Doing Life Together

Doing Life Together

Six Tips to Help You Transition with Change

posted by Linda Mintle

Fall reminds me of new beginnings. They are exciting but stressful at the same time. One reason is because new beginnings involve change. Change, whether positive or negative, brings stress.

Here are six tips to help you transition during any change:

1) Embrace the change.  Stop wishing things were the same. If you are in the middle of a change, don’t fight it, embrace it.

2) Change your thoughts from negative to positive. Instead of thinking of all the negatives and what could go wrong with change, shift your thinking to the positives. Intentionally focus on the up side of change and your attitude will improve.

3) Look at this as a new challenge versus an imposition or negative. Change means new opportunities. And novelty is good for brain health.

4) Calm down.  A few deep breaths and muscle relaxation if the stress is building. Read your Bible and quiet yourself for a few minutes each morning. “I can do all things through Christ which strengthens me.” When we face difficult change, God is with us to walk us through the stress and circumstance.

5) Problem-solve. How can I make this change work for me. Generate a few simple solutions. Think through ways to optimize the opportunity.

6) Live in the moment. Instead of thinking about what was lost, just roll with it and see where the changes takes you. Don’t anticipate all the problems. Stop. Refocus on now.  Relax, embrace the moment. Focus on the benefits.

In the end, we can fight change or embrace it. And when we embrace it, we usually grow.

Temptation, A Spiritual Poison Ivy

posted by Linda Mintle

I pulled a weed the other day. It looked harmless but turned out to be poison ivy. The rash has now spread all over my arms and face. I itch and am in pain and have had to resort to a steroid to get the swelling down. Just a few seconds of touching something harmful has led to weeks of pain and suffering. There was a moment when I looked at the poison ivy and thought, this might be poisonous (Leaves of three, let it be!), but in my impulsivity, I threw caution to the wind and picked it up.

How often do we do this in life and then pay a price later?

We must be aware of those things that appear to be harmless, but we know have a toxic touch. Dabbling in pornography or a flirtatious relationship falls into this category.  Both may seem harmless when you first look or engage, but end in serious negative consequences.

Scripture tells us to flee from temptation, not pick it up and engage in it. Do we do this? Do we turn off that movie that is causing us to lust? Do we stop the advances of our office mate, knowing we are playing with fire? Do we go to a party and drink too much and later regret our actions? Temptation is like the beautiful ivy plant. It looks healthy and harmless but is toxic when touched.

Think about the poison ivy in your life. Be intentional when it comes to fleeing temptation. The suffering you avoid will be worth it.

 

Matthew 26:41- Keep watching and praying, that you may not enter into temptation; the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.

 

James 4:7- Submit therefore to God. Resist the devil and he will flee from you.

1 Corinthians 10:13- No temptation has overtaken you but such as is common to man; and God is faithful, who will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able, but with the temptation will provide the way of escape also, that you may be able to endure it.

Can You Change Your Mom?

posted by Linda Mintle

A willingness to change helps in every relationship. We aren’t perfect and all bring some emotional baggage to our relationships. Perhaps you and your mother are locked in a situation now where a change is needed, but it seems too difficult to even think about.

I’ve had a number of women say to me. “My mother is the one who should change. After all she is the mother and supposed to be more mature. I’ll change when she changes.”

My answer to this comment is, “Maybe your mother isn’t in a position to change right now, or maybe she just refuses to change at all. Since only children fight about who should go first, are you ready to be a grown-up and start working on your relationship. You make changes and you’ll see a relationship change .

I like to borrow author Harriet Lerner’s visual picture of relationships. Mother-daughter relationships can be thought of like a dance. You take a step, then she does and a familiar dance emerges. Get that picture in your mind. If you make a change in the familiar dance, it changes the dance. That idea should give you hope. You are not a victim if your mother won’t change because any change you make in the relationship, will change the relationship. Expect resistance when you change because we all like to do things the same old way–it’s comfortable and what we know. Change is uncomfortable but possible.

