God's Politics

God's Politics


Elizabeth Palmberg: Sick of Corporate Trade

posted by gp_intern

Who do you think should give nuts-and-bolts advice to help craft trade agreements that can cut Third World AIDS sufferers’ ability to buy lifesaving generic medicines? a) Pharmaceutical corporations, b) other large corporations, or c) public health advocates, including religious groups.

Trick question! There are no public health advocates on the government-organized group that advises U.S. trade negotiators on medicines – just folks from Pfizer, Monsanto, and other corporate interests (plus one environmental group). That setup – along with the “fast track” system, whereby the executive branch negotiates bad agreements and Congress is limited to a yes-or-no vote on them – are two reasons why recent U.S. trade agreements like CAFTA carve out new entitlements for Big Pharma at the expense of sick people in desperately poor countries. And the health of the poor is just one of the ways in which CAFTA, and similar not-yet-approved pacts with Colombia and other countries, are bad products of a bad process.

Some in Congress are starting to speak out about the problem, but a number of congressional leaders, including Sen. Max Baucus, seem to be suggesting that the soon-to-expire “fast track” can be renewed, and that the disastrous course of the past few years can keep rolling on, with only a few changes.

You can tell Congress that this just isn’t good enough. As a first step, pick up the phone TODAY and tell your representatives about Tuesday’s “Rethinking U.S. Trade Policy for the Common Good,” a briefing put together by an interfaith coalition that cares about the well-being of AIDS sufferers, the environment, and ordinary people in the U.S. and abroad.

(And stay tuned for Sojourners’ May issue on trade justice to learn more about what you can do to help build a better world!)

Elizabeth Palmberg is an Assistant Editor for Sojourners magazine.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(39)
post a comment
kevin s.

posted March 12, 2007 at 6:02 pm


I don’t think patent rights constitute an entitlement. I think the argument would be more pursuasive if it took the opposing viewpoint into account. If pharmaceutical companies can’t turn a profit, they can’t make medicine.



report abuse
 

neuro_nurse

posted March 12, 2007 at 6:21 pm


kevin s., The problem is that the WHO already had approved generic fixed-dose combination (FDC) antiretrovirals that are half the cost of those produced by the U.S. manufacturers. Bush s $15 billion pledge to fund AIDS prevention in Africa came with strings attached the drugs had to be approved by the FDA, which stalled the process of making antiretrovirals available to those who needed them and essentially dictated that for a country to receive funds from the U.S., they would have to buy the drugs from U.S. pharmaceutical companies. Bush s gift undermined the WHO process that would have made antiretrovirals available sooner and at half the cost. Meanwhile, people are dying. There is a great book on the subject, a bit dated, but apparently no less accurate than at the time it was written: The Lords of Poverty by Graham Hancock. http://www.commondreams.org/cgi-bin/print.cgi?file=/headlines04/0518-04.htm http://www.thenation.com/docprint.mhtml?i=20031027&s=klein Peace!



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted March 12, 2007 at 7:08 pm


But in any case where patent rights are extended, people die as a result, to the extent that they could be saved by the drug. This is not a reason not to extend patent rights.



report abuse
 

Mike Hayes

posted March 12, 2007 at 11:46 pm


Elizabeth, Thank you for the link to Interfaith Trade Justice Campaign at http://www.tradejusticeusa.org/iwg/briefingactionalert.htm and the opportunity to contact our various members of the US House on this issue. I’ll copy and paste the message in to an email and modify it to become my personal message, and I hope others will contact their member of congress in whichever way best suits them. Thanks, Elizabeth!



