Beliefnet
Everyday Spirituality

Luke 1

In the days of Herod, king of Judea, there was a priest named Zechariah, of the division of Abijah. And he had a wife from the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth. And they were both righteous before God, walking blamelessly in all the commandments and statutes of the Lord. But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and both were advanced in years.

11 And there appeared to him an angel of the Lord standing on the right side of the altar of incense. 12 And Zechariah was troubled when he saw him, and fear fell upon him. 13 But the angel said to him, “Do not be afraid, Zechariah, for your prayer has been heard, and your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you shall call his name John. 16 And he will turn many of the children of Israel to the Lord their God, 17 and he will go before him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to make ready for the Lord a people prepared.”

24 After these days his wife Elizabeth conceived, and for five months she kept herself hidden, saying, 25 “Thus the Lord has done for me in the days when he looked on me, to take away my reproach among people.” (The Bible, ESV)

A “blameless” innocent mind is open to the birth of an idea that will make a difference in the world. Nothing is impossible to God, Love. When a divine idea takes form in your thoughts, cherish is quietly, away from worldliness.

Santa Claus is a jolly reminder that many of the traditions engaged in during Christmas time were borrowed, maybe never to be returned. The traditions of gift-giving, tree decorating, feasting, and honoring gods, can be traced back to ancient Scandinavia, Germany, and Rome celebrating the winter solstice or New Year.

Movie, Christmas Unwrapped: A History of Christmas documented how, for more years than not, Christmas was a rowdy event. Drinking, indulgence, and carousing went on for days. It was centuries after Christ Jesus’ birth before churches stepped up as participants in the holiday.

Christmas as we see it today was fine-tuned in the 19th century when children were recognized as important during the festivities. The “family” approach tempered the holiday. Christmas carols, stories, and cards also became popular in the 19th century along with the nativity of Christ Jesus as a focal point.

It’s fair to put in a plug for Saint Nicholas―though exorbitantly marketed today―because the spirit of giving has truly been lived by individuals for centuries in many cultures. For example, in the 4th century A.D. Bishop Nicholas of Smyrna lived in what is known today as Turkey. Bishop Nicholas was a wealthy and generous man who loved and gave gifts to children. He was later given the title of Saint Nicholas.

Keeping Christmas in perspective, I hope you all have a blessed Holiday.

During the 20th century, ideas from the cultures of science and religion began intermarrying at an increasing rate. Staunch opponents to the unions dug in their heels and clung to their materialist and time-honored creeds but as a whole, society began adapting to the revolution. Over 100 years ago, Mary Baker Eddy wrote, “Sneers at the application of the word Science to Christianity cannot prevent that from being scientific.” (SH 341)

A scientific spirituality is doable, but requires thought transformation and increased practical understanding. Although the sciences have moved into the subatomic world of energy, physicists do not yet understand how the connected whole works. Although religions have moved into the realm of reason, faith practitioners have yet to grasp pragmatically how scientific spirituality works.

Not only can the relationships between science and religion be testy but the relationships within science or religion can go awry. What was scientifically proven valid yesterday becomes invalid today, or what was known to be true about God yesterday is ridiculous today. Human beings are programmed in dualism, use double-meaning terminology, and argue for what they know, even though the knowledge becomes obsolete before our very eyes.

Currently, all the rage is material and human energy. The phenomena of material and human energy are replacing the archaic notions of an absolute temporal universe. With the aid of technology, an infinite has been accepted; time and space are collapsing, and old maps of static information are fading, while an explosion of biofields, neural activity, chakras, and auras are being charted. The subject of connectedness and spirituality holds such strong promise and possibility, especially in light of healing, that thinkers from all backgrounds are investigating its application for use in daily life.

The investigation of divine Science recognizes the clear and total distinction between matter and Spirit; between human energy and divine energy. The term “human energy” connotes ever-changing configurations of forces as well as their general trend in mortal experiences. The term “divine energy” specifies the design of the one Spirit, Mind, as well as its unchanging expression of individual immortal consciousness as expressed through us and the universe—minus any reference to, or identification with, human minds, perceptions, or personalities.

The experiences involving human energy are only used as analogies to understanding the real and lasting divine energy. It is this divine energy that supports what is dubbed divine or Christian Science, and its healing practice. It is this divine energy that disallows a connection to negative material and human energy.

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