For Bible Study Nerds

For Bible Study Nerds


Matthew 4:18-22; The Calling of the First Disciples (Historical Background)

posted by Mike Nappa

Jesus told Simon Peter and Andrew that he would make them “fishers of men.”

The image there was grounded in the fisherman’s trade on the Sea of Galilee. Unlike our modern picture of a single man casting line off a flexible pole to catch a single fish, Jesus’ reference was to “net fishing” that was usually conducted in teams. Galilee fishermen in Jesus’ day typically used three types of nets to catch their prey:

A “cast net” was circular, about 25-feet in diameter, weighted this lead sinkers on the edge. It was tossed over side of a boat where it floated to the bottom like an opened parachute, trapping fish inside.

A “seine net” was long and narrow, with weights on one end and floats on the other. It would hang vertically beside the boat, one end at the surface, and the other deep into the water. Fishermen could then capture entire schools of fish by using ropes to pull the net up into a U-shape.

A “trammel net” was largest, stretching nearly 200 yards. Reinforced by three layers of netting, it was typically spread between two boats on the water. Rowing the boats forward trapped fish in the huge net. When it was full, the fishermen would simply pull up the trammel to harvest their catch.

 Matthew 4:18-22; The Calling of the First Disciples

Works Cited:

[JOB, 127]

 

ΩΩΩ

About: For Bible Study Nerds™

About: Mike Nappa

Copyright © 2014 to present by Nappaland Communications Inc. All Rights Reserved.



Previous Posts

Matthew 5:43-48; Love for Enemies (Theological Commentary)
“He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good,” Jesus said, as recorded in Matthew 5:44-55, “and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.” Theologians point to this statement as evidence of a doctrine called “Common Grace,” or the idea that “God’s love extends even t

posted 12:00:51pm Oct. 01, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 5:43-48; Love for Enemies (Cross-Reference Comparisons)
“You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy…’” This quote from Matthew 5:43 reveals—again—how religious leaders in Jesus time had unwittingly distorted the Mosaic Law they claimed to hold supreme. The distortion was not intentional or arbitrary—scribe

posted 12:00:50pm Sep. 29, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 5:38-42; An Eye for an Eye (Factual Info)
“If anyone wants to sue you and take away your tunic,” Jesus preached in his Sermon on the Mount, “let him have your cloak also.” With all this archaic talk of tunics and cloaks, it’s easy to overlook the devastatingly difficult demand of this little statement. Consider: • In Jesus

posted 12:00:31pm Sep. 26, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 5:38-42; An Eye for an Eye (Cultural Commentary)
Why was Jesus so adamant about mentioning “the right cheek” when he gave his command for followers to “turn the other cheek”? The answer lies in the social norms of that time in ancient Israel. In Western society today, one person spitting on another is a contemptuous, especially offensiv

posted 12:00:30pm Sep. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 5:38-42; An Eye for an Eye (Historical Backgrounds)
The legal for basis for lex talionis (“law of retaliation”) that Jesus referred to in Matthew 5:38 was well established in Jewish history and in the Law of Moses. The “eye for an eye” concept first appeared in Genesis 9:6, just after the Great Flood when God told Noah, “Whoever sheds hu

posted 12:00:29pm Sep. 22, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.