Doing Life Together

Doing Life Together

5 Habits of a Highly Productive Workers

posted by Linda Mintle

In a difficult job market, it always pays to be highly productive in your work. What are those habits that make for a good worker who gets the job done?

1) Refuse to multi-task. Research confirms that multitasking doesn’t pay off. We lose information when we switch from task to task. Even though women are better at this than men, multi-tasking doesn’t get the job done smarter. You actually drop you IQ an average of 10 points when you multi-task.

2) Check your email occasionally. The temptation is to check every time you hear an update but resist. Check at regular intervals during your day, not continuously. The thinking here is that the constant checking interrupts your flow and creativity.

3) Take a quick break. Your brain functions by using glucose. Glucose is spent after about 60-90 minutes which is why we often need breaks in our day to move around, get a snack and refocus. So get up, walk to the coffee, grab a water, and shake off the concentration.

4) Be a person who talks to people. Email is convenient but talking to a real person goes a long way, especially when the conversation is ongoing.

5) Avoid distractions.  This is one I had to really work on to be more productive. Close your door, put up a no disturb sign, don’t respond to your computer interruptions. Stay quiet and focused.

These may seem like small things when it comes to work productivity, but they can really make a difference.

Why Buffy The Vampire Slayer Hates Her Body

posted by Linda Mintle

Sarah Gellar is the actress who starred in the TV series, Buffy, The Vampire Slayer. She made news recently –not because she is married to Freddie Prinze, Jr. or because she is a vampire on the prowl again, but because she hates her body and suffers from a psychiatric condition, Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD).  She believes she is not alone dealing with this affliction -that many women in America suffer from the same.

With BDD, people imagines they are ugly, flawed or deformed in some way. Typically, they focus on a specific part of their body like their nose, chin, ears, neck, skin, etc.

I have treated this condition for years. It usually begins during early adolescence but can occur in childhood. In order to cope, patients often resort to repetitious behavior like covering their ears, hiding their nose, checking the mirror, excessive grooming, etc. The disorder impairs a person’s functioning. The preoccupation over appearance usually results in withdrawing from social situations and can lead to depression.

Treatment is usually cognitive behavioral therapy that includes such techniques as exposure, response prevention, behavioral experiments and cognitive restructuring.The goal is to change a person’s thinking, engage the person socially and stop the repetitious behavior that goes along with feeling unattractive.

Here are three questions to ask if you or someone you know may have BDD: (For more information, go to this link on World Psychiatry where these questions were copied)

  • Are you very worried about your appearance in any way? (OR: Are you unhappy with how you look?) If yes: what is your concern?
  • Does this concern preoccupy you? That is, do you think about it a lot and wish you could worry about it less? How much time do you spend thinking about (fill in body areas of concern)?
  • What effect has this preoccupation with your appearance had on your life? Has it:
    • Significantly interfered with your social life, school work, job, other activities, or other aspects of your life?
    • Caused you a lot of distress?
    • Affected your family or friends?

 

Perhaps Sarah Gellar’s admission of her struggle will give more young women the courage to treat the disorder.

Will Watching TV Shorten Your Life?

posted by Linda Mintle

It’s a know fact that smokers tend to live shorter lives than nonsmokers. In fact, smoking two cigarettes a day can shorten your life by about 22 minutes.

Now what if I told you that watching TV could do the same.

Couch potatoes, listen up!

Researchers at the University of Queensland in Australia found that after the age of 25, watching an hour of TV a day can shorten a life by about 22 minutes–the same as smokers!

Great. Most of us qualify for shortened life!

Don’t panic yet. It wasn’t TV that created the shortened life span.

The real story is that TV viewers are less active for long periods of time. The sedentary lifestyle common to TV viewers raises the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, overweight and other healthy issues. And of course, these healthy problems lead to earlier mortality.

So don’t donate those flat screens just yet. Get up and move and stay active. Your life may just depend on it.

 

Yearbook Picture Deemed Too Sexy: Mom Needs Common Sense

posted by Linda Mintle

Sometimes, you just want to shake a parent and say, “Really, get a grip.” That’s what I wanted to do to Miki Spies, the mother of high school senior Sydney. Instead of talking sense to her 18-year-0ld daughter, she is protesting along side her at her daughter’s high school. Here is why.

