own credibility. “This is why I say – Stay Home with Sojo! Because all we will do is talk and bottom line – they do not care.” It is precisely because the DO care that they call this administration to accountability for its misdeeds.



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 7:54 pm


Sarasotakid | 04.17.07 – 1:36 pm | #Yes – you could stand in front of a Sojo gathering and ask who cared and the majority of hands would go up. But when you tell them what it will cost them and others to fix the situation – not too many would be willing to get dirty. They will talk about what needs to be done – how it could be done – how they will raise the money – but most of them will just take. The basic answer for most of the issues that Sojo talks about is ‘impeach Bush’. Personally I did not blame Clinton for the flooding on the Red River that caused millions of dollors in damage. MN has seen many of their citizens go down and work in NO and the Gulf as well as hundreds of thousands of dollors in contributions. When the Red River Valley was devistated by a flood – how much came from LA or NO when it comes to aid – a percent of a percent – basically nothing.I would perfer to look at what happened and what should have been done so in the future people are better prepared for what might happen. It is the writers on Sojo that the answer is ‘impeach Bush’. Really encourages me to enter into the conservation in a meaningful way to come to consensus on the issue. SO – let just lay to foundation for the future discussions on Sojo so that it will easier for all. I have a headache and hormonally inflected – impeach Bush My boss is a real swine and can’t keep his hands off me – impeach Bush Evil is running rampet throughout the world and is out of control – impeach Bush Gas prices are hitting $2.80 – impeach Bush Radical Islamist are blowing themselves up in school yards and shopping centers – impeach Bush. I do hope I have made you feel better and less stressed – but if you feel bad remember the answer if – Impeach Bush. Life it so simple when the answer to all that pisses you off is – impeach Bush. Whatever – .



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neuro_nurse

posted April 17, 2007 at 8:07 pm


moderatelad I have this perception of bush apologist, and I will be fair to you and say that I am not necessarily generalizing this observation to you, that there is a lack of admissibility in finding fault with this president. I voted for Clinton, I liked him, I still do, but he was far from perfect. Some of the things he did in office were, IMHO, stupid. I also have this impression, again, not necessarily generalizing this assessment to you, that some Republican Christians mistake bush apologetics and Republican partisanship with Christian doctrine, and defend them as if their very faith was being attacked. I have friends who take everything this president says at face value without objectively considering what he does. I ll listen to their criticism of Democrats/liberals (the New Orleans Levee board, Kathleen Blanco, Ray Nagin you name it, they all have their faults, and some of them are corrupt are you happy?) without protest, but don t dare level a criticism against this president. Of course, they know not to ask me my opinion of him. moderatelad, FYI, I find your Stay Home with Sojo campaign offensive. There are those of us (Democrats/liberals) who have committed our lives to serving Christ and do anything but stay home. I understand that your frustration is with inaction in the face of gross injustice, and I share your passion in that respect. I do not consider myself a pacifist. I agree with the Catholic Church s teaching on military intervention, and believe that in all but rare instances, military action can be avoided. The media only shows us the tip of the iceberg of violence, injustice, poverty, and suffering in the world. I left the U.S. to volunteer in Ethiopia a month after September 11th. I was deeply saddened, frustrated, and angered. What kept me from a sense of hopelessness was my realization that even though I could do very little to change the big picture, but I could work to make life a little better in one small part of it. At the very core of my being, I believe that is why God gave me this life, my vision, my passion, and my skills (although sometimes, I really don t want them!). I m sure that if you and I sat down for a cup of coffee we d find that we have more in common with each other than things with which we disagree. I admire your attention to injustice. Peace!



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neuro_nurse

posted April 17, 2007 at 8:15 pm


moderatelad, Addendum: Regardless of how I feel about bush, I do not want to see him impeached for two reasons: 1) Congress has too much work to do without wasting several months on a trial that would fail to remove him from office. 2) Perhaps most importantly, I never want to hear ‘vice’ removed from Cheney’s title. I’ve tried to show respect for you and others by not generalizing my opinions about Republicans (I’m married to one) to ‘all of you.’ I may disagree with you, kevin s., wolverine, et alia, but you are individuals, not labels, and you don’t completely agree with each other or tow the party line. You are not Donny.