report abuse
 

Mike Hayes

posted March 13, 2007 at 12:12 am


Elizabeth, Here is an abbreviated version of what supporters of the values of “God’s Politics” might start from as an email to members of the US House. Draft follows: I am a constituent.I am asking Representative ______________, or a member of his/her staff to attend tomorrow s Congressional Briefing on Rethinking Trade for the Common Good . I am aware that members of congress have been meeting with the Administration about labor and environmental concerns, but merely addressing these two issues does not address fundamental problems with the U.S. approach. Current alternatives put forth by congress are a continuation of the failed one-size-fits-all model that does not live up to the principles of trade justice.In an age of increasing economic integration and interdependence between the nations and peoples of the world, mounting global inequalities have come into sharp focus.Segments of humanity achieve unprecedented material prosperity, while large numbers of people have become mired in poverty, hunger, and disease. In recent bilateral and regional trade agreements, United States Trade Representatives negotiated rules which restrict access to essential medicines needed for treating such diseases HIV/AIDS, malaria and TB more so than rules at the World Trade Organization.Over 1 million corn farmers were driven off their lands because subsidized U.S. corn flooded the markets. Then some complain about illegal immigration. I hope that Congress will move the debate beyond just domestic concerns, and begin to rethink trade policy in terms of what will do more to promote economic and social well-being for the poor and working families in the U.S. and abroad. I encourage Representative _______________ or a member of his/her staff to attend any or all of tomorrow s sessions on Rethinking Trade for the Common Good.



report abuse
 

Mark P

posted March 13, 2007 at 1:43 am


I am not familiar with this particular issue, so I won’t speak specifically, but in a general sense: Understand, as kevin s said, that profit drives research. Without profit, none of the drugs we have today would exist. And without profit, research and development will stall… so if you want to find “cures” or the like for AIDS, cancer, etc… profit must be a factor, and finding the cure must be profitable. How that plays into this situation I cannot say as I haven’t taken the time to figure it out.



report abuse
 

Mark P

posted March 13, 2007 at 1:44 am


Should read: “finding and manufacturing the cure must be profitable.”



report abuse
 

neuro_nurse

posted March 13, 2007 at 2:49 am


Please see the article in The Nation I referenced above. It says “Africa accounts for roughly 1 percent of the $400 billion pharmaceutical industry’s total sales” – not exactly a source of capital for R&D. Several companies outside the U.S. were already manufacturing *generic* antiretrovirals that had been approved for use by the WHO before Bush s $15 billion pledge. Those drugs cost half as much as the drugs manufactured in the U.S. The problem Bush s Global AIDS Initiative has very little to do with patents. What is being touted as an act of altruism is actually a ploy to put Big Pharma in a position to profit at the expense of desperately ill people in developing countries. The Global AIDS Initiative took business away from the generic drug manufacturers outside the U.S. and stalled the WHO antiretroviral program.



report abuse
 

Mark P

posted March 13, 2007 at 4:06 am


A note: I would also say that the FDA is a nightmare; medicines cost tons more here because of the red tape…



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 13, 2007 at 4:32 am


A note: I would also say that the FDA is a nightmare; medicines cost tons more here because of the red tape… Mark P Do you have backgound studing the FDA?



report abuse
 

Mark P

posted March 13, 2007 at 4:36 am


Yes, I have my Ph.D. in FDA studing. It’s a good job.



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 13, 2007 at 4:58 am


How do so many industry people end up in decision making positions?



report abuse
 

Wolverine

posted March 13, 2007 at 6:01 am


Butch asked: How do so many industry people end up in decision making positions? Same reason ex-basketball players wind up coaching: they understand the game — and what it takes to succeed — better than almost anyone who never played. Wolverine



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 13, 2007 at 6:05 am


and what it takes to succeed — better than almost anyone who never played. Wolverine How is score kept in that game?



report abuse
 

Elmo

posted March 13, 2007 at 6:29 am


neuro_nurse- What is being touted as an act of altruism is actually a ploy to put Big Pharma in a position to profit at the expense of desperately ill people in developing countries. How is it at their expense? It’s US money buying their drugs. It seems to be at our expense. What I see is Bush basically giving away $15 billion in medicine. How is that bad? And there’s a great episode of the West Wing where they try to negotiate these prices. Even a liberal TV show couldn’t come to an agreement. What does that tell you?



