Everyday Spirituality

Everyday Spirituality


Movie Review: The Magic of Belle Isle

posted by Cheryl Petersen

Rated PG, The Magic of Belle Isle is watched with relief. A washed out celebrated author, Monte Wildhorn (played by Morgan Freeman) takes up summer residency in a house that neighbors a single mother and her three daughters.

Directed by Rob Reiner, The Magic of Belle Isle reveals the pains of loss and the confusion that juxtaposes divorce. However, credit to script, characters focus on one another’s talents and contributions to society. The few innuendos associated with sexuality were regarded as inferior to the assets of humanity and creativity–a plus to the movie.

Monte Wildhorn regularly used his excellent grasp on the English language, supported with an extensive vibrant vocabulary. The single mother played the piano beautifully. The daughters were genuine sisters that expressed concern for one another’s well fair, yet still exhibited impatience.

Monte Wildhorn was supposedly a drunk before the neighboring house of feminine wisdom tempered his goal to self-destruct through alcohol. Morgan Freeman’s performed admirably the part of a jaded author, however, sloshed people slur their words more.

Typical to Hollywood, no one has real money problems in The Magic of Belle Isle. As a viewer, I had to remind myself that usually single mothers are working a job, driving an older vehicle, and not granting their children expensive birthday parties.

A feel good movie that makes you wonder why life doesn’t turn out like this for everyone, but yet still offers the possibility.

109 minutes, Filmed 2012



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