Dream Gates

Dream Gates


Dreaming and the Art of Memory

posted by Robert Moss

Memory takes you home.

If you can only remember a place you have visited, beyond the Shadow World of ordinary cognition, you are halfway there. If you can recall the place in vivid detail, and enter it fully with your mind and your inner senses, you are there. I mean this in the most literal sense.

This (says one of my inner teachers)  is why much of the life training centers on the Art of Memory. Among humans, the most effective way to practice this is through dream recall and dream reentry. The memory of a dream is the memory of a journey. It may have been a short visit to a neighbor’s house or the place where you will find yourself on Tuesday week, It may have been a far journey, to a distant galaxy or a vast dimension enfolded inside a pearl a hundred million billion times smaller than human instruments can detect in earth reality. Perhaps you were drawn here, to the sphere of Luna, to study and play in this realm.

So often the dream fades, or you abandon it, not trusting your memory. But when you hold onto the dream, or gently let it return, a road opens before you. Move towards the dreamspace, and you travel between the worlds. Stay fully inside the dream, and you are home.

 

 

Night staircase by Adolph Menzel



  • http://sothismedias.com Justin Patrick Moore

    Justin as Hieromemnon chiming in. One of the things i’m intrigued by, and that I want to develop in my own dreamwork is the intersection between the Ars Memoriae, as developed in antiquity and on up to Giordano Bruno, as a tool for sharpening dream memory. Going the other way around, regular dreamwork, which starts with remembering our dreams can serve as an aid to strengthen our waking memory.

    In the “true” novel Winged Pharaoh we learn that memory is one of the keys to the Soul. Through training the memory can move backwards -and forwards- to “past” and “future” lives.

    Not wanting to forget (no pun intended) my Celtic forebears, I might also have to up my intake of hazel nuts to dip into the Pool of Memory, and develop my bardic arts, and the types of mnemonics they used to learn long lays.

    As much as auntie Google has given us in terms of the ability to look up a mysterious dream word, among many other things, I fear our reliance on digital devices has caused our memory to atrophy…those muscles aren’t being used as much. Consider the dependence people have on GPS units in their cars. Admitedly they can be useful, but so can landmarks, which brings us to the method loci.

    It seems to me that those of us who are called to be Hieromemnon’s – Keepers of Sacred Memory- must also endeavor to re-establish friendly contacts with the spirits of the land, which first requires a devotion to hearth and home. To remember our ancestors, to remember that we are part of a larger world, and to remember the world behind this world and awaken those powers which sleep and lie dormant in it. Memory is the great awakener. Let us remember who we are and what we are here to do, then set about doing it.

    • http://www.mossdreams.com Robert Moss

      Justin – I’m entertained by the synchronicity of your note about “Winged Pharaoh” (one of my favorite books) with the fact that on my plane trip to Boulder (around the time you were posting) I was reading the ranscripts of the “far memory” sessions by Joan Grant on which she based that book.

      Yes, the true art of memory involves much more than hitting the books and the search engines. It requires us to seek the memory of the land, of stones and trees. And of course to build “memory palaces” in the mind, and to delve into the libraries in the imaginal realm. However, Aunty Google doesn’t get in the way of the practice of Memory if we use her correctly and don’t regard her as omniscient; she can assist our work with clues – like that strange word or sigil from a dream that eventually proves to be from a language prevously unknown but ultimately decipherable – that can point us home, to where we fit in the larger reality.

  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Sylvie

    Very interesting post ! Yes , Justin, your comment is showing our lack of memories exercising in the waking life and our need to enhance them with appropriate tools . I’m sure this would be a great subject for a book ! Perhaps ,as registering our dreams may enhance our memory, the first things to work on would be exercise our memory in our daily life ! If you have tools or books , i’m interested in ! (i hope my english is OK!)

    • http://www.mossdreams.com Robert Moss

      Sylvie – You’ll find much that is relevant to this (including the keys to places, like the House of Time and the Dream Library) for practcing the Art of Memory in my book DREAMGATES>

  • http://sothismedias.com Justin Patrick Moore

    Sylvie, Frances Yates wrote a book called “The Art of Memory” which gives great historical background to the Art, but for me hasn’t been easy reading. There are a number of articles online about the art, but this introductory one by John Michael Greer is very good:
    http://www.synaptic.ch/infoliths/textes/arsmem.htm

    For the Bardic Arts, there is a section in Robert Moss’s book “Dreamgates” that goes into some of this. I would also look into the works of John and Caitlin Matthew’s in general. There “Encyclopedia of Celtic Wisdom” is a great sourcebook.

  • http://sothismedias.com Justin Patrick Moore

    Robert, interesting synchronicity. I agree that Auntie Google can be a great tool. I personally just don’t want to see it totally replace our other tools. Obviously I use these tools a lot myself, but at the same time I’m not a big fan of Kurzweil and the rest of the Singularity gang. I also think it is healthy to question the authority of these tools from time to time.

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