Dream Gates

Dream Gates


Spit out your negative mantras

posted by Robert Moss

5 of Swords (Thoth deck); mind-induced defeat

I don’t agree that we can’t afford the luxury of a negative thought; “bad” thoughts and feelings can give us essential life guidance, including on quite primal survival issues, and can become a source of useful energy when we learn to work with them rather than succumb to them. However, I am firm in my conviction that we cannot afford the luxury of a negative mantra.

I hear good people who should know better bringing themselves down every day by saying things like:

“I’m too old”

“I’m a klutz”

“I don’t have the money to do what I want”

“My job sucks.”

“I can’t draw” (or write, or hang-glide, or speak in public)

I’m no good at…” (fill in the blank)

“I have no choice”

“It’s not up to me”

I also hear people harping negative beliefs about the world and the people around them in ways that limit possibility and invite bad experiences, because when we project bad expectations on the world, the world will respond in kind.

A negative mantra is a repetitive thought, that you energize by speaking in your mind or, worse still, out loud. Every time you repeat a mantra of this kind, you close doors in front of you and put yourself inside a box. You bring into operation that principle that Thoreau expressed very well: “A man who stands in his own way will find the whole world stands in his way.”

Go on like this, and you can help to generate the condition that is symbolized, for me, by the 5 of Swords in Tarot: mind-induced defeat. My personal name for this card is “Harpies Crapping On My Head”. The harpies in question are the parts of me that keep harping on thoughts and memories that bring me down.

I recommend the following: Every time you catch yourself – or a friend catches you – committing a negative mantra, spit it out. I mean literally. Go outside, or into the bathroom, and get it out in a way that your body can believe. We hold experiences and beliefs in our bodies, so somatic release may be essential and of course to do a thorough job of that you may want to go beyond expectorating. But spitting it out is something you can do almost anywhere, any time. In my workshops, I send people outside to do it when we catch them committing a negative mantra. Newcomers are sometimes thunderstruck and disbelieving when they receive the instruction, but they are almost always lighter and freer and happier after they have followed it.

 



Previous Posts

Questioning dreams in ancient Mesopotamia
Our earliest records of the work of a dream interpreter come from ancient Mesopotamia. Here the person you asked for help with your dream was called the “questioner”. On clay tablets from Assur and Nineveh, the “questioner” is usually a woman. The title suggests that she will put questions t

posted 9:02:55am Jul. 12, 2014 | read full post »

Rabbi Zalman joins the Dream Assembly
Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi related a wonderful teaching story about interactive dreaming in The Dream Assembly.  A bunch of Hasidic rabbis are discussing the goals of prayer. Instead of joining the debate, Zalman says, “I would like all of you to join me in a dream tonight.” Then he immerse

posted 12:30:35pm Jul. 09, 2014 | read full post »

The Pauli Effect on the Pauli Effect
“Pauli Effect” is a term used for the mysterious malfunctioning of equipment in the presence of a certain person. We all know someone who has this effect, stopping watches, crashing computers, blowing out light bulbs. Often the phenomenon looks like a kind of adult (or not-so-grown-up) poltergei

posted 7:12:51am Jul. 02, 2014 | read full post »

Reading "what is behind"; Divination in Imperial Japan
In imperial Japan, one-third of the officials in the Ministry of Religious Affairs — the Jingi-kan — were assigned to one department, the Department of Divination. Their job was to read patterns of coincidence and advise the emperor accordingly. They had many techniques for provoking a sign from

posted 4:43:19am Jun. 30, 2014 | read full post »

The scarab and the fox: how Jung navigated by synchronicity
Jung’s life practice of paying attention to coincidence and symbolic popups in the world around us is a model of how to navigate by synchronicity. In his work with patients, he

posted 2:30:50am Jun. 27, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.