God's Politics

God's Politics


Randy Woodley: Is U.S. Democracy A Failed Experiment?

posted by gp_intern

Pow WowIt’s a question I had to finally face because it has been gnawing at me for years, just below the surface. As a Native American and a student of history, I know of the hypocrisy, the constant sway towards American myth building, the social construction of “the White Man,” in order to maintain power and how many treaties were made by the United States with really no intention of keeping them. I’ve seen the disregard for the poor and the hate exhibited for those who are not mainstream or not from the “right” ethnicity. I’ve seen all this sin, both in its ugly raw grassroots forms and in its heinous sophisticated expressions.

Now it appears the present administration may be gearing up for an Iran assault and I wonder what is next? How many innocent Iranians will die? How many of our sons and daughters will have to die for someone’s political agenda? When will the quest for world domination ever end? History continues to repeat itself. I heard someone say, “if we invade Iran, I’ll move to Canada.” Others are speaking out of frustration and cynicism at what appears to be a growing fascism in the United States. Yet, for Native Americans—this is all yesterday’s news…

You may wonder why Native Americans fly the U.S. flag at our Pow Wows. Why do we have the highest rate of service in the U.S. military than any other group? Why despite continued mistreatment, do we remain citizens? While I can’t answer for all Native Americans, I believe I can safely say that it is not because we did not recognize the fascism, the attempted genocide, the lies, and the hypocrisy. Given our history with the U.S., these are very appropriate words to describe the government’s relationship with us. We have never held our eyes closed to the truth.

In some ways Native Americans comprise some of the best citizenry in America because we know the most vile underside of America personally. We benefit the least from America’s accomplishments and we still hold a glimmer of hope that the United States will one day live up to its own goal of being a true democracy. It has even happened in history on several occasions. Perhaps it can happen again. One thing is certain, fascism will not turn itself around willingly. The intoxication of power for those who lead such a regime will not simply abandon their addiction.

I hope that once we, as a nation, get over the shock of the American Myth being shattered, we can see more clearly that something else must happen to allow us to call on our “better angels.” Apparently our university students are not going to be the influence for peace like they were during the Vietnam era. And, even if they were, much of the media has opted out of protest coverage. The politicians are obviously unable to buck the system in the halls of power. The legal system is slowly being purged and gilded. The church is quietly acquiescent in regard to the affairs of the state. So, shall we just lay down and die? Become total cynics? Bury our heads in the sand? Join the rhetoric of those in power? Are there other options?

Without sounding trite, I am actually wondering what Jesus would do. Whatever it is that Jesus would do—it will take you for him to do it. I look forward to hearing from you.

Randy WoodleyRev. Randy Woodley is a Keetoowah Cherokee Indian teacher, lecturer, poet, activist, pastor and the author of Living in Color: Embracing God’s Passion for Ethnic Diversity (InterVarsity Press). http://www.eagleswingsministry.com/



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Payshun

posted March 1, 2007 at 5:40 pm


Can I please stand with you in this? As a blackman I just have to say thank you for this post. It was honest, courageous and powerful. Thank you for having the courage to write this and please write more. p



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Mark Sherman

posted March 1, 2007 at 7:05 pm


Thank you for the article I am afraid that the truth is that we the people never had a democracy in spite of all the propaganda we’ve been filled with over the centuries. A book worth reading is Howard Zinn s – A People s History of the United States. Worse, in my opinion, what little representative democracy we have had from time to time has now been purchased without shame.



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kevin s.

posted March 1, 2007 at 7:29 pm


Democracy is a system that works relatively well for a fallen race. Attempts to perfect government have failed miserably.



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Julie

posted March 1, 2007 at 8:24 pm


I have not had the privilege of having known any Native Americans personally, but I heard one speak at my church and was truly humbled by this man’s commitment to justice for all and limited government. His understanding of the history of this country far exceeded that of the average American’s.Interestingly, our system of government was not intended to be a democracy, because in a pure democracy, the majority rules and can therefore legislate away the rights of the minority. All too often, however, even our Republican system of government has failed in protecting the rights of minorities (as seen in the institution of slavery, in which members of the majority legally enslaved the minority). As Kevin pointed out, no earthly government could ever be perfect, yet this should not stop us from trying to improve ours.



