Everyday Spirituality

Everyday Spirituality


Seclusion in the City of Redmond

posted by Cheryl Petersen

Writers dream of moving to a secluded, calm location and getting a lot of writing done. What’s funny is, I live in a rural area, definitely calm, and I still get writers block. But, here I am in Redmond, in a setting proliferated by busy people and the Microsoft Headquarters, with an overkill of time to write. My only distraction is walking the dog, because I am here pet sitting while our daughter travels with her husband.

I am surrounded by high tech, fast moving everything. When I take the dog for a walk, other walkers are texting or talking into doo-dads stuck on their ears. I don’t even own a cell phone. My daughter taught me how to call my husband on her phone and that is the extent of my usage.

In the house, I can’t even watch a movie because I can’t figure out how to operate the TV. I already crashed one computer so am working on a mini laptop. I know, our daughter’s husband will come home and say, “Oh, all you had to do was click the 9 ratio equivalent key and the computer would start right up.”

So, sitting here in Redmond, surrounded by vehicles, technology, and coffee shops (I’m not much for coffee), I am quietly writing. Oh, and reading.

The Redmond Library is fabulous. They don’t even have librarians to check you out or in. It’s all self-checking. Computers scan and give you a read out.

I am reading Microtrends by Mark Penn, and it is keeping me intrigued. Penn is a respected pollster in American politics and Microtrends covers a gamut of topics from old new dads, to unisexuals, to bourgeois and bankrupt. Under the unisex topic, Penn mentions that Unisexuals “may be the ideological heirs of the feminist, and revolutionary, principle that biology need not be destiny.”

From Science and Health, ” How can the brain, heart, blood, DNA, etc. be our identity? If our real nature is the material bodily structure, a portion of our being would be gone if a limb was amputated; a surgeon could remove our manhood or womanhood; or bacteria would annihilate our existence. What happens to the identity of an organ recipient? Or, how can DNA be the foundation of our identity? DNA mutates, replicates, and eventually dies therefore it can’t be a source of life. After a person is gone their DNA is still here on earth, so where is the individual? On another note, people have repeatedly proven that the loss of a limb cannot take away their manliness or womanliness. Many people, classified as disabled, have presented more nobility, more manliness and womanliness, than the polished athlete or glamour model—teaching society that true identity and nature comes from spirituality, consciousness.”



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