Flower Mandalas

Flower Mandalas

Flower Mandala: Opening

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Pink Dahlia I
Opening:
n.

  1. The act or an instance of becoming open or being made to open.
  2. An open space serving as a passage or gap.
  3. A breach or aperture.
  4. A clearing in the woods.
  5. The first part or stage, as of a book.
  6. The first performance: the opening of a play.
  7. A formal commencement of operation: attended the opening of the new museum.
  8. Games. A specific pattern or series of beginning moves in certain games, especially chess.
  9. An opportunity affording a chance of success. See synonyms at opportunity.
  10. An unfilled job or position; a vacancy.


Image © 2008, David J. Bookbinder

Trust

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Pale Pink Tulip II
Among my other activities, I run a writing group for people with addiction issues, past or present. I call it “Memoirs of Addiction and Recovery.” We usually begin with a freewriting exercise, and either I or one of the group members supplies a prompt. A couple of weeks ago, the prompt was: “I know I can trust someone when ___________________.”
I typically write along with the group. What I came up with in response to this prompt surprised me, and I wanted to share it here.
I know I can trust someone when I’ve been to the mat with him or her and we’ve helped each other to rise. When I look into his/her eyes and I see the person looking at me looking into me as I look into him or her. When there is not just “me” and “you” but a tangible “us” that both “I” and “thou” want to ensure not only survives, but thrives. When there is either the absence of betrayal for long enough to know that betrayal is no longer an option, or there has been betrayal and the healing from it has been complete, and has cost us both so much pain, and so much pain about the other’s pain, that we can never, ever do that again. When there is not only love, but also empathy, and not only empathy but understanding, so that we each understand that to betray the trust would violate the love, and we both know what that would feel like, and we never want either of us, ever, to have to feel that way or, if we already have and have already healed, to feel that way again.
This, it turns out, is trust, for me. I’m interested in hearing how you, out there in cyberspace, would fill in that blank and would like to hear your thoughts, feelings, ideas, and experiences, either here or as comments in the Art, Healing, and Transformation group.
Thanks!
More anon,
– David
Discussion:
Trust
Art, Healing, and Transformation group
Flower Mandalas Project group
Cultivating Creativity group
Request a flower mandala screensaver: Fifteen Flower Mandalas
© 2008, David J. Bookbinder

For Boston-area readers: Two-Person Show and Talk

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Flower Mandalas at the Griffin Museum of Photography
Boston-area readers interested in seeing my work in person are invited to go to the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, Massachusetts. I will be part of a two-person show held in conjunction with the museum’s 14th Annual Juried Show. A short film about me and my “healing images” will be part of the show, and I will also be giving an informal gallery talk before the show’s opening.
Here’s the announcement:

Two-Person Show and Gallery Talk at the Griffin Museum of Photography
David Bookbinder, Flower Mandalas
Laurie Lambrecht, Lake Trees
Among the artists in the 14th Juried Exhibition, David Bookbinder and Laurie Lambrecht were chosen to present a joint show in the Atelier Gallery. Bookbinder exhibits Flower Mandalas, patterns of color and light that are digitally manipulated to create healing images. Lambrecht shows Lake Trees, a series of photographs of trees that reflects the ever-changing language of landscape.
Before the opening of the exhibits, museum members can enjoy a gallery talk with David Bookbinder.
Opening reception: June 5, 7-8:30PM
Gallery talk: June 5, 6:15-7PM
Show runs through August 31, 2008

Hope to see some of you there!
More anon,
David
Discussion:
Art, Healing, and Transformation group
Flower Mandalas Project group
Cultivating Creativity group
Request a flower mandala screensaver: Fifteen Flower Mandalas
Images © 2004-2008, David J. Bookbinder

T.K. Pippin: The Work of Art

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The Work of Art
by T.K. Pippin

To look at something as though we had never seen it before requires great courage.
-Henri Matisse

As a studio artist, poet and songwriter, I receive inspiration not only from the world around me, but also from within. I think these are both important because throughout life we are searching, purposefully, for connection. If we cannot see the world through the eyes of a serial killer then how can we understand the serial killer. It is not that we must become him, instead we must find his heart and mind and put ourselves in his place, to try to see what influenced him, what obstacles he endured and what his inner self compels him to do based on these.
The first step in my process is to lose myself, become free, forget myself, in order to understand something that I think I am not, but in the end, eventually find in myself. To open myself to what might flow through me.
The second step would be to put this into action, in any chosen medium, through pen and ink, paint and paper, or camera and film, or even a musical instrument, expressing what was conjured within. In my art I love using almost all mediums. I, myself, receive images of orbs, globes and dreamlike visions when I paint expressively. But, I also love drawing realistic charcoals and taking simple photographs of flowers.
The third process would be to edit, to perfect, because being human is to error, and though tedious, it is what makes us more than human, spirit, refined in the fire, to make ready and understandable or challenging for it’s audience.
The final step is delivery, which I might venture to say is the most difficult for me, because it exposes me and my thoughts, feelings, emotions, soul and even body to the audience. Whether it’s flower mandalas, music, drawings, paintings, poetry, or photography, it’s a part of us and we are most protective of ourselves. This fear of nakedness and rejection – but what we fear the most seems, in the end, to release us into greater freedom.
I find it funny how people around me see art and aesthetics to be almost like a missionary cause, like it should be free, as if, just because one is talented at art, she/he should give it away (maybe so in a utopian society where everything else is free). Like we don’t work for the result that they see, or have to eat or pay bills, that it is all fun and games and in turn should be handed out that way.
It is so much more, and this is where we get the starving artist and those who try to mimic this. The talent of art, in any form, is a gift, just like public relations or teaching or nursing. We WORK, we sweat, we use our time to give something with so much meaning to those who cannot express it themselves and yet we are seen as flighty, far-out, and unimportant.
Recent studies have shown otherwise. With sick and dying children in hospitals, those who are given rooms painted with big beautiful flowers, plants, and other visuals had substantially increased chances of recovery and survival compared to those who are placed in plain white-walled rooms. This speaks volumes of the importance of art in our communities and culture.
© 2008 T.K. Pippin
Discussion:
T.K. Pippin: The Work of Art
Art, Healing, and Transformation group
Flower Mandalas Project group
Cultivating Creativity group
Request a flower mandala screensaver: Fifteen Flower Mandalas

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