Fellowship of Saints and Sinners

Fellowship of Saints and Sinners

About the Fellowship

 This blog is for anyone who was told that once you invite Jesus into your life, you and your life will never be the  same  again- only to discover that what you were told was simply not true.  Life and the way you looked at it may  have  changed, but your old familiar patterns and ways of relating did not.  Not immediately, at least.  Not even  soon.  In  fact, you found yourself relearning the same lesson over and over again, so that your journey seemed a bit  more like  driving over and over again through the same roundabout while trying to read the signs to your  destination in a  foreign language.  Or, like stopping, then starting, and taking detours here and there. Other times  what you thought  was your point of destination, or at least the scenic route, turned out to be a dead end. 

If this experience resonates with yours, the good news is that you are not alone and you have come to the right place.  I suspect that there is a whole company of saints and sinners out there just like us for whom “conversion” has been a whole lot messier, incomplete and unrefined.  For whom there are days when it seems impossible to believe in a loving God, not to mention act like it.  For whom an experience of “church” has left us wanting and searching for more.  More depth.  More honesty.  More trust and authenticity.  More grappling with real questions.  Without the judgment.  More room for the grays.

Here we can find fellowship together: where I throw out thoughts, reflections, questions, doubts and proclamations, I invite you to join the conversation.  Hence, the term, “fellowship.”  We are a society or community of friends whose common bond is their identity as “saints” and “sinners.”  Who recognize their equality before God.  

Some definitions are in store here.  The term, “saint,” can vary across denominational and  religious lines, but my use here is in its broadest sense: “saints” are those who believe in God’s  love, embodied most clearly in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and are striving  to live into that reality.  ”Sinners” are those who fall short, miss the mark, transgress, break  moral laws, do bad, sometimes evil things and recognize the wretchedness of their sinful condition apart from the saving grace of God.

So this blog is really for anyone, “converted,” “unconverted,” or always “converting,” who seeks God in the messiness of real life.  St. Anselm called it “faith seeking understanding.”  Whatever it is, I would like to think that the journey will never end and that there’s plenty of grace to be had in the journeying itself.

Previous Posts

Mental Health Break—"Stile Antico"
Since it's been a while since our last mental health break...today's feature is the choral ensemble "Stile Antico" singing Thomas Tallis' "Miserere nostri." A friend introduced me to the group, and I'm so glad she did. Now they accompany me often in the car. En route to work sites. Picking up the ki

posted 11:00:20am Apr. 23, 2014 | read full post »

Easter Tremors
16 When the sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices, so that they might go and anoint him. 2 And very early on the first day of the week, when the sun had risen, they went to the tomb. 3 They had been saying to one another, “Who will roll away

posted 12:30:19pm Apr. 20, 2014 | read full post »

The Witness: A Good Friday Sermon
For the last three years I've had the privilege of participating in an annual ecumenical and interracial Good Friday service, "Women's Views o

posted 2:50:15pm Apr. 15, 2014 | read full post »

The Vatican Diaries: A Review
Sex. Money. Power. Corruption. Controversy. Scandal. Since the 1980's Catholic News Service reporter John Thavis has been covering all of it and more—not from a post in Las Vegas or the nation's Capitol but from (of all places) the Vatican. Which may explain why Thavis prefaces his New York

posted 11:06:12am Apr. 11, 2014 | read full post »

Lent Madness
In an effort to infuse this often somber season of Lent with a little humor and motivational pizzazz, one Episcopalian priest in Massachusetts has invented "Lent Madness." Four years ago Rev. Tim Schenck started the initiative, which pits some 32 saints in a basketball-type bracket squaring off as r

posted 9:58:05am Apr. 03, 2014 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.