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Doing Life Together

Doing Life Together

Are Senior Moments Happening to Millennials?

posted by Linda Mintle

stressed teensAs Dana was grabbing her purse to fly out the door, she couldn’t remember where she put her car keys. She was already late for class! “Mom, where are my keys.” “Your asking me,” Mom yells back. “I can’t find my glasses.”

Most of us who are older chalk these moments up to aging. We jokingly say we are having a senior moment.

But a national poll by Trending Machine found millennials (ages 18-34) to have those senior moments as well. You don’t have to be aging to be forgetful. In fact, 39% of Americans have forgotten or misplaced something in the past week.

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What do we think is behind all this forgetting and misplacing?

Stress!

All that multitasking and lack of sleep may be doing a number on the younger generation.

The poll also found that women are more likely to misplace an item or forget than men. And that there is more forgetfulness in the Northeast than the more relaxed country of the West.

So if your a young woman, living in the Northeast, with a lot on your plate, get out the sticky notes to remind yourself of your TO DO list!

Or maybe slow down a bit, take a deep breath, carefully place your car keys on a hook by the door and enjoy the moment!

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How Well Do You Really Understand Anger? Take the Quiz!

posted by Linda Mintle

angerbn2Tony insisted he doesn’t have an anger problem. Yet, by all accounts, people say he does. I asked Tony to answer these 10 questions. After taking the quiz and talking with me, he changed his mind.

See how well you do at understanding anger. Answer True or False to each question.

1) As long as I don’t look or sound angry, I am not.

2) If I ignore anger long enough, it will go away.

3) If I punch something or throw something, I will feel less angry.

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4) Anger is shameful and not part of a healthy person.

5) It is OK to keep the peace. That is what God wants.

6) If I express anger, my relationships will be in danger.

7) Women don’t get angry, just upset.

8) Christians should not get angry.

9) God understands that sometimes I just lose control.

10) As long as I didn’t mean to get angry, it is OK.

 

If you answered TRUE to any of these questions, you need to rethink what you know about anger. All the answers are FALSE.

For more help with anger, click on my book, Breaking Free from Anger and Unforgiveness–a small book that is packed with help. This book has sold over 100,000 copies. Get one today.

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The Difference Between Worry and Anxiety

posted by Linda Mintle

Letting Go of Worry -- WebI was on a national radio program last night talking about anxiety. A caller asked a great question. “What is the difference between worry and anxiety?”

Anxiety is that uneasy feeling, apprehension, a feeling of danger, doom or misfortune. Clinically speaking it a response to a perceived threat or danger. It is often produced by  anticipating future events.

Anxiety as a feeling is different than anxiety as a disorder. You can feel anxious and not have an anxiety disorder. And anxiety can be a symptom of other psychiatric disorders as well.

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Anxiety is usually prompted by fear. Fear is a warning system built into our bodies as a natural reaction to danger. It is healthy to feel fear when real danger is present. But when fear goes beyond real danger and lingers in our minds, it becomes anxiety or worry. It is often prompted by uncertainty and feeling out of control, a reality we all have to learn to handle.

Anxiety as a psychiatric disorder relates to confronting a feared object or situation. It is excessive and prolonged and often involves worry. It interferes with every day life.

There are several types of anxiety noted in the DSM V (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual)–Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) which is an overall feeling of being anxious that seems general;  Simple Phobia which is the most common and is related to persistent anxiety over specific objects; Social Anxiety which is anxiety around social functions; Panic Disorder which involves feelings of panic in which you feel or think something terrible will happen.

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Worry is the mental part of anxiety. Worry has to do with anxious thoughts.  ‘What if…”

Thoughts, however, influence your feelings and behavior. So getting control of worried thoughts is important. For help with letting go of worry, check out my book, Letting Go of Worry. It will walk you through how to let go of worried thoughts and not allow anxiety to rule the day in your thought life.

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Should You Reveal Your Secrets to Your Spouse?

posted by Linda Mintle

crying womanI was in the grocery store yesterday and the tabloids were headlining the secret love child of yet another celebrity couple. While we tend to expect this from celebrity relationships, secrets are a problem for any couple. The question asked is if it is a good idea to reveal those secrets to your partner.

Let’s think about how it feels to find out after the fact. Do you really want to be surprised with a secret 10 years into a marriage, especially one that may have impacted your decision to marry in the first place? And the person living with a secret carries a burden that may interfere with intimacy as well.

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Secrets tend to fall into 3 categories: 1) Things that are taboo–affairs, drug use, contracting an STI, etc. 2) A rule violation like partying, drinking too much at the office party, etc. or 3) More conventional problems like failing a test, hiding a health problem, etc.

We keep secrets from our loved ones for all kinds of reasons. We may be afraid of  disapproval; we may want to protect that person, or we may worry about his or her reactions. But self-disclosure actually helps relationships and builds intimacy. Living with secrets is like living in a house with a cracked foundation, it never quite repairs and creates problems. While you don’t have to reveal every thought in your head to your partner, keeping secrets about important issues is not recommended.

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Revealing secrets can hurt the other person, but it is the only way true repair can begin. You’ve already hurt the person by engaging in the behavior or keeping something important from him or her. Healthy relationship require honesty.

In relationships where trust is absent, self-disclosure can open the door to betrayal, gossip and violations of your privacy. Think, Linda Tripp and Monica Lewinsky! So don’t reveal your secrets to people you can’t trust. In fact, better to keep those secrets between you and your spouse. If you need help getting through the process, go to a therapist.

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