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 8:35 pm


neuro_nurse | 04.17.07 – 2:20 pm | #So – you are the ‘Mattlin and Carville’ of your community. I used to have a family next door to me that was the same. She worked for the RNC at the time she meet her future husband who was a paid senatorial aid to a Dem. from our state. They have one child. I miss them very much and the hours of conversation that he and I had on the decks of our homes. Blessing on you – Later – .



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 8:53 pm


neuro_nurse | 04.17.07 – 2:12 pm | #Out of respect for you I will never end my posting with SHWS. (I am considering stopping anyway since I believe that I have made my point and whatever) I know that we would have more in common and a desire goal that we could agree on. It would be that path that we would take to achieve that goal that would be different – but not impossible.I believe that my focus on politics has been influenced by living in MN. I have seen the Humpherys, Mondales and Daytons of our state purchase every vote they got. Wellstone was different. liberal – yes…almost off the charts, but someone that you could respect even if you did not agree with him. (I am ashamed as to how our state presented itself at the memorial service – but then again this is what I have put up with in MN – The Dem. Frat House) Here’s to ‘middle ground’ where all are able to walk. Later and respectfully – .



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moderatelad

posted April 17, 2007 at 10:22 pm


neuro_nurse | 04.17.07 – 2:12 pm | #just to clairify – I will never end my postings that are directed at you with SHWS – I might give it all altogether – but can agree to that just now. Later – .



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Sarasotakic

posted April 18, 2007 at 1:24 am


Moderatelad: But when you tell them what it will cost them and others to fix the situation – not too many would be willing to get dirty. They will talk about what needs to be done – how it could be done – how they will raise the money – but most of them will just take. Your unfair generalizations and characterizations reveal where you are coming from Moderatelad. All because you do not agree with SOJO ideology you feel you can impugn their character. Thank you for stating it so clearly.



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moderatelad

posted April 18, 2007 at 4:10 am


Sarasotakic | 04.17.07 – 7:29 pm | #I am willing to look at anything from a different perspective – but the only perspective that I have seen with those who write for Sojo is to hang the conservatives and hail the liberals. In a worship service in the national cathedal they are totally at ease in publically blasting the Pres. The hatred expressed against this Pres is interesting – Sojo still feels that the 2000 election was stolen – and they are still wearing their “I believe Anita Hill” buttons. I think I am more trying to keep the balance as well as being moderate. Whatever Later – .



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Payshun

posted April 18, 2007 at 6:04 pm


Too bad you are not moderate by anything but your definition. If moderate means conservative then I agree you are moderate. p



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Sarasotakid

posted April 18, 2007 at 6:06 pm


Sojo still feels that the 2000 election was stolen – Moderatelad Uh yeah- because it was stolen.



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neuro_nurse

posted April 18, 2007 at 6:20 pm


I used to work with a guy who had gone to school in Belgium. He told me that during a lecture, one of his professors said, In the United States there are only two parties, the conservative party, and the very conservative party.moderatelad, “I will never end my postings that are directed at you with SHWS” That’s true. Minnesota I guess you won t be voting for Al Franken. When I was in New Orleans back in 2000 I had classmates from MN who told me they had walked across the Mississippi River. On my way back to Seattle I drove up to Lake Itasca.



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moderatelad

posted April 18, 2007 at 7:01 pm


Sarasotakid | 04.18.07 – 12:11 pm | # Uh yeah- because it was stolen. Any proof that would stand up in a court of law. Don’t think so.Later – .



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moderatelad

posted April 18, 2007 at 7:06 pm


neuro_nurse | 04.18.07 – 12:25 pm | #Lake Itasca. Beautiful area of the state. I am praying that Al will not be a canidate. I see the only thing he speaks well about is how he hates republicians. His radio show was a failure, his book sales were lukewarm. We need someone that knows MN and will represent us well. Al can’t. (I did vote for HH Humphery Sr – because the republican was an Al F. of that day) Later – .



