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Tonight I went to a Yom Kippur break-fast even though the only fasting I’ve done recently is while sleeping. Not being a terribly observant half-Jew, I tend to dip in and out of traditions, mostly as an excuse to spend time with friends and eat good food. Tonight I was invited to an especially lovely evening, and while munching apples, honey and the buttery-est lox from Russ & Daughters, we shared our resolutions for the coming year.

Though we actually never made it to me–we broke into several fascinating tangents that wound off, from Macedonia to Facebook to San Diego–I did have a while to think about it. And I feel grateful for the notion that I can re-make a resolution, because I’m pretty sure I didn’t actually make any in January. Or nothing I actually remember. So, what I thought of as the circle went round was this:

This year I resolve to be a less hospitable hostess to negativity. I tend to let things like sorrow and frustration pool in me, stirring them with my poor-me spoon, sipping them like a kind of nourishing poison. So, this year, when I catch myself doing that, I will do my best to change the thought loop. Because though it may satisfy some part of me that is in the habit of feeling a certain kind of bad, I have a sense that once I stop throwing pity parties I can get some cooler guests–like love, joy, warmth, and inspiration.

That’s it! Jewish or not, do you have any mid-year resolutions? As one woman said tonight to a woman who was concerned about not staying in better touch with old friends: “It’s not too late until you die!” So, it’s not too late too re-commit, re-promise, or come up with something new. A notion well worth resurrecting no matter what any calendar says.

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