For Bible Study Nerds

For Bible Study Nerds


Matthew 2:1-12; The Visit of the Magi (Symbolism)

posted by Mike Nappa

The Magi gave to baby Jesus gifts of gold, incense, and myrrh. Those gifts fulfilled a prophecy found in Isaiah 60:6, and also communicated symbolic meaning.

Gold in the ancient Middle East was associated with “noble purposes,” as well as “immense worth and indestructibility.” Incense was an element of worship, and “from the revelations of both Isaiah and John, we understand that incense signals the everlasting worship of Yahweh.” Frankincense specifically was used in an altar sacrifice at the temple. Finally, myrrh was a rare, aromatic substance used to perfume clothing and dead bodies during the embalming process. Taken together, these three gifts can symbolize Jesus’ place as the eternal King, the divine Messiah, and our suffering Savior.

Matthew 2:1-12

Works Cited:

[DBI, 341, 419; HBD, 322, 672]

 

ΩΩΩ

About: For Bible Study Nerds™

About: Mike Nappa

Copyright © 2014 to present by Nappaland Communications Inc. All Rights Reserved.



Previous Posts

Matthew 7:13-14; The Narrow and Wide Gates (Historical Backgrounds)
When we read about Jesus contrasting “wide” and “narrow” gates in Matthew 7:13-14, the modern assumption is to picture two separate gates at the end of separate roads. Historically speaking, that image is probably incorrect. In Jesus’ time, city gates were large and multi-layered. The b

posted 12:00:39pm Nov. 28, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 7:13-14; The Narrow and Wide Gates (Geographical Backgrounds)
“Broad is the road that leads to destruction,” Jesus said near the end of his Sermon on the Mount. As with other references in this sermon, Jesus likely used a literal, visual cue as a symbolic example when he made this statement. In a general sense, most roads in ancient Palestine were commo

posted 12:00:38pm Nov. 26, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 7:13-14; The Narrow and Wide Gates (Word Study)
Here’s a quick overview of a few keywords from Matthew 7:-13-14, along with their brief meanings in the original Greek text: • Enter (eisérchomai): To go or come into. Also, to go about one’s daily life. • Narrow (stenós): This is a Greek term that means both “narrow” and “straight

posted 12:00:36pm Nov. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 7:7-12; Ask, Seek, Knock (Literary Influences)
Found where it in Matthew 7:12, the “Golden Rule” seems an awkward contextual placement. In modern Bibles, it’s lumped in with Matthew 7:7-11, appearing as the final sentence in this section of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. This is particularly perplexing because verse 12 in the NIV begins wit

posted 12:00:54pm Nov. 21, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 7:7-12; Ask, Seek, Knock (Cultural Commentary)
Jesus frequently pointed to God’s place as our Father to emphasize the idea that God cares for us—but that imagery meant something different to his first-century hearers than it does to our so-called “progressive” 21st-century culture. In today’s American culture, the father is importan

posted 12:00:53pm Nov. 19, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.