If you want to begin making changes in your mother-daughter relationship, don’t keep hoping your mom will change. Instead, you concentrate on your step in the mother-daughter dance. Make the necessary changes. Work on your reactions to her and I promise, change will take place.

A Marital Lesson from Hosea

posted by Linda Mintle

As a marital therapist for the past 30 years, I have seen too many couples divorce over fixable problems. When I talk about fixable problems I am referring to couples who stop liking each other, grow apart and refuse to work on their marriages. Today, Christian couples have allowed their unhappiness to become an acceptable reason for divorce.

I can’t deny the growing numbers of people dissatisfied with their relationships and even hostile towards their once chosen mates. Relationship pain is real and hurts. However, an escape plan is not always the answer. Couple unhappiness can be remedied. But, it takes work, counseling and a return to the covenant vows for people divorcing over fixable issues.

The Bible clearly establishes God in covenant with His people. He then uses this covenant as a model for marriage. Both are defined as an unbreakable promise. The Bible is full of difficult covenant relationships in need of reconciliation. In fact, the most unusual is Hosea and Gomer. God instructs His prophet, Hosea to marry Gomer, “a wife of harlotry” (Hosea 1:2). During this period in history, God is disgusted with His people for their unfaithfulness and idolatry. The marriage of Gomer and Hosea, a symbolic and real act, deals with broken covenant and God’s desire to restore.  Hosea endures the emotional pain of spouse betrayal, works through the restoration process and redeems the woman who has wronged him.

More couples could learn from the Hosea story. Sin is acknowledged, repentance happens, emotional pain is embraced and the couple eventually transformed. The power of God’s redemption is once again revealed.

One application of this powerful story is that healing is possible even when couples have a “biblical out.” Restoration and reconciliation are repeated biblical themes. Through out history God goes to extreme measures to woo his chosen and win back their hearts.

Sadly God’s covenant, whether in relationship with Him or marriage, is constantly challenged by our idolatry, adultery and rejection. We easily complain, feel abandoned when prayer isn’t immediately answered and become distracted by things that pull us away from intimacy. Then, like in our marriages, we stare into space, feeling numb and wonder, “What happened? I don’t feel intimate or connected.” Emotional distance ensues, a predictor of relationship breakup.

So could we learn something from the marriage of Hosea and Gomer, especially when marital problems are fixable? Think about it, you serve a God who wants to restore you to covenant with Him when you wander away. Maybe we need to be more restoring of our marital covenants as well.

 

Previous Posts

Treating Binge Eating With Medication?
Every day Sally vows she will not eat herself sick. But today is no different. She is distressed, eating past full and feeling as if she has no control. Sally suffers from Binge Eating Disorder (BED) which has been recognized as a psychiatric disorder. To date, there are no medications approved f

posted 6:00:35am Jan. 26, 2015 | read full post »

Is Binge Drinking Just College Fun?
In the throws of January, college students begin dreaming about Spring Break. Those plans often include partying on a beach with nonstop drinking. Binge drinking is "a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels to 0.08 g/dL. This typically occurs after 4 drinks for w

posted 6:00:57am Jan. 23, 2015 | read full post »

Does the Cold Make You Catch a Cold?
My mom used to tell me to put a hat on my baby when the weather was cold. I used to argue, "Mom, babies don't catch colds from the cold. They get them from viruses. I'm not putting a hat on the baby." But now it seems that my mom could have been on to something. Could the cold weather actually p

posted 6:00:36am Jan. 21, 2015 | read full post »

How Often Should I Weigh Myself?
We all know that the number on the scale isn't suppose to define us, but that doesn't stop us from thinking about how much we weigh on any given day. And the number often influences our mood. So how often should we weigh? Every day, once a week, once a month? The answer depends on your goal--t

posted 6:00:28am Jan. 19, 2015 | read full post »

Do Professional Women Have a Place in the Church?
It was a usual Sunday and time for announcements. The Associate Pastor announced the women's meeting at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. The focus was on decorating the church for the holidays. The men were meeting Friday morning at 6:30 am. to discuss marketplace ministry. I looked at my husband and whispere

posted 6:00:30am Jan. 16, 2015 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.