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 13, 2007 at 6:47 am


Even a liberal TV show couldn’t come to an agreement. What does that tell you? Elmo Tells me it was fictional characters acting, did you think it was real? Since it is my tax money I would like the government to get the most for my money.



report abuse
 

Donny

posted March 13, 2007 at 2:06 pm


“Help of the poor?” Any of you “Christians” over at Sojournes/Christian Alliance for Progress, ever thought to evangelize these people away from the excessive life (obese poor are ubiquitous in the US), of unwed mathers, unhealthy eating and drug selling, errrr, I mean drug addiction? Ever vocalized disdain for the terms Pimp, Player and Baby Momma/Babby Daddy? How about looking at the truth for a change huh?And then preaching it.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted March 13, 2007 at 5:01 pm


SO, Butch, you want the government to expand aid, and use their status as a governmental entity to infringe upon intellectual property rights? How Chinese.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted March 13, 2007 at 5:02 pm


Butch,Your money pays for WIC and food stamp programs. How do you feel about price controls in the dairy industry?



report abuse
 

neuro_nurse

posted March 13, 2007 at 6:07 pm


What I see is Bush basically giving away $15 billion in medicine. How is that bad? [Bush] handed the top job of his Global AIDS Initiative to a Big Pharma boss, then he broke his $3 billion promise of AIDS relief and now there are concerns that he may sabotage a plan to send cheap drugs to countries ravaged by AIDS.This past August [2003], the World Trade Organization announced a new deal on drug patents that was supposed to give poor countries facing health problems the right to import generic drugs. But the deal seemed unworkable: The United States, at the behest of the pharmaceutical lobby, had successfully pushed for so many conditions that the agreement exploded from a straightforward forty-nine words to a sprawling 3,200-word maze. Countries wanting to import cheap generics must jump through multiple hoops to prove they are truly in need, unable to afford patented drugs and incapable of producing the medicines domestically. Meanwhile, there is no guarantee that there will be a sufficient supply of drugs for them to buy, since the deal also puts up hurdles for countries wanting to export. “A ‘gift’ tightly bound in red tape,” declared a coalition of NGOs, including M decins Sans Fronti res and Third World Network. http://www.thenation.com/doc/20031027/Klein Donny, The article is about people in Africa, not the U.S. “How about looking at the truth for a change huh?” Do you have any first hand experience working with poor people in this country? I do (in this country and in Africa), and I can tell you that the stereotypes and prejudices you voiced are far from the truth. Jesus was criticized by the religious elite for dining with tax collectors and prostitutes. Where are you, Donny?



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 13, 2007 at 8:29 pm


SO, Butch, you want the government to expand aid, and use their status as a governmental entity to infringe upon intellectual property rights? How Chinese. kevin s. Normal Kevin twist, everything has to attack any thought that might cause big business a problem. If the government gives aid then I want the best prices. If that infringes on property rights then it is or should be against the law. If money or aid is given then it may not have strings attached then it may not be subject to our laws. If it has strings attached then they have to be honored. How Republi-Nazi of you. I really like your new attack, call someone Chinese . This could have babies such as Mandarin.



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 13, 2007 at 9:17 pm


Butch, Your money pays for WIC and food stamp programs. How do you feel about price controls in the dairy industry? kevin s. Normal Republi-nazi ploy, throw in internal affairs into a discussion about helping others dieing of aids.



report abuse
 

Don

posted March 14, 2007 at 12:49 am


“hrow in internal affairs into a discussion about helping others dieing [sic] of aids.” You’re right, Butch. I think I can pick up the scent of red herring even from here. But maybe it’s really time to retire the term “Republi-Nazi” once and for all. Peace!



report abuse
 

Mark P

posted March 14, 2007 at 1:04 am


“Normal Kevin twist, everything has to attack any thought that might cause big business a problem.” -I prefer attacking thoughts to ad hominem attacks.



