For Bible Study Nerds

For Bible Study Nerds


Matthew 4:1-11; The Temptation of Jesus (Inductive Studies)

posted by Mike Nappa

Did you notice that only Satan worked miracles during the temptation of Christ?

The devil first appeared out of nowhere (Matthew 4:3). Then he miraculously transported Jesus to the highest point of the Jerusalem temple (4:5). Lastly, he transported Jesus to a high mountain and gave him a supernatural vision of “all the kingdoms of the world.”

It’s also interesting to note that God’s miracle-working Messiah, Jesus Christ himself, didn’t perform a single miracle in his defense during this time of temptation. Despite the devil’s repeated insistence, Jesus refused to overrule the laws of nature on his own behalf—even though history has shown he had that power. As one theologian remarked:

“Jesus called upon no power that is not available to any man as he faces temptation. His only weapon was the Scripture, the Sword of the Spirit, and He wielded it within the center of the will of God.”

 Temptation of Christ by By Félix Joseph Barrias

Works Cited:

[ILJ, 57]

 

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