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Mark P

posted March 1, 2007 at 8:46 pm


Hey, the Founders hated democracy, so that’s cool with me :) Democracy, rule of the mob, and Vox Populi Rex were largely innovations of the Jacksonian era.



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Will H.

posted March 1, 2007 at 9:51 pm


Thanks for the post. I have to agree with you on your main points. I think one thing that we could do as a nation would be to recognize our past for what it really is. Like you say we have subjugated numerous groups for monetary gain and we have always tried to put a spin on our actions if not to make them seem benign, and if not benign then completely altruistic. So I think it would be helpful to just be honest for once, and to do so without prefacing our comments with, “well if we hadn’t done it then someone else would have!” That would be helpful.



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Cornet Joyce

posted March 1, 2007 at 9:57 pm


If the writer imagines that this vast empire is a “democracy,” it isn’t Democracy that failed: it was the educational system.



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Mark P

posted March 1, 2007 at 11:06 pm


Eh, everyone calls it a democracy now, so I don’t fault him for going with the flow… and considering the way we tend to be so much in favor of mob majority rule, it’s kind of true…. a representive mobocracy, sure… but certainly not a Constitutional Republic anymore — if it ever really was.



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Kevin K (yet another Kevin)

posted March 1, 2007 at 11:20 pm


I believe that, as Christians and the Church, we have failed our namesake in not living our faith, which stands in contrast to all governments except the Kingdom of God. America stands at a crossroads. It will not always be the World’s only superpower. Our consumer-driven culture will, in all likelihood, be our undoing over the decades ahead, if we don’t alter course soon…very soon! Randy’s excellent article demonstrates that we are not exempt from the scrutiny of history nor exempted from the possibility of our own demise. Wendell Berry has written clearly about this in his book, Sex, Freedom & Community: Eight Essays. We have mortgaged our children’s future for our the selfish desires over the past century and we are reaping what we have sown. We need, corporately, to face up to our sins (our “Society of Death” in the words of Walter Brueggeman), and ask for forgiveness and repent. Time is getting uncomforably short.



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w joseph

posted March 1, 2007 at 11:25 pm


Thanks Randy, I’m interested in a process called Restorative Justice where the questions asked when a crime/geonocide for instance/ has been committed are– *what has been the harm done, to the victims, the community, and the offenders *what will it take to repair the harm A great resource for some restorative justice publications: http://www.livingjusticepress.org/ Have you or others heard of or participated in a sort of truth and reconciliation process here in our land, similar to the ones conducted in several African countries and El Salvador? I know there is or was the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission. http://gtrc.blogspot.com/



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Kevin K (yet another Kevin)

posted March 2, 2007 at 12:05 am


Thank you for the Living Justice link. Great work going on there.



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Randy G

posted March 2, 2007 at 2:11 am


Randy, Your last questions is really the best question you ask in the whole of your article. What would Jesus do. There is really no need to ask that question unless you have never read any of the Gospels or any of Paul’s writings etc. Martin Luther King did just what Jesus would have done he brought people together, he showed them how love really worked and he made them stop and think about what it was they were doing. He did not run down the system that allowed him the freedoms to do what needed to be done. He just did it! I agree with you on the treatment of Native Americans it was and is a tragedy. But Jesus’s words from the cross are ones we all really need to ponder…”forgive them father for they know not what they do.” As I remember the story he was speaking to the religious/political leaders of the day and to the Romans who had just hung him on a tree. Can we ever learn to forgive, is that not one of the central theme’s of the gospels? I know why the Native Americans serve and fly the flag etc. Do you? Foregiveness is an amzaing thing when we apply it in out lives.