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Sarasotakid

posted April 18, 2007 at 10:15 pm


Uh yeah- because it was stolen. Sarasotakid Any proof that would stand up in a court of law. Don’t think so. Moderatelad Actually as a duly licensed attorney, I believe that if a case were brought about voting impoprieties in the State of Florida, it would stand up in a court of law. Even if it would not, that does not mean that it didn’t happen. You have to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt in a criminal proceeding.”I think I am more trying to keep the balance as well as being moderate.” Moderatelad If you believe that, I have a bridge for sale in Brooklyn. Your decrying the excesses of the liberals and excusing the abuses of the right, demonstrate that you are anything but moderate.Peace.



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moderatelad

posted April 18, 2007 at 10:30 pm


Sarasotakid | 04.18.07 – 4:20 pm | #gotta love that ‘reasonable doubt’ until it bites you in the backside – ouch. The Supreme Court voted 8 to 1 that the whole state of FL needed to be recounted – that was the first vote. They did the recount on all ballots cast and absentee. The recount still gave Bush the state by a small margin. The SC then voted 5 to 4 to close the recount and validate the vote. The FL Supreme Court tride to change the rules/law midstream – that you can not do. The State of FL hired a law frim here in MN with ties to the DFL that even Hellen Keller could see. They agreed that the vote needed to be validated as the recount had been done properly.(On a personal note – I believe that the FL challenge had more to do with damaging a Bush Adm. than getting Gore the state. Even I would have been calling for closure based on state law than getting my canidate into office. Voting by nature is extreamly political – so what. It is the will of the people – and the people spoke – even the millitary absentee ballots that Gore wanted thrown out of the recount.) Later – .



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Sarasotakid

posted April 19, 2007 at 11:38 am


Voting by nature is extreamly political – so what. Moderatelad I suspect that with your demonstrated lack of objectivity, you would not be making this statement had the outcome been in Gore’s favor. I realize that the system is an electoral college. But the fact of the matter is Gore did win the popular vote. But again, that doesn’t matter, does it, Moderalad. The ends must always justify the means, “Right?”- At least when it comes to getting Republicans elected. That’s message your glib statement sends to me. “On a personal note – I believe that the FL challenge had more to do with damaging a Bush Adm. than getting Gore the state.” Moderatelad Yeah W has been quite the victim, hasn’t he? He’s just a victim of that widespread left-wing conspiracy. Later



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moderatelad

posted April 19, 2007 at 2:55 pm


Sarasotakid | 04.19.07 – 5:43 am | #Voting by nature is extreamly politicalGuessed you missed this part… Even I would have been calling for closure based on state law Fine – get rid of the Electorial College – just so you understand that by doing that a canidate just has to campain in a few states and just in the large cities in those states to get elected. States like WY, AK, NM, ND & SD and a few others will never have a chance to see a canidate in their state as they will not matter. The ends must always justify the means, “Right?” You must have been reading the history of the DFL party in MN – that is the way they get elected all the time. Last minute unfounded acusations against their oponent that turn out to be false – but the Dem got into office. Putting someone on the ballot after the time to change has expired – etc. etc. etc. The DFL in MN is the definition of The ends must always justify the means You want to read about corruption – look at the state of IL and the Kennedy Nixion election – you can’t think this stuff up as well as the machine down there can taint an election. Or SD where the dead vote for the Dem canidate – that is a cool one. gotta love R.D. Later – .



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I have seen their ways, but I will heal them; I will lead them and repay them with comfort, creating for their mourners the fruit of the lips. Peace, peace, to the far and the near, says the Lord; and I will heal them. But the wicked are like the tossing sea that cannot keep still; its waters toss u

posted 9:35:01am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Daily News Digest (by Duane Shank)
the latest news on Mideast, Iran, Romney-Religious right, Blog action day, Turkey, SCHIP, Iran, Aids-Africa, India, Budget, Brownback-slavery apology, Canada, and selected op-eds. Sign up to receive our daily news summary via e-mail » Blog action day. Thousands of bloggers unite in blitz of green

posted 9:31:25am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »




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