Beliefnet
Everyday Spirituality

lilac tree and mom 2 small lilac tree and mom small

I found this lilac tree out in the middle of a pasture, with no other lilac around. It is stunningly beautiful and majestic, reminding me of we read in 21st Century Science and Health, “Would life without friends be empty? Then the time will come when you will feel alone, without sympathy, but this vacuum is filled with divine Love. When this time comes, even if you cling to a sense of personal joys, spiritual Love will force you to accept what best promotes your spiritual growth. Friends will betray and enemies will slander, until the lesson is learned, and you are exalted; for “man’s extremity is God’s opportunity.”[1]


[1] Quote attributed to John Flavel, (1627–1691) English Presbyterian.

Mind is not an entity inside the brain with the power to go against Life, Truth, and Love, now or anytime.

When we were licensed foster parents, one of the children who stayed with us joined the Young Marines. The leader of the local Young Marines was outstanding. The foster boy truly responded to the discipline of the program. He was ready to participate in the annual Memorial Day service, therefore we all attended.

My respect grew. And, my respect to those who serve for our country continues to grow. Today, as a freelance reporter, I cover Memorial Day services and get to see a picture that shines a light on spirituality.

From 21st Century Science and Health, “We become more respectful and caring as we get to know the divine nature better and love Soul understandingly.”

So, for some reason I noticed Ingrid Bergman has noticeable nose. I watched the film, The Inn of the Sixth Happiness, a take on the life of Gladys May Aylward, portrayed by the actress, Ingrid Bergman. Maybe her nose stuck out to remind me it really doesn’t matter what body shape we have, it’s what we do with the body and mind that makes a difference and Ingrid Bergman did an outstanding job of acting.

Gladys May Aylward (1902-1970) was a British evangelical Christian who felt compelled to do her missionary work in China. I’m sure the film, The Inn of the Sixth Happiness was built loosely on reality, as all movies are, but it is worth seeing.

Created in 1958, The Inn of the Sixth Happiness is two-and-half hours long, so be prepared, but the storyline touches on selflessness, courage, and knowing one’s place in the world.

Knowing our place in the world comes with knowing our self as God knows us. Gladys May Aylward knew God made her honest, loving, giving, and strong. This attitude carried her to China where she adopted children and adapted to another culture where she learned to help them as they understood.