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Mark P

posted March 2, 2007 at 2:31 am


Randy and Randy, The way we treat the Native American populations was and is a shameful blight (alongside slavery as the worst) on the American Heritage. I say IS and mean it. Being from Tucson, Arizona (though I now live in Michigan), I’ve spent some time on the reservations, particular the Tohono O’dham reservation in southern Arizona. It’s a tragedy; we have destroyed a community and continue to do so in the most tragic way…



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Paul

posted March 2, 2007 at 3:20 am


w joseph, You might want to have a look at Analise Acorn’s “Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice”. This book is not without it’s flaws, but it introduces a number of the basic problems with the current “restorative justice” fad. A basic problem with many formulations of “restorative justice” is that they are incoherant. Justice at its base, is that which we have the right to expect. Mercy, on the other hand is that which we do not have the right to expect, but which may be granted in appropriate circumstances. (see Jeffrie G. Murphy “Getting Even: Forgiveness and it’s limits”) By trying to conflate both, “restorative justice” ends up destroying both justice and mercy. Another serious problem with “restorative justice” is the potential for manipulation and revictimization of the victim. As I understand it, we are told to “do justice, and love mercy…” and we do that best when we keep them distinct. cheers, Paul



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Paul

posted March 2, 2007 at 4:17 am


p.s. Another book you might want to look at is: “Burying the Past: Making Peace and Doing Justice After Civil Conflict” Edited by Nigel Biggar. (get the second and improved edition) cheers, Paul



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empyrius

posted March 2, 2007 at 4:37 am


Democracy? Here in America? This is a warmongering corpotocracy that cares not for their fellow man, pretty good for a nation supposedly founded upon christian sentiment . . . Apparently the Christians of this nation think that by Christ dying for our sins that gives us license to sin vigorously! Or else they have come under the spell of people who seek to practice the 613 mitzvot, or at lest the ones that are economically beneficial. Time to rise up Americans and practice our God-given right to rebel such as this nation’s founding fathers did! Peace



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Mike Hayes

posted March 2, 2007 at 6:36 am


The historical novel series by archeologists W. Michael and Kathleen Gear that started with “People of the Wolf” provides some interesting insights to how native americans might have lived centuries ago, for different parts of the US and at different times. It provides easy reading and speculation about beliefs, habitations, migrations, hunting and gathering practices, and so on. One of the later books in the series talks about the evidence that remains of some peoples apparently exhibit physical characteristics of Europeans, alongside those who were Asian. Maybe Vikings arrived earlier than previously thought. http://www.gear-gear.com/people_of_the_wolf.htm might convince you to read one of these… and perhaps then read more…



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Bill Peltz

posted March 2, 2007 at 8:48 am


“Whatever it is that Jesus would do it will take you for him to do it” — that’s the key line. Christians still need to be constantly reminded about what Body-of-Christ language means. In contrast to Randy G., I don’t think the answer’s obvious. It’s fine to cite the Gospel, and MLK, Jr. as an example of working in accordance with the Gospel, but what’s difficult is to find the way, in the present circumstances, to do as he did — and many of us did — in his day. Having lived and worked on a reservation, as has one of my sons, and having worked in the Deep South in the civil rights movement in the 60s and early 70s, it’s no shock to me that the American Myth is shattering. But we’ve come so far along the road to a US form of fascism that dissidence and Christian counter-cultural resistance is harder to organize and sustain in these days than it was when we were using one part of the established system (the Federal courts) to attack the explicitly unconstitutional Jim Crow part of the system. What to do, Randy? If we’re to be faithful we can’t, of course, just quit. I think we have to concentrate our work on what Bob Edgar calls “Middle Church” — bringing to the “moderate middle” all those issues and values which are actually pretty mainstream but which the religious right calls “leftist”. And I think it’s extremely important to spread a message of anti-corporatism. If there’s one structure — or power or principality — that characterizes our present disorder, it’s the business corporation: immortal (both conceptually and for all practical purposes), driven solely by avarice, and based on unaccountability and institutionalized irresponsibility (since you can’t sue stockholders for corporate misdeeds). Along those lines, I’m involved with a Labor-Religion coalition and with a multi-congregation-based community organizing group which works on local and state issues in concert with similar groups in other cities. (Google the Gamaliel Foundation.) It’s not easy work. There’s much resistance within congregations. The congregation I belong to hasn’t yet joined the groups I’m working with. Joining, as I also do, with like-minded activists, religious and other, in the usual kinds of peace and justice and interfaith work is helpful and sustaining. But speaking as a life-long generic leftist, it seems to me that Middle Church is our key mission field.