report abuse
 

neuro_nurse

posted March 14, 2007 at 2:12 am


Donny, It s time to slaughter your sacred cow with some truth. Here is some information from the NIH:According to recent National Household Survey data, rates for the use of illicit drugs, nicotine, and alcohol, are highest among American Indians, followed by Whites and Hispanics. Drug use was reported to be lowest among African Americans and Asian Americans. While substance abuse is a problem in all population groups, its social and health consequences are more heavily concentrated among racial and ethnic minority populations, and African Americans in particular. The health consequences of drug use (i.e.HIV/AIDS, lack of treatment access, emergency room visits, and death) disproportionately impact African Americans. Differences in health status within and across racial and ethnic groups have been associated with socioeconomic status (SES), psychosocial factors, quality of and access to health care, health behaviors, cultural and ethnic identity, acculturation, racial discrimination, segregation, and environmental and occupational stresses. Although many of the differences in health outcomes are probably determined by SES, it is not the whole explanation. Researchers want to know the extent to which these disparities are driven by socioeconomic opportunities for racial and ethnic minorities and the extent to which there are pathways independent of SES.http://www.drugabuse.gov/MeetSum/HIVworkshop.html There is a very interesting study that was based on the data from the National Comorbidity Survey (http://www.hcp.med.harvard.edu/ncs/index.php) that you should read: Diala, C. C., Muntaner, C., Walrath, C. (2004) Gender, occupational, and socioeconomic correlates of alcohol and drug abuse among U.S. rural, metropolitan, and urban residents. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0978/is_2_30/ai_n6167177/pg_1 It s rather long, but it contradicts your statements about substance abuse among the poor. Rates of alcohol abuse (which is second only to nicotine abuse in health care costs associated with substance abuse) are higher among people with higher incomes. African Americans have a lower incidence of substance abuse than whites do, and are no more likely than whites to traffic drugs. (I know your statement post was not overtly racist, but I m going to go out on a limb here and say that many people who hold the stereotypes that it seems associate the terms Pimp, Player and Baby Momma/Babby Daddy (sic) with African-Americans)[E]ver thought to evangelize these people away from the excessive life[ ]?Excessive by whose standards? I spent a year volunteering in Ethiopia. I guarantee you, by the standard of most of the people who walk the planet today YOU live an excessive life! I m working on a masters in public health so that I can answer God s call to go back to Africa and work to improve the living standards of some of the poorest of God s children. To someone with my worldview, your grotesque generalization of people who haven t had the advantages and opportunities that you have are extremely offensive. Call me a bleeding-heart liberal if you want to, but when our Lord separates the sheep from the goat, I know where I want to be standing.



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 14, 2007 at 2:30 am


If the thoughts are a lie then attack the hominem.



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 14, 2007 at 3:18 am


ad hominem is the only muslim in Carl Rove’s attack corps.



report abuse
 

Mark P

posted March 14, 2007 at 3:34 am


butch, “If the thoughts are a lie then attack the hominem.” Think about it this way: if you spend half your time attacking the person, you DISTRACT from your attack on the argument and dilute your logical rejection of an idea with a personal attack. If you prove someone’s argument a lie and do so conclusively, everyone will know the person who put forth the argument is a liar. But if you spend half your time calling him a liar, people will lose sight of the firmness of your point. So if you want to make a point, change minds, and have an impact, don’t dilute your arguments and let yourself be distracted. Spend all your resources assaulting the idea, the thought, the argument, and your impact will be doubled.



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 14, 2007 at 4:25 am


Mark P, such well thought out arguments and well stated. Here is my experience, a liar will always lie and take your time, good humor but worse sometimes your mind. Now a well thought out lie well stated can mislead so I point out the lie in my opinion and let others separate the two. The liar acts like a terrorist willing to sneak into the room anyway they can and blow it up. In this case they aim to escape unnoticed, my purpose is to identify them when they walk in and allow the victims to escape, those who don’t leave aren t smart enough anyway. If my methods cause sympathy then the sympathetic weren’t smart enough to get it anyway. If others focus on me then they aren t smart enough to get it either. This isn t Sunday School, we are playing word games with really dangerous people, yes I know you love the game and feel your skill will protect you.Don t make deals with the devil.



