Dream Gates

Dream Gates


Dreams of George Orwell and “1984″

posted by Robert Moss

A dream changed the mind of one of the greatest political writers of the twentieth century. George Orwell (Eric Arthur Blair) reached a watershed in his thinking in the summer of 1939, when he discovered that – despite his deep commitment to revolutionary causes and ideas of the Left – he remained a patriot at heart, ready to fight and die for his country. The change was worked by a dream.

In his essay “My Country Right or Left” Orwell recalled that the night before the Nazi-Soviet Pact was announced he dreamed that the war had started. “It was one of those dreams which, whatever Freudian inner meaning they may have, do sometimes reveal to you the real state of your feelings. It taught me two things, first, that I should be simply relieved when the long-dreaded war started, secondly, that I was patriotic at heart, would not sabotage or act against my own side, would support the war, would fight in it if possible.” A few weeks earlier, he had been calling for the creation of  an underground network to spread anti-war propaganda in the event that hostilities broke out between Britain and Germany; no thought of that now.

     In his terrifying parable Nineteen Eighty-Four, Orwell’s protagonist, Winston Smith, is a dreamer, and resistance to Big Brother begins with a dream. Winston Smith dreams that as he walks in the dark, a man’s voice tells him that they will meet in “a place without darkness”. He trusts that voice and it sows the hope that there are others who oppose the Party. His first act of defiance is to start keeping a journal. He writes his private thoughts in a contraband notebook just out of view of the spy cameras of the Thought police that are built into the “telescreen” on the wall that spews out propaganda day and night and cannot be turned off.

In the second dream reported in the novel, Winston finds himself in a place of freedom in nature, in a “rabbit-bitten” field where fish swim in green pools under the willows. In this “golden country”, a young woman throws off her clothes with magnificent abandon, defying the Party’s ban on love and passion. As he embraces her, Winston becomes a rebel, and knows rebellion is possible.

In Orwell’s novel, both dreams are played out. The young woman from the second dream invites Winston to a tryst in the landscape of his golden country. As their love blossoms, she promises that whatever happens, “They can’t get inside you.”

Alas, the way the earlier dream is manifested proves her wrong. Winston decides to confide his hopes of fighting the regime to a senior Party member he believes to be the voice in his dream. The “place without darkness” proves to be a torture cell where the lights are never turned off, where the prisoner’s mind is raped until he is ready to believe any lie he is told to repeat, and to betray everything he ever loved.



  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Don

    I have thought a lot about “1984″ during my lifetime.

    As a teenager I had experienced some of WW II. In 1948 I qualified for the Olympics in London. I did badly. The war damage in London was incredible. Then I went to Germany where I hoped to meet my German relatives. I wanted to see how they made it. MY GOD! The damage there was even more incredible.

    Upon my return home I received a draft notice. I did not know what to do. I thought I had become a conscientious objector. I could not bring myself to carry a gun. But what do you do about people like Hitler, Tojo, and Mussolini? Instead of being drafted for a short term, I enlisted for a longer term on the condition that I would be a non-combatant. That led to my being a medic during the Korean war. That was my 1948 and on into the 1950s.

    In 1984 I qualified to compete as a member of the Senior Masters International in their games. They were held in connection with the 1984 Olympic games. I did wonderfully well. But since I chose to run one race barefoot I was accused being from South Africa. (Remember Zola Budd?) I had to prove my citizenship or I would be disqualified. And I faced other problems and restrictions.

    That was my 1984, and on into the present. The Vietnam War ended in 1975, but USA has been involved in a lot of other warfare since then. Locally there are increasing laws, regulations, and restrictions. Big Brother is watching more than ever.

    George Orwell was right. I know his feelings about conscientious objection. And his predictions about the rise of Big Brother were absolutely correct.

    Your post reached me very deeply, Robert.

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