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dracula68

posted March 2, 2007 at 9:29 am


Oh, come on now. So far, all these posts have been from whiners. Mr Wallis, since you bring up Iran and the possibility of war, I would think you would be first in line to support it. You want to know oppression, fascism (a term you toss around and yet know nothing about), go live there and try to publish your column. In a “fascism”, you would have been shot for publishing this. And we would have been jailed for reading it.You live in the freest, most productive, most democratic, most free thinking country in the world. You’re free to bellyache, free to complain, free to vote every four years or two years. Yes, the U.S. was bullying 150 years ago. Here’s the word on that IT WAS 150 YEARS AGO: GET OVER IT! Chrissakes, I’m Polish and if I bellyached and whined every time I thought of a nation that oppressed my ancestors I’d never figure out how to screw in a light bulb. Since you seem to know this deep and profound oppression so very well (you really don’t, but I’m pretending you do just for the sake of argument), I would think you would support every effort being made to overthrow it, eradicate it, topple it. You should try reading textbooks on what is happening to real people today in Iran/Iraq/everywhere else at the hands of the governments the U.S. stands opposed to. Bet you won’t do that.



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Corky

posted March 2, 2007 at 11:57 am


A great post from a great person. I always wondered if Native Americans were the influence for peace in the 60′s that I remember them being, how can they be so patriotic in their pow-wow traditions. I think I understand better now.



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chuck

posted March 2, 2007 at 6:17 pm


Brilliant idea. Get rid of the idea of democracy and the writer will really learn what oppression is. Remember, he wrote his piece in the full expectation not being taken off in the middle of the night to be shot.



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Betsy

posted March 2, 2007 at 8:38 pm


Fantastic piece, thank you for writing. I am reminded that some of what was used in formulating our government came from Native Americans. Representative government is at least partly a Native American invention. Admittedly representative government isn’t working all that well in the USA at the moment. My faith leads me to believe that we all need to work, in various ways, to make it work better. Jim Crow is dead, we are trying to make progress on how we treat African Americans. So things can change. They may not be good enough, they may not be changing fasting enough, but we can change. Blessed be & thank you, Rev. Woodley



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HARRIS

posted March 2, 2007 at 8:56 pm


Fighting Principalities & Powers is always a daunting thing. The mistake is to jump into the barrel with these powers, to imagine that all that is needed is a bigger power to off set their malevolent use. Look at Elijah: doesn’t work that way. Actually there is a fair amount in the Indian experience that might be instructive. Here, borrowing some work by James McClurken on the treaty negotiating strategies of the Odawa:Out-powered, they nonetheless engaged the principalities of the time with a series of strategies. They were wise enough to know the aim of power, and so when invited to look potential reservations west of the Mississippi — the lands their kinsman the Potawatomi had been sent to — they instead sent their “middle management” , those without negotiation authority. When summoned to sign the treaty, they nonetheless, drew out the negotiations. They inserted clauses that protected their rights to hunting, and most importantly their right to education. All this from a position of “weakness.” Of course they were weak. What kept them strong through the 19th C was their intact community. It was only the mission school movement (Randy hit on this earlier) that really shattered them in Michigan. So what do we learn? Be wise as serpents, gentle as doves for a start. Build faithful communities. And for those of us (unlike the Indians) given real power — we need discussions that include those in power from our communities. We need to keep expanding the circle to include our nominal opponents. But that path is a spiritual path — what political person in his or her right mind includes the enemy? What we are at war with is not a political party but a Spirit of despair, of authoritarianism, a spirit that crushes spirits. What defeats us is when we abandon hope. So my advice: Build communities. Act. Speak.(btw, the type of healing that can take place can also be found in a really intriguing book on reconciliation between the Iroquois and the Huron, The Renewed, the Destroyed and the Remade, 2004, Michigan State University Press)



