Dream Gates

Dream Gates


The flight pioneer who learned from dreams of the future that the time is always Now

posted by Robert Moss

I am giving a talk in London tonight on “Dreaming the Future”. We are time travelers in our dreams and one thing that goes on, probably every night, is that the dream self travels into the possible future, scouting out challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. Depending on whether we remember such dream scouts, and can read the information correctly, and can then decide on appropriate action, we can move away from undesirable future events and towards ones that are more attractive.

Since I am going to speak on these things in Britain, I am thinking of a great pioneer researcher in this field who was in every way a product of Britain in the Edwardian era. I can think of few less likely candidates for Psychic Friends Network – as either client or reader – than J.W.Dunne (1875-1949). A gentleman soldier and aviator, he came out of the Anglo-Irish military caste. He designed and built the first British military aircraft, and his prototype was soon adopted and manufactured in the United States. He was devoted to fly fishing. In all things, he was a determined scientist and rationalist who looked for the logic in life’s anomalies. Like the best Britons, he was also marvelously pragmatic: if the data presented to him did not fit existing theories of how things worked, then to hell with the theories.

The data that shook Dunne’s conception of reality – first when he was a sub-lieutenant of the Imperial Yeomanry, fighting the Boers, then when he was convalescing in Italy, and many times later – were dreams in which he saw, with remarkable accuracy, events that lay in the future. Sometimes his dreams anticipated news of world events that he had not yet received. His dreams gave him “news flashes” of an earthquake in Madagascar and of troop movements in Sudan long before the newspapers arrived with printed reports of those events.

Dunne started keeping a detailed journal of his dreams, and found that he dreamed of the future – on average – as often as the past. This led him to realize that in dreams, time works differently than in our usual experience of waking life. He drew friends and family members into an ongoing “Experiment with Time” and collected a great deal of data on “time displacement” as observed in dreams. He extended his experiments into waking precognition – for example, by trying to guess what he would find in a book he would later pick up at random in his club. He quickly concluded that precognition can be achieved in waking states as well as in dreams, but requires “a steadying of attention” and practice in controlling the imagination that are not easily attained. He published his findings in1927  a book titled An Experiment with Time that had wide influence in the interval between the two world wars; it was read and eagerly discussed by many leading scientists, writers and politicians.

Dunne evolved a complex mathematical model he called Serialism in his effort to account for the fact that time does not move in a linear fashion in dreams – and perhaps in the larger universe. In his last book,  Intrusions?,  published posthumously, he makes the bold statement that his precognitive dreams were “caused by something which I was going to experience in waking life later on”.

This is a most interesting theory: that future events not only cast a shadow before them, but cause us to dream of them – and perhaps, in dreaming, to help bring a certain event track into our physical experience, out of an immense range of alternative possible futures.

In Intrusions?, he  provided further details of the precognitive dreams recounted in An Experiment with Time that he suppressed in the earlier book, apparently for fear of not sounding scientific and respectable. The strongest  dream “intrusions” containing glimpses of the future were often accompanied by inner voices, sometimes a tremendous chorus of voices crying “Look, look, look!” He describes this phenomenon as the “rousing of attention”.

Dunne moved towards the understanding that our experience of  linear time  is an illusion of the limited ordinary mind. Viewed from the fourth dimension,  past, present and future are in fact simultaneous and only experienced sequentially because of our mental perception of them. In the dream state the mind was not shackled in this way and was able to perceive events in the past and future with equal facility.

 



  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Patricia

    Great piece Robert.
    I had a strange incident with texting and wonder about the mind traveling or psychic connections and elecronics. At 10:22 I text my neighbor: Wnat to go to lunch or a walk? Then at 10:23 I find myself texting back a wrong number that beeped in with a text that said: I just got here and got a small table it’s packed. The interesting thing is that the time of the wrong number texted wAs 11:26? I wonder with increased use and sophistication of technology if this reality of time not being linear will be more common understanding? I am very curious about all this and will enjoy looking into Dunnes writings, if I can get a hold of his book(s).

    Also last night I dreamed of a little girl with long black hair sitting in a chair that starts to boil up and she starts screaming. Today at work I walk into a room where a little girl with long black hair I work with is screaming. I discovered that she had a horrible boil on her bottom and proceed to teach her how to tuck her leg under her so she will not sit on the boil. More to the story, but that’s it in a nutshell.

  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Don

    The question of time intereses me, Robert.
    This is the kind of thing that really boggles my mind. Time must go from an infinate past to an infinite future. If not, what was there before time existed, and for how long? There had to be time. Likewise, time not passing in a linear fashion also boggles my mind. Perhaps my mind is too easily boggled. :-)

    The idea that one can dream the future suggests that the future prexisted, that it is also in the past. I, too, have dreamed the future at times. I believe that through suitable ritual one can change the future, the outcome, of an event. If so, is one changing the past when one does that?

    I placed an order for the book “An Experiment With Time,” third edition. Maybe it will help. But I suspect my mind will still be boggled.

    Thank you very much for posting on that thought provoking subject.

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