For Bible Study Nerds

For Bible Study Nerds


Matthew 2:19-23; The Return to Nazareth (Historical Backgrounds)

posted by Mike Nappa

Matthew reports that Joseph was afraid to live in Judea under the rule of Herod’s son, Archelaus—and apparently with good reason.

After Herod the Great died, there was a power struggle among his sons over who would inherent his kingdom. Archelaus had first assumed kingship, over the objections of his brothers. Meanwhile, revolutionaries stirred up opposition and threatened to derail Archelaus’ bid to rule. He responded as his father would have, sending in the Roman army and massacring 3,000 people during the Passover holiday. Fresh off that victory, he went with his brother to Rome to make a case for his kingship with the emperor. After much deliberation, Caesar Augustus made a compromise decision. He appointed Archelaus as “ethnarch” over Idumea, Judea, and Samaria, with a promise that he would be made king if he proved worthy. His brother Antipas was installed as “tetrarch” over Galilee and Perea, while Philip was also named tetrarch over other territories in the area.

When Archelaus returned to Judea, history reports that he “ruled both Jews and Samaritans with great brutality.” It was so bad, in fact, that Augustus deposed and banished Archelaus only two years later, around 6 A.D., after both Jews and Samaritans sent a delegation detailing the ethnarch’s cruelty in supposed service to Rome.

Roman Spatha (long sword); Matthew 2:19-23; The Return to Nazareth

Works Cited:

[ZP3, 138]

 

ΩΩΩ

About: For Bible Study Nerds™

About: Mike Nappa

Copyright © 2014 to present by Nappaland Communications Inc. All Rights Reserved.



Previous Posts

Matthew 6:16-18; Fasting (Factual Info)
Jesus’ instruction about fasting assumes that it is a normal part of a life devoted to God…but why fast? Why did (and do) people go without food and/or water as a religious observance? Here are a few reasons from Scripture: • Once a year, as a commemorative action on the Day of Atonement

posted 12:00:58pm Oct. 20, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 6:5-15; Prayer (Word Study)
Forgiveness is a crucial element of The Lord’s Prayer, and it always carries both vertical and horizontal applications. “Forgive us our debts” Jesus said in Matthew 6:12—a vertical, us-to-God appeal. Then he said, “…As we have also forgiven our debtors”—a horizontal, us-to-others com

posted 12:00:57pm Oct. 17, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 6:5-15; Prayer (Rhetorical Influences)
Matthew 6:9-13 is one of the most famous biblical texts of all time. Known as “The Lord’s Prayer,” it records Jesus’ specific instructions for how to pray. It’s important to notice that, immediately before giving this text, Christ warned his followers to avoid “babbling like pagans”

posted 12:00:56pm Oct. 15, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 6:5-15; Prayer (Cultural Commentary)
If Jesus’ description of flamboyant, hypocritical praying sounds like grand theatre, that’s because it probably was. “And when you pray,” Jesus said in Matthew 6:5, “do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by m

posted 12:00:55pm Oct. 13, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 6:1-4; Giving to the Needy (Theological Commentary)
“Your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.” Jesus’ comment, recorded in Matthew 6:4, is an affirmation of the related ideas that God is both everywhere and all-knowing. Theologians call these concepts “omnipresence” (or “immanence”) and “omniscience.” So wha

posted 12:00:54pm Oct. 10, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.