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Eric

posted March 2, 2007 at 9:07 pm


Fascism? Randy, we all know American Indians were treated horribly by the U.S. government, but this is not a fascist country. It never was and isn’t now. If this were a fascist country all those that decent from the government line would have been purged or at least live in fear. But no, they’re walking freely among us with no fears in the world. Yes, horrible wrongs have been committed by the government and individuals in the country, but it isn’t fascist. Other than past abuses, I’m not sure what you’re even railing against in this blog post. What would Jesus do about what?



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Eric

posted March 2, 2007 at 9:09 pm


Oops…that should have been “dissent” not “decent” in my comment above.



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Donny

posted March 2, 2007 at 10:42 pm


Give me a break. Indians or, native americans were anything but monks.Why not tell the stories of tribe slaughtering tribe? Or better yet, tell the story of white man casino’s all over “Indian Land.”



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Donny

posted March 2, 2007 at 10:43 pm


BTW, the whole piece is just anti-white racism. “My people” didn’t do a thing to Indians or blacks. yet, i have to suffer the insults from both races.



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moderatelad

posted March 3, 2007 at 1:53 am


Donny | 03.02.07 – 5:48 pm | #Ditto that Donny.As a family that came in a little late to the party – we sure get hung with the mistakes of others that are no relation to us.Many of the tribes in my state have become very rich over the past few decades – put they give or care nothing other native americans in the state.Maybe we should get the UN involved? Later – .



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Lisa

posted March 4, 2007 at 4:26 am


First thank you for the article, this will be the third one I will be using as a current event in my history classes. The only thing I can think of right now is A NATIONWIDE IF NOT WORLDWIDE BOYCOTT OF GASOLINE, sell all our stock in any company connected to defense, refuse to buy things from places that do not meet human rights standards! Let’s get out our bikes, and put our LIVES were our mouths are! I said myself, that I was moving to Canada if they invade Iran, but my students need me to tell them the truth. We know the way…John the Baptist, Jesus, Francis of Assisi, Gandhi, Dr. King and so many others have already showed us the way. Time to start walking…….. If you haven’t seen BOYCOTT, you need to.



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kevin s.

posted March 4, 2007 at 4:28 am


Lisa, Do you boycott gasoline?



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Jared

posted March 4, 2007 at 2:51 pm


A quick comment for Lisa, To say your proposal for a nationwide (or worldwide) boycott of gasoline is “unreasonable” would be an understatement. I dislike oil companies as much as the next fellow, but it’s not something we the people have any control over. America is a free market economy with very few (too few, in my opinion) governmental restrictions on large businesses. Back to the subject, As a White person of Slavic descent, I am tired of being rebuked for atrocities MY ancestors did not even commit, rather things that people of my color did living in another part of the world. It’s simply not right; in fact, it’s quite racist. What American Indians went through several hundred years ago at the hands of the Europeans was horrific — no doubt about it. But what do you want from us, honestly? I applaud the American Indians. They have suffered greatly at the hands of others, as well as, their own, yet most are not bitter or vengeful like other minority groups with a history of persecution. Concerning the state of Iran, Why is America the root of all evil for some people? Yes, I believe we should certainly stand out as a compassionate nation, but it appears that many on the left choose to ignore oppression far greater in other (particularly Islamic) nations. Of course we are obliged to make the United States the best place we can, but I think some liberals are too harshly critical of this country. We ARE a great nation, and we DO have problems that need fixing; but to accuse our government of picking on poor, sweet, little, innocent Iran is absurd. I’m afraid some left-wing pundits are in desperate need of a crash course in Middle East History. On a side note, I see myself as a moderate Christian; I share views with both conservative and progressive believers. My Biblical convictions are relatively orthodox (raised Pentecostal but identify with Methodism), and I do believe in a doctrine of social justice (my economic views are semi-socialist). One thing I do not understand is why Christians left or right of center see each other more as political enemies than brothers and sisters in God’s covenant. I understand we disagree on certain issues: matters of American policy, as well as, theology. But can’t we, for the sake of the secular world, at least ACT like we are a united body of believers? Let us consider first our allegiance to Christ and His kingdom and then allow our political ideology to take shape.



