Advertisement

Everyday Spirituality

Everyday Spirituality

Survival of the Fittest

posted by Cheryl Petersen

Survival of the Fittest is a theory that has been around for centuries. Dubbed a natural selection, survival of the fittest relates to those organisms that best adapt to existing conditions and are able to survive and reproduce.

The theory is fascinating. I’ve gained a new view of the survival of the fittest in the 21st century. The theory doesn’t only relate only to physical survival but also metaphysical.

Because we live in a society that aims to garner more humanity, handicapped people are given the respect they deserve. Some people make it very clear that although handicapped physically, they are superbly able to adapt and survive. Why?

Advertisement

The mental states of a zest for life, humor, good-will, gentleness, peacemaking, courage, and serenity are powerfully strong. Though physically handicapped, their mental states are fit. They are survivors. The metaphysical qualities were also exemplified in Christ, manifest as the true idea of God.

From 21st Century Science and Health,”Divine Science differs from the hard and soft sciences, because it has a complete unified theory. The Science of Christ is preeminently scientific because it is based on Truth, the Principle of all science.”

penguins

Advertisement

Keeping Tabs on Zeal

posted by Cheryl Petersen

The ceaseless struggle between religious zealotry and common sense conjures conflict and confusion. Zealotry is destructive. Common sense is sometimes uncommon.

Zealotry is defined as fanaticism or excessive intolerance of opposing views. But, it also can mean ardor or fervor.

Common sense is defined as good sense and sound judgment in practical matters.

zeal-for-lifeThe word “zeal” is found in some Bible versions in the Psalms and the Gospel John. “Because zeal for Your house has eaten me up.” NKJV

Advertisement

The phrase “common sense” is read in more modern Bible versions, but is found in life examples in all Bibles. Prophets used sound judgment fervently, though it went against the grain.

Common sense is allowed. Zeal can be practical. It starts with a sensible practical God.

God is Life, Truth, and Love.

There is no fanaticism, no burning desire, no jealousy in God. The things of heaven are not like the things on earth yet we can experience a hint of heaven here and now. We can experience the ardor of common sense in practical matters. Relationships can be peaceful. Jobs can be satisfying. Progress can be made.

Advertisement

Trauma of Torture

posted by Cheryl Petersen

While reading The Searchers, by Glen Frankel, I had to turn off my Nook. The book depicts the horrors of an Indian raid on early Americans in Texas. Members of the Comanche tribe attacked and tortured a group of settlers. Cynthia Ann Parker was taken captive at the age of nine. She was rescued 24 years later, but wanted to return to her Comanche family.

Attack and torture are phenomena that make my stomach contort and tighten; gagging the humanity of human beings. Yet, professional physicians and surgeons poke or cut off body parts every day. The recipients, and movie stars, who survive are heroic.

I ponder the result of Christ Jesus’ experience as found in 21st Century Science and Health: “The last supreme moment of mockery, desertion, and torture added to an overwhelming sense of the magnitude of Jesus’ work. From his lips was wrenched the awful cry, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”[1] If a human parent was asked this heart-broken question, it would deny the justice and love of whom Jesus knew to be his Maker. Jesus appealed to his divine Principle, the God who is Love, and to himself, Love’s pure idea. Had Life, Truth, and Love forsaken him in his highest demonstration? This was a startling question. No! God and Christ Jesus must remain united or that hour would be deprived of its mighty blessing for human beings.”


[1] Matt. 27:46; Mark 15:34

Advertisement

Brides Cooking

posted by Cheryl Petersen

It’s been “Brides Cooking” all over again at our house. Thirty years ago, I pumped out what is famously known as brides cooking. Now, my husband has been doing a lot of the cooking and we’ve been eating some interesting meals. The other night for dinner, we sat down and I looked at my plate and remarked, “Wow, you’re getting rather proficient.”

Timing is a nuisance for my husband. The meatloaf will be finished half an hour before the pasta and the salad will be remembered tomorrow. But, alas, we can eat in stages.

So, the other night, for the main fact that the piece of ham, the biscuit, and the corn on the cob was pretty much done at the same time, was remarkable. I cut the biscuit in half and put the slice of ham in the middle with mustard, since mustard was on the table.

Advertisement

Picking up this cute little sandwich was a mistake. The biscuit fell apart. After a bite, I realized why, baking powder and salt don’t always hold units together. I finished it with a fork. My husband tried to glue his biscuit together with honey. It was a mess.

Because we are cheap, if the food is anywhere close to edible, we will eat it. Another oddity (and I have no idea where my husband got the notion that old-fashioned, 3-minute, oatmeal must be added to almost everything), is that uncooked oat flakes should get mixed in with everything from green beans and taco filling. But, just as my husband endured my brides cooking, I too will endure. And, we will get a good laugh in the meantime.

From 21st Century Science and Health, “Gentle words, and an unselfish attention to detail in what promotes the success of your spouse, will prove valuable in prolonging one another’s health and smiles. Don’t practice stolid indifference or resentment. Remember, a simple heartfelt word or deed is powerful enough to renew the romance.”

Advertisement

 biscuit crumbly closeup

 biscuit and corn

 

 

Previous Posts

Unfixed memory in the know
A friend brought to my attention the theory of a fixed memory. I hadn’t thought about it before, but I realized I sort of buy into this theory. A fixed memory requires unloading some information in order to add more memory. With so many ...

posted 8:09:41am Feb. 09, 2016 | read full post »

Four things NOT to do on Valentine’s Day
Don’t think you have to eat out at a fancy restaurant. The tradition of eating someplace extraordinary requires reservations and yes, waiting, because so many other people are doing the same thing on Valentine’s Day. You can instead eat ...

posted 8:03:34pm Feb. 02, 2016 | read full post »

Religion today, part VII
Now that the word Islam no longer terrifies me, I can stand up against Islamophobia with understanding. From, 21st Century Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, we read, "Christian Science requires us to improve our intentions. ...

posted 7:50:26am Jan. 25, 2016 | read full post »

Islamic image today, part VI
After getting know better my neighboring Muslims, my concept of Islam was detaching from the “unknown” or “scary” and attaching to peace and joy. Spirituality became the focus rather than religion. To stereotype a religion is to ...

posted 7:45:40am Jan. 20, 2016 | read full post »

The Islam image today, part V
At the Muslim Sufi Center, I was taken under the wings of two women, I’ll call them S and K. They explained what everyone was doing as the evening progressed. I was introduced to Shaykh Hoja then we all sat on the floor to listen to the ...

posted 7:39:08am Jan. 15, 2016 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.