Beliefnet
Everyday Spirituality

Illegal and illicit activities occur. They don’t normally set very well with society and they certainly don’t promote happiness or health.

What is illegal and what is illicit? That is debatable. And, the definitions change over time and according to known laws.

Today, it’s generally accepted that it is illegal to steal because it breaks the law of the land, and the law of respect for one another.

These laws develop over time.

I’m reading an eye-opening book by John Barry, Roger Williams with The Creation of the American Soul. The book conveys how laws were developed to separate state and church.

Roger Williams was born at the turn of the 17th century, in England. He grew up to become involved with politics and religion, considered inseparable at the time.

Laws were written and enforced, such as, if you didn’t attend church, your ears could be cut off.

But, England’s 17-century, King James, believed he was above the law. He had the last word.

Williams felt the king was not above the law.

Roger Williams became a controversial figure because of his ideas on freedom of worship and civil freedom. Williams was so controversial that he fled to America to save his life.

This idea resonated with me as revisionist of Science and Health, by Mary Baker Eddy. I feel revisions are requisite, mainly because that is what Eddy said in Science and Health, on page 361. However, it occurred to me why Eddy could say revisions were requisite.

Science and Health is not above the law of progress.

 

 

Researchers spend time trying to understand how the body’s immune system works. The immune system is responsible for fighting foreign invaders to your body and also for destroying cells within the body that become diseased.

Although disease is not a joke, people joke that they didn’t eat enough dirt when they were a kid to develop a strong immune system. Society has realized the importance of cleanliness, however, too much clean reduces the need for a strong immune system and immune deficiencies result.

This scenario sparks the question, How is my spiritual immunity?

Spirituality is vital. Our spirituality fights off that which invades our peace and health. However, in order to have a strong spirituality, with a strong spiritual immunity, we must not be afraid to eat some dirt.

First, we can’t confuse immunity with being on the defense as though there is a potent evil force in the world.

Second, spirituality is wonderful, especially when it does bring peace and health. But we don’t want to fool ourselves and think we can create a sterile peace and health by hanging out with likeminded people or avoiding situations we think will adversely affect our spirituality.

There is no sterile environment here on earth. There is no pure tradition, teaching, or lifestyle. Challenges exist because progress is a law, and spirituality is in a constant state of progress, therefore we can go into the world and build up our spiritual immunity.

From 21st Century Science and Health, “Entire immunity from the belief in sin, suffering, and death may not be reached at this level, but we may expect a decrease in these evils; and this scientific beginning is in the right direction.”

A prayer before the CROP walk

A prayer before the CROP walk

Churches in the nearby Village participated in the annual CROP Walk. A chipper group of participants walked 6 miles to raise funds to fight hunger.

The CROP walk began circa 1947. The CROP acronym has since outgrown itself. Originally intended as the Christian Rural Overseas Program, CROP’s mission has expanded out of primarily sharing food from Midwest farm families to help feed European post-World War II neighbors, into a mission that now strives to feed the world. CROP walk funds also used to assist during disasters and to provide clean water worldwide.

The United Ministry Church hosts the event. This was their 30th year and they’ve raised over $135,000. Combining the walk with community spirit, they also hosted a soup and bread dinner after the walk.

Eddie

Eddie

The conduit to freedom appears to be the game of soccer, however, after briefly speaking with Eddie Kingston, the conclusion is made that freedom comes from an indomitable spirit. The life-force of Eddie Kingston moved him out of the war torn country of Liberia only to return years later through a Play For Peace Foundation. The Foundation is designed to help kids find inspiration. “Our family escaped Liberia when I was about 12 years old,” said Eddie Kingston unpretentiously. “We lived at a refugee camp in Ghana for over 3 years.” After receiving Asylum status, the family came to America and the adventure for Eddie continued.

While on a soccer scholarship, Eddie Kingston earned a Criminal Justice degree and a Pre-law degree from the University of Illinois. He qualified as an All-American his Freshman, Sophomore, and Senior year. After college, he was recruited to play professional soccer. “I played professionally for 7 years,” said Kingston. “I played for clubs in the countries of Zagreb, Croatia, then 3 years in South East Asia.” Because Eddie Kingston played in Liberia when he was younger, he represented his home country of Liberia.

When asked how many languages he speaks, Kingston modestly remarks, “Five. I probably have a knack for learning different languages, but I had to work very hard to learn them because I had to know what the coaches were saying.” Kingston attributes his quick learning to the fact that words came easier while out on the soccer field where he could relate the words with an action.

“I played for Liberia between 2002 and 2004 in an International Soccer Competition, involving many countries,” said Kingston.  The invitation to play goes to a select group, the best and Eddie Kingston took the opportunity and worked hard to excel. Today, the efforts are aimed to succeed the Play for Peace Foundation, meant to bring soccer to kids in Liberia, showing them there are positive things to do in life.

Today, to give back to the world, Eddie Kingston is devoted to Play for Peace.