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Mark P

posted March 4, 2007 at 7:28 pm


“Let us consider first our allegiance to Christ and His kingdom and then allow our political ideology to take shape.” Amen. Lisa, I’m scared that you are involved in education.



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Eric

posted March 5, 2007 at 7:58 pm


Lisa, Seriously, are you really boycotting oil companies? You do realize that oil is used to make a lot more products than gasoline don’t you? Let’s see…paint, ink, all sorts of lubricating oils, food, food packaging, plastics, matches, petroleum jelly, medicines, shampoo, contact lenses, building materials, synthetic rubber (so we don’t have to cut down more trees), fertilizers, household cleaners, disinfectants that save millions of lives a year, any of the plastic on your bike, and yes, the asphalt on which you ride your bike. If you’re able to boycott all of these things I’ll be very impressed.



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Payshun

posted March 5, 2007 at 8:22 pm


Jared said: Back to the subject, As a White person of Slavic descent, I am tired of being rebuked for atrocities MY ancestors did not even commit, rather things that people of my color did living in another part of the world. It’s simply not right; in fact, it’s quite racist. What American Indians went through several hundred years ago at the hands of the Europeans was horrific — no doubt about it. But what do you want from us, honestly? I applaud the American Indians. They have suffered greatly at the hands of others, as well as, their own, yet most are not bitter or vengeful like other minority groups with a history of persecution. Me: You would not be talking about black folks would you? p



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Joseph T

posted March 6, 2007 at 5:57 am


Randy I deeply respect the sense of honesty I feel in your writing. You allow for the honest confusion we all feel in the crosscurrents of power, lies, truth and hope.Only thing I did wrong, stay in the wilderness too long Keep your eyes on the prize, hold on. Only thing I done right was the day I started to fight keep your eyes on the prize , hold on.Hold on brother.



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Jared

posted March 19, 2007 at 10:05 am


Payshun said: “You would not be talking about black folks would you?” I was referring to a large portion of the American black minority, yes.



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Daniel Lowe

posted March 29, 2007 at 3:15 am


For those wondering about their ancestry not having committed atrocities against Native Americans, I would like to say that you probably don’t have much to worry about. However, as citizens of a country where those atrocities continue to occur today, I would say that your voice, your vote, your phone call (to the powers that be), your letter (to the powers that be), any of these can work toward some sort of restorative justice for the horrible things that continue to happen, today, against Native Americans. If you think that the oppression of Native Americans was a thing of the past, I recommend thinking again.



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Tasiyagnunpa DuBray

posted June 2, 2007 at 11:06 pm


Daniel is quite correct. The crap is till hitting the fan, and people of all backgrounds would do well to stop throwing it in the air. Good article, Randy.



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Julie

posted October 20, 2007 at 11:42 pm


As a person of Native and Caucasian descent who wasn’t raised as Native, I was under the impression that we had to “move on” and “get over it.” However, I have felt the “call” to return to my Native heritage (and yes, I am a Born-again Christian.) I have been reading about my Cherokee history from someone who lived among them at the turn of the century, and it is astonishing how it has changed my perspective. Racism happens in ways you cannot catch at first glance, the little things. And yes, though we do have a free country now, there are things that our government is doing to erode these freedoms. Little things build up over time, and the principles that we built our society upon have evolved into an elitest attitude and avarice. Just to mention, too…..the happiest society from a study done several months ago show that people from Denmark are the happiest in the world. Hmmmmmm….I was always told that we were. It’s going to take Christ to change our attitudes and Humble ourselves since America’s greatest sin in my mind is Pride. Just my own two cents.