report abuse
 

Mark P

posted March 14, 2007 at 6:28 am


“In this case they aim to escape unnoticed, my purpose is to identify them when they walk in and allow the victims to escape, those who don’t leave aren t smart enough anyway.” -The point is that most people will doubt your claim (___ is a liar) until they see it proven in their minds… and if they are convinced by your argument, there was no need to call ___ a liar in the first place because they’ll see it themselves. -Again, they’ll be convinced by an argument, not a claim, and the claim will only detract from the force of your argument. “we are playing word games with really dangerous people, yes I know you love the game and feel your skill will protect you.” -Depending on what you mean by “word games,” I might say that’s a true statement. Words are incredible powerful and meaningful… not to be taken lightly. Muddled language reflects muddled thinking, and using clear words reflects clear thinking. I do get satisfaction from pointing out muddled thought, and maybe that’s a bad thing. But I don’t consider it petty. Words matter. They are not arbitrary ways to get at an idea; they inherently reflect one’s understanding of reality. -In all honesty, I do often enjoy debate. Sometimes I get sick of it, and I hate running round in circles (though I succumb to that at times like most people), but I like debate. -Again, the basic point is that I think your arguments would be MORE powerful and you’d convince MORE people if you wouldn’t water them down by adding in ad hominem, but that’s just me.



report abuse
 

butch

posted March 14, 2007 at 7:13 am


They are not arbitrary ways to get at an idea; they inherently reflect one’s understanding of reality.Or used to create an illusion.



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted March 14, 2007 at 7:32 am


“You’re right, Butch. I think I can pick up the scent of red herring even from here.” Do you have any explanation for this? I pointed out that the governmental infringement on the basic tenets of the free market is a key component of communism. If you want to dig deeper, by all means, do so, but I think it is entirely germane to this conversation.



report abuse
 

Don

posted March 14, 2007 at 12:47 pm


Kevin, the topic at hand is US trade policy and how it affects anti-AIDS drug availability in the third world. I’m not sure what WIC and food stamps (domestic programs) has to do with trade policy or AIDS drugs in Asia and Africa. If you see a connection and want to explain it, go ahead, but I don’t see it.



report abuse
 

Mark P

posted March 14, 2007 at 2:35 pm


A possible connection, Don, would be that IF we are ineffective with domestic poverty relief programs… how can we possibly expect to be successful in Asia and Africa? I would also note that the closest thing to foreign aid (that is, money/other aid to a distinct sovereign state) on US soil is federal aid to Native American reservations… And our precedent there is AWFUL. What we’ve done to the reservations via our federal aid has been a horror, a devestation continuing in our tradition of destroying their people.



report abuse
 

neuro_nurse

posted March 15, 2007 at 12:36 am


Donny, Most adults aged 18 or older with substance dependence or abuse in 2005 were employed either full or part time. Of the 20.2 million adults classified with dependence or abuse, 15.5 million (76.7 percent) were employed. In 2005, among persons aged 12 or older, the rate for substance dependence or abuse was 9.0 percent in large metropolitan counties, 9.9 percent in small metropolitan counties, and 8.2 percent in nonmetropolitan counties. http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/NSDUH/2k5NSDUH/2k5results.htm#Ch7 In 2000, 31 million people, or 11.3 percent of the population lived at or below the official poverty level 1.1 million fewer than in 1999. While the bulk of these individuals were children and adults who did not participate in the labor force, about 6.4 million were classified as the working poor. This was 445,000 fewer than in 1999, continuing a 7-year downtrend. As defined for this report, the working poor are individuals who spent at least 27 weeks in the labor force (working or looking for work), but whose incomes fell below the official poverty level. Of all persons in the labor force for at least 27 weeks, 4.7 percent were classified as working poor in 2000, down 0.4 percentage point from the previous year. http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpswp2000.htm Nearly 13 million American children live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level, which is $20,000 a year for a family of four. The number of children living in poverty increased by more than 11 percent between 2000 and 2005. There are 1.3 million more children living in poverty today than in 2000, despite indications of economic recovery and growth. Nationwide, 18% of children live in families that are officially considered poor (13 million children). 16% of households with children experience food insecurity. http://www.nccp.org/pub_cpt06a.html Approximately 46 million Americans, or 15.7 percent of the population, were without health insurance in 2004 (the latest government data available). In 2004, 27 million workers were uninsured because not all businesses offer health benefits, not all workers qualify for coverage and many employees cannot afford their share of the health insurance premium even when coverage is at their fingertips. Millions of workers don’t have the opportunity to get coverage. A third of firms in the U.S. did not offer coverage in 2004. Nearly two-fifths (38 percent) of all workers are employed in smaller businesses, where less than two-thirds of firms now offer health benefits to their employees. (4)It is estimated that 266,000 companies dropped their health coverage between 2000-2005 and 90 percent of those firms have less than 25 employees. Even if employees are offered coverage on the job, they can’t always afford their portion of the premium. Employee spending for health insurance coverage (employee’s share of family coverage) has increased 143 percent between 2000 and 2005. So let s see, most people with substance abuse problems have jobs, and there isn t much difference in the rates of substance abuse between cities and rural areas. In 2000 there were 31 million people in the U.S. living below the poverty line, nearly 12 million of them were children, and 6.4 million people living below the poverty line were working. (that leaves 13.9 million people living in poverty in the U.S., but these statistics do not distinguish who those non-working poor are, id est, the elderly & disabled) Most people who don t have health care insurance are working. So Donny, it appears as if your idea of who the poor are in this country is significantly different from THE TRUTH.



