Beliefnet
Everyday Spirituality

Immigration in reverse is depicted in the movie, Shanghai Calling. Starring Daniel Henney, Eliza Coupe, and Zhu Zhu, this film portrays people moving to China from America. Instead of a China Town in New York City, there is an America Town in Shanghai.

One immigrant, however, arrived not by his own free will. An ambitious lawyer was sent to China to promote a law firm based in New York City. The lawyer, played by Daniel Henney, brought with him archaic views of China, only to be dispelled by the 21st century globalized reality.

The romantic comedy couples the lawyer with an American woman, played by Eliza Coupe. This American ran away from a marriage, with her daughter to a place where she does speak the language.

The lawyer’s assistant, played by Zhu Zhu, shows the fierce determination to advance in the world, minus the need to move to another country. Her character finds peace with the Chinese traditions while yet rising in her career.

The lawyer however takes the whole 1 hour and 38 minute film to learn the value of integrity and family.

The film, Shanghai Calling is family worthy. Although the romantic aspect was cheesy, at least it was clean. It cleverly exposed how human beings can dream up presumptions and scenarios that rarely reflect reality. An element of people helping people can also be appreciated.

 

all 3 on tree limb smallDogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole,–Roger Caras

Cats are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.

Children are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.

Jobs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.

Politics are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.

Religions are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.

Hobbies are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.

I can relate somewhat to the Buddhist perspective that the mind is non-physical, formless, shapeless, colorless, genderless, and has the capacity to cognize or know. The basic nature of mind is pure, limitless and pervasive.

For this mind to also produce sickness doesn’t make sense to me though. Too contradictory for a mind to be both healthy and sick. So, I contemplate Mary Baker Eddy’s thought that distinguishes between human mind and divine Mind.

The human mind creates the physical situation. Or rather, the human mind holds within its mental chambers health or sickness and then feels them and calls the feelings a body.

The divine Mind is non-physical, formless, shapeless, colorless, genderless, all-knowing, and infinite. It knows health only. It never changes from knowing goodness and wellbeing. From this basis, healing of the physical can occur when the human mind yields to the divine Mind.

Science confirms the possibility of healing. Divine Science confirms the mental power to know the Mind of God, which includes health and holy purpose. Physical science confirms healing also but unless the mind is realized as a component, the healing is a mystery.

The New York Public Library’s Science Desk Reference notes, “There are between 50 and 75 trillion cells in the body…. Each type of cell has its own life span, and when a human dies it may take hours or day before all the cells in the body die.” Every seven years (or 10, depending on which story you hear) we become essentially new people, because in that time, every cell in your body has been replaced by a new cell.

Though the body changes every 7 years, we basically are the same people, showing that mind must be an element in our figuring. The revision of the body doesn’t change our meaning.

To relate to the meaning of divine Mind even establishes our ability to heal without a lingering mystery.

It was no mystery to me when I displaced fear with appreciation and my skin healed after being burnt.

A biography of C.S. Lewis, by Alister McGrath, is worth the read. It broadened my sense of C.S. Lewis beyond Narnia and Mere Christianity. Lewis’ life shows the possibilities and limitations of the human mind. He went from an atheistic belief system to defending Christianity. He produced a plethora of material that has since been developed even further.

I remember watching, and loving, the film The Chronicles of Narnia. This was an example of how images and sounds can speak to us about the power of good over evil.

It reminds me to listen to the falling snow and hear peace. It reminds me to watch the images of people walking side-by-side and see love.

It also reminds me that the belief system of today may not be the belief system of tomorrow. To judge what is before me, I must do it with a caliber of flexibility that allows me to adapt to changes yet while still knowing the steadiness of God, good.