Fellowship of Saints and Sinners

Fellowship of Saints and Sinners


Royalty in God’s Warehouse: A Christmas Story

Joseph: “He has the same eyes as the postman.”
Mary: “Jesus Christ, he’s beautiful!” (Painting, “The Nativity,” by Nicholas Poussin, 1653)

Every year the president of a large, nationwide trucking company makes a visit to every affiliate in cities across America.

It’s always a couple weeks before Christmas.

One of the men who works in the warehouse told me.  He’s always smiling, but this day he exclaimed, “You need to meet our president! What I love about him is that even though he’s the top guy, he treats us warehouse guys like we’re equals…”

Because of this, my warehouse buddy never misses a visit from the company president.

Humility in power we tend not to see much of these days- or, it tends to make the headlines less often than the abuses do.

Jesus, whom Christians worship as God Himself, didn’t just treat us like equals.  He became one of us.  How many times do we gloss over that familiar line in the Christmas story, “And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger (Luke 2:7)?”

God in Jesus became one of us, being born into this world as a poor, naked baby with no recognizable shred of worldly power to his name.

Just like every one of us, really.

I don’t care how much power one might acquire in this world that is passing away; at the end of the day, we were all once poor, naked babies and to dust we shall return.  We all had to have our diapers changed when we made big, runny poops.  We all cried when we were hungry, because that’s all we really could do.  One day, when we die, we’ll all be at the whim of Death’s shadow when Death chooses to pass over us.

At the end of the day, we’re all poor factory floor workers in God’s warehouse.

And in Jesus, God’s humiliation becomes our glory.

In Jesus, every one of us has the potential to be great, albeit not as we might typically think of “great.”

In Jesus, God comes to us to say we’re each worth a Savior.  We’re each worth redeeming- and this makes a whole world of difference.

God in Jesus says we’re more than mere warehouse workers: we’re royalty, and we can hold our heads high.

Merry Christmas, dear ones! We’ll catch you in the New Year- for more fellowship here at this intersection between life and God for anyone converted, unconverted or under conversion.  Until then, may your upcoming week be full of hope, love, joy and peace and all the gifts of Christmas!

 



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