report abuse
 

neuro_nurse

posted March 15, 2007 at 12:39 am


addendum, the reference for the statistics on health care insurance is http://www.nchc.org/facts/coverage.shtml



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted March 15, 2007 at 7:10 am


“I’m not sure what WIC and food stamps (domestic programs) has to do with trade policy or AIDS drugs in Asia and Africa. ” Butch’s statement was that if America is paying the bills, he wants America to set the prices, that he would get the most for his tax dollars. I drew an analogy between this idea and setting prices on milk on account of WIC and Food Stamp programs. What we do in the name of foreign aid has an impact on industry that reaches beyond foreign aid. We should not use charity as an excuse to impinge upon existing patent rights.



report abuse
 

John Francis

posted March 15, 2007 at 10:08 pm


How can you say that “America is paying the bills”? Which part of “America? I ask because the US part of America currently has a national debt of US$8,842,127,968,387 and a few cents. With a population of just over 301 million each citizen’s share of this is US$29,357. The debt is also increasing by US$2.01 billion per day. If the US is carrying such a fantabulous National Debt where is the money coming from for it to do ANYTHING, let alone do anything for those in great need for whatever reason – health, hunger, war, famine etc. etc. etc. There is such an air of unreality about this debate. Good and great words need to be transformed into deeds. As I write I find myself feeling sick at how cheap these words are, how easy they are to write. I believe it was your President madison who famously said,”The business of America is Business.” Well, if American business, whether at corporate or governmental level or both (more likely) is responsible for that National Debt them they are bankrupt, dismal failures, living in cloud cuckoo land, maintaining a fiction that is almost as large as the planet. So the question again is – where is the money coming from? Who is the USA in debt to? In other words, if the creditors call in the debts who will the USA belong to? Come on people. get REAL.



report abuse
 

Payshun

posted March 16, 2007 at 12:46 am


John, That’s an easy question to answer actually. CHina, future generations and a host of others.p



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting God's Politics. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:14:07am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Why I Work for Immigration Reform (by Patty Kupfer)
When I tell people that I work on immigration reform, they usually laugh or say, "way to pick an easy topic." Everyday it feels like there is more fear, more hate. Raids are picking up in Nevada, California, and New York. A number of senators who supported comprehensive reform only a few months ago

posted 12:30:52pm Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Audio: Jim Wallis on "Value Voters" on The Tavis Smiley Show
Last week Jim was on The Tavis Smiley Show and talked about how the changing political landscape will affect the upcoming '08 election. Jim and Ken Blackwell, former Ohio secretary of state, debated and discussed both the impact of "value voters" on the election and what those values entail. + Down

posted 10:11:56am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Verse of the Day: 'peace to the far and the near'
I have seen their ways, but I will heal them; I will lead them and repay them with comfort, creating for their mourners the fruit of the lips. Peace, peace, to the far and the near, says the Lord; and I will heal them. But the wicked are like the tossing sea that cannot keep still; its waters toss u

posted 9:35:01am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »

Daily News Digest (by Duane Shank)
the latest news on Mideast, Iran, Romney-Religious right, Blog action day, Turkey, SCHIP, Iran, Aids-Africa, India, Budget, Brownback-slavery apology, Canada, and selected op-eds. Sign up to receive our daily news summary via e-mail » Blog action day. Thousands of bloggers unite in blitz of green

posted 9:31:25am Oct. 16, 2007 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.