Sydney decided she wanted a sexy picture for her senior year photo in her yearbook. She submitted a pose that she felt was artsy and showed off her dancer body and desire to be a model. The yearbook editors (students) rejected it and asked  her to submit another pose. According to the local paper, the Durango Herald, the students told her she could not submit the photo  as a senior portrait but could use it in another section of the yearbook designated for paid senior advertisement. Thus, Sydney’s need to be artistically expressive could still be met in another section of the yearbook.

Apparently this didn’t satisfy Sydney or mom. According to the Huffington Post, the  mom posted this comment on her Facebook, “I wanted my daughter to chose a different photo but she is 18 and doesn’t always listen! I knew this would be hard and it’s proving to be.”

Now the mom is talking to a Denver lawyer to review her daughter’s case and might bring in the ACLU.

I say forget the ACLU and be a parent. What will you teach you daughter if you continue to pursue this?

How about talking to your daughter about decency?

How about talking to your daughter about following rules?

How about suggesting your daughter find a different outlet for her artistic expression? One that doesn’t go against the standard set by the editors.

How about not making senior photos about sex?

How about telling the lawyer you made a mistake and supporting the yearbook editors by placing her photo in another part of the yearbook? This might teach a bigger life lesson that she may need-respect for authority and following rules.

How about thinking about the editors point of view and what they would like to accomplish with the yearbook (maybe it is not all about Sydney)?

How about common sense? Do we really need yearbooks to look like cover shots for wanna be models? There are plenty of places to post those type of photos on the Internet.

How about looking at the bigger picture mom? Is it more important to fight for Sydney’s right to print a sexy senior portrait despite the standards already set, or is it more important to teach your daughter to respect others, herself, authority and be obedient to rules that still allow her to express herself and do not restrict her freedom of expression. To me, this is parenting 101. You don’t take on the school over this issue.

 

P.S. I am not attaching the photo because that is exactly what Sydney wants –more publicity, money and a modeling job. Sadly, she may get what she wants and learn no lesson here. And I realize that even writing about this is giving her publicity.

 

Previous Posts

Relatives Who Drink Too Much: How to Handle it
Question: We will be traveling to our relatives in another state for several family gatherings during Christmas. Two of my siblings are problem drinkers and I am not sure how to handle this with my family. We do not drink so my children are not used to seeing family members act up while under the in

posted 6:00:57am Dec. 18, 2014 | read full post »

Christmas Shopping With Toddlers: Dr. Linda's 10 Tips
A reader asks: As much as I love to shop on-line, I prefer to tackle the masses during Christmas and head to the malls and store. My question is, “How can I shop with two little ones (ages two and four) and remain sane?” I will have to take them with me but really want to give it a try.  

posted 6:00:45am Dec. 17, 2014 | read full post »

What's Eating You This Holiday Season? Keep a Log and Find Out!
Joanne looked at the chocolate-covered donut in her hand. As she took her first bite, she wondered, "Why am I eating this? I''m not really hungry, but the plate of goodies sitting by the office coffee pot just looks good. Besides, my boss is making me crazy! But is there more to the story? F

posted 6:00:24am Dec. 16, 2014 | read full post »

10 Ideas to Avoid Depression During the Holidays
It's the most wonderful time of the year....well, not for everyone. Holidays can be difficult if you struggle with your mood and family issues. However, there are proactive ways to keep your spirit bright. 1) Don't overspend. Avoid being caught up in all the deals, discounts and e-shopping. Fi

posted 6:00:31am Dec. 12, 2014 | read full post »

6 Tips to Avoid Child Meltdowns During the Holidays
Are you dreading that trip in the car to grandparents? Is the hype of the holidays overstimulating your children? Too  much sugar, too little sleep? Try these 6 tips:   1) Routines and rituals: Try to keep as many going as you can. Even when you travel, insist on a regular bedti

posted 6:00:20am Dec. 10, 2014 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.