Beliefnet
Everyday Spirituality

Mother’s Day is celebrated in many countries around the world, usually in spring. Dates vary from country to country and this year’s Mother’s Day in the United States falls on May 11.

Americans will spend an average of $162.94 on mom this year, down from a survey high of $168.94 last year. Total spending is expected to reach $19.9 billion. But, I don’t want to write about brunch, bouquets, and bling.

I met up with mothers in many forms and discovered an array of motherly advice worth cursor movement.

First were foster mothers. Gina, Claudia, and Vicki all live in different towns yet network to provide the best care for children of the State. They provide respite care. I could write pages about their experiences, but will reduce it to a list of that which struck me most:

  • Success is overcoming a challenge.
  • Children are full of life.
  • I can’t imagine life without children.
  • We can make a permanent decision in a temporary situation.
  • Consistency is the best medicine for children.
  • Following through on the State rules and regulation is a small price to pay for the reward and satisfaction of improving a life.
  • Don’t respond to a temporary action but have the faith to see a deeper answer.

I also met case workers and support staff for foster homes who also expressed the same motherly qualities that shone so attractively in the foster mothers. The mothering I found in the community far outdid the monetary statistics in impressiveness.

From Proverbs 31, ESV: “She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the teaching of kindness is on her tongue. She looks well to the ways of her household and does not eat the bread of idleness. Her children rise up and call her blessed.”

 

 

 

By time you read this sentence, everything around you has changed. The earth has moved. You have new cells in your body. Clouds have shifted. Grass has grown. Birth and death has occurred.

This changeable human life experience is thrilling, mind-boggling, nauseating, and rampant. The questions and answers that bombard our minds need to be filtered.

Dialogue in 21st Century Science and Health filters out questions and answers that soothe the soul, guide the mind, and feed the body.

The prose is circular, but it circles a mindful, loving, healing God. You can start reading on page one, or page three hundred and twenty-two, or page fifty-seven. You can read a heady sentence such as, “The beautiful, whole, and pure constitute our ancestry,” and think about it for hours, days, or years.

This is a book for truth seekers and practitioners.

 

New York State is clamping down on drivers who use mobile devices while driving. Statistics show that distracted driving makes for dangerous situations and terrible accidents.

With technology at our finger tips, human beings have become so acclimated to instantaneous communication that our bodies automatically react to answer the cell-phone, text a message, or look at the news flash passing over the iPAD.

The behavior all seems like a new problem. But it’s not.

Distraction is an old, old problem for humanity.

What distracts?

Fear, anger, jealousy, pride, impatience, morbid curiosity, obsessions, hate, need I go on?

I can picture my mom and dad, moving the family from the east coast to the west coast. Driving in a car with 3 toddlers floating around. No seat belts. Not many McDonald’s along the way, if any.  Changing diapers, breast feeding, making sandwiches all while driving.

And, my ancestors before that were probably riding their horses around the country, vulnerable to the distractions of bears and weather and hunger.

We read in the Gospel, “Martha was distracted with much serving,” at a time when Jesus came to visit the home and she was working in the kitchen. Martha even asks, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her then to help me.” (Luke 10:40)

Jesus’ answer to Martha helps us learn how to un-distract ourselves. “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and troubled about many things, but one thing is necessary. Mary has chosen the good portion, which will not be taken away from her.”

Seeking Christ, as Mary sought Christ, is seeking awareness, patience, acumen, integrity, and generosity, all qualities we can manifest while driving.

From 21st Century Science and Health, “Every step toward spirituality is a departure from materiality and is a tendency toward God, Spirit. Material theories partially paralyze this attraction toward infinite and eternal good by a distraction to the measurable, flamboyant, and chaotic.”

A psychotherapist in the profession for 35 years, told me during an interview, “We aren’t born with the skill to communicate with human beings. It has to be learned.” He is also an Episcopal Priest and has been for 42 years.

His insight to approach communication from a systems point of view and wisdom has made a positive impact on his clients lives.

His goal to help marriages, families, and people systematically overcome miscommunication and drug and alcohol abuse has been reached multiple times. Negativity falls before that which is positive and satisfying in life.

We read about a divine system in 21st Century Science and Health, “Negativity is like an undeveloped thought with no motive, but afterward it controls human beings. Infatuation, self-destructive appetites, dishonesty, envy, hatred, and revenge ripen into action, only to pass from shame and despair to their final self-punishment.”

“Doctors, therapists, and so on, though humane, are artists who outline their thoughts relative to disease…The physician’s thoughts and their patient’s commingle, and the stronger thoughts rule the weaker. This is why it is important for doctors to study and practice the universal law of Truth and Love.”