Dream Gates

Dream Gates


Rumi-nation

posted by Robert Moss

Angel - Persia.jpgA quick way of getting a message for any day is to open a book at random and see what is in front of you. The fancy name for this process is bibliomancy. The favorite book that has been used for such purposes in the West, for as long as we have had printed books, is the Bible. Abraham Lincoln used his family Bible – the one on which Barack Obama took his oath of office – to get messages in this way, including second opinions on his dreams.

I’m on the Connectcut shore this week, leading a training for teachers of Active Dreaming, and enjoying the gentle waters of Long Island Sound. One of my travel companions is Coleman Barks’ exquisite edition of The Essential Rumi, translations from the great 13th century Persian poet of visionary experience and direct encounter with the Beloved of the soul.

I’ve been looking to Rumi, as mediated by Coleman Barks, for my morning messages. Yesterday, when I opened the book at random, I got Rumi’s parable poem of “The Three Fish”.

Your real country is where you’re heading,
not where you are
.

There’s also this excellent counsel for the spiritual road traveler:

When you’re traveling, ask a traveler for advice,
not someone whose lameness keeps him stuck in one place

This morning, I turned to Rumi again, and was thrilled by his evocation of the nearness of the Guide, the one who is never hidden from us except by the many ways in which we hide ourselves from him.

We’ve come to the presence of the one
who was never apart from us

Then we begin to feel the afflux of a greater power. We are more than we are, in our little everyday selves, stuck in the grooves of habit and self-limiting beliefs: 

When the water-bag is filling,
you know the water carrier’s here
.

Encouragement for today – and any day – to open to the presence of  a greater power and to take the creative risks that draw the Greater Self closer.

Seated Angel, Iran, 1575-1600, Opaque watercolor and gold on paper. From the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Lent by the Art and History Trust LTS1995.2.72



  • Savannah

    Happy to add Rumination to my repertoire… What an uplifting way to start the day, thanks!

  • Gretchen

    I’d like to be a citizen of Rumi Nation!

  • Gretchen

    After I posted my comment, an ad popped up for the Audi Q5, which was my home in Feb and Mar as my family drove 10,000 miles around the US! It seemed an urgent synchronicity.

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/dreamgates/ Robert Moss

    Gretchen – I love your phrase “urgent synchroncity”. There is a tingle of confirmation here, since I spoke in the post about guidance for the “road traveler” on the spiritual journey.

  • Terron Dodd

    I have that edition of Rumi, too. It sits on top of an old trunk by the head of my bed and I sometimes notice the title an author on the spine: The Essential Rumi Barks and think, “What is he barking at?”
    Terron

  • Donna Sunshine

    Why do you think it takes us so long to come back to the presence of the one who was never apart from us? Some of us take much of a lifetime to realize this; to remember. I use to open my children’s bible when I had a concern and found comfort in doing so. Now I have a bag of tricks to choose from and if I don’t like the response, I use a different divination device. “Bag of tricks”, opps, wrong blog subject, that one belongs to the hand bag topic.

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/dreamgates/ Robert Moss

    Donna – The answer from Ibn ‘Arabi, another of the great Sufi mystics, is that God does not place the veil between him and us; we do. “You are the curtain over yourself.”
    When Dante finally succeeds in coming up from the hells and meets his radiant guide, Beatrice, inside the Mountain of Purgatory, in the form of the woman he loved and lost, she reproaches him for not heeding all the dreams in which she came to him across the years. The veil thickens and grows darker when we lose connection with our dreams.

  • Janice

    Hi, Robert,
    Very lovely. I must add Rumi-Nation to my books, as well.
    We must keep our children close to their dreams, so that when the world tries to re-educate them away from themselves, they remain their own guides.

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/dreamgates/ Robert Moss

    Janice, well said. And as we keep our children close to their dreams, we nourish our own inner child and recover our own life dreams.

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