Everyday Spirituality

Everyday Spirituality

Thanking Vets is to Learn From Vets

Veterans were first collectively remembered on November 11, 1919, set as Armistice Day. Celebration originally centered on suspension of business for a 2 minute period beginning at 11 a.m. with the day also filled by public meetings and parades. On June 1, 1954, President Eisenhower signed legislation changing the name of the legal holiday from Armistice Day to Veteran’s Day.

Most of us know a veteran. One veteran in particular, who I know personally, Mr. Fischer, has taught me valuable lessons. I have to fight for independence. And, that fight involves sacrifice. But, the sacrifice is not to be bemoaned. No whining. When a job needs to be done, do it with courage and humility.

Mr. Fischer, who served in the Army for 20 years, has views that coincide with what I just read in November 6 Parade Magazine. An Unbreakable Bond interviewed 6 wars, 6 vets. Yenas Hagos, who served in Iraq responded to the question as to whether or not he sees himself as a hero. Hagos answered, “No. I went and served my country. I did my part.”


Colin L. Powell, retired U.S. Army General, also provided his insights, pointing out that men and women are motivated for different reasons to serve but after joining they give their all for our country.

Veteran’s Day is every day. To maintain the spirit of gratitude for those who fight for our country, I read books such as Colin Powell’s autobiography, My American Journey. Words from veterans unlock the naïvety that tempts me to take things for granted. I have to work for my freedom to understand, be spiritually minded, be healthy, and have the ability to have good-will toward all people.



From 21st Century Science and Health, “If Truth is overcoming error in your daily walk and talk, you are a better person and can finally say, “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith.” This is having our part in the at-one-ment with Truth and Love. Don’t continue working and praying, expecting a surrogate savior, expecting that because of another person’s goodness, suffering, and triumph, that you will reach that person’s harmony and reward.”

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