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bkjohn

posted January 14, 2014 at 9:34 am


!!! Main reason God face and it tips politics unknown both nation midst burn explosion !!

TODAY NOT ONLY INDIA, BUT US PRESIDENT ENJOY ;

THAT POLITICAL HAPPY AND IT EVIDENCE WHICH STAGE FROM BORN bloody internecine and terror solutions – THIS MODERN WORLD REAL WAY US PRESIDENT HIS LIFE CRYING TIME UNLIMITED !!!!
NATION TOUCH PAST TOUGH QUESTION ANSWER HIGH SECURITY AND RESTRICT INSIDE FROM OPENED !!!!! EVERY WHERE AMERICAN FRONT RISE-TERROR BY THE FEAR SOLUTION NON-VIOLENT ACHIEVEMENT . BUT 1993 USA STAND WHERE AND WHICH POSITION – THERE FROM TURN FIRE MIDST IT BIG WOUND BY 2011 END REACH NEAR DEATH THREATEN AND CHALLENGES ENCOUNTER ROOT IT IS VERY TOUGH WRATH ENVIRONMENT IN WHITE HOUSE INSIDE ALSO . AT THE TIME ONE DAY BEFORE FINISHING [VACATE]
ENCOUNTER !!! Main reason real truth latent by dead end making danger wrath adverse !!

But gulf life pledge front and back cruel threaten midst God face and it hidden secrecy expose by India burn solution and improve 1993 from difference understand –That point from US President Obama awake his Administration minimum capacity 2011 end !!!!!!!!!!

That crucified tough test threaten challenges midst life fall by today top difference up to political rival leadership midst improvement[kissed each other] . THE PAST FROM UNLIMITED SECURITY PROBLEMS AND IT BONDAGE RESTRICT OVERTAKE, THAT EVIDENCE MOTIVATION BY REALITY ORIGIN VALUE NOW SAW. DIFFERENT FIELD LIKE NATION SECURITY, HEALTH-WEALTH, EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS, LAW AND BUSINESS, ENVIRONMENT IMPROVE ITS ENHANCE GRAPH US PRESIDENT OBAMA ; SECOND WIN LEADERSHIP BY MANIFESTATION RUNNING !!!!

Connection “ which none of the prince of this world knew : for had they known it, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory”. But as it is written, Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man; God a mystery , even hidden . Top difference received , not the spirit of world, but the spirit of God; that we might know the thing that are freely given to us of God !!!

Past from top difference -Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble; Every man’s works shall be made manifest: For the day shall declare it, because it shall be reveled by fire; and the fire shall try every man’s work of what sort it is.
If any man’s work abide which he hath built there upon, he shall receive a reward . If any man’s work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss: but he himself shall be saved ; yet so as by fire !!
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Rickey

posted July 21, 2014 at 9:33 pm


Wow! In the end I got a weblog from where I can genuinely obtain helpful data concerning my study and knowledge.



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Audio: Jim Wallis on "Value Voters" on The Tavis Smiley Show
Last week Jim was on The Tavis Smiley Show and talked about how the changing political landscape will affect the upcoming '08 election. Jim and Ken Blackwell, former Ohio secretary of state, debated and discussed both the impact of "value voters" on the election and what those values entail. + Down

posted 10:11:56am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Verse of the Day: 'peace to the far and the near'
I have seen their ways, but I will heal them; I will lead them and repay them with comfort, creating for their mourners the fruit of the lips. Peace, peace, to the far and the near, says the Lord; and I will heal them. But the wicked are like the tossing sea that cannot keep still; its waters toss u

posted 9:35:01am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Daily News Digest (by Duane Shank)
the latest news on Mideast, Iran, Romney-Religious right, Blog action day, Turkey, SCHIP, Iran, Aids-Africa, India, Budget, Brownback-slavery apology, Canada, and selected op-eds. Sign up to receive our daily news summary via e-mail » Blog action day. Thousands of bloggers unite in blitz of green

posted 9:31:25am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »




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