Doing Life Together

Doing Life Together


A Non Medication Treatment for Depression

posted by Linda Mintle

Not every person who is depressed can tolerate the side effects of antidepressants, nor are the medications always effective. So if a treatment with few side effects that targeted a specific region of the brain was available, would you be interested?

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) may be that treatment. In 2009, TMS was approved by the FDA as an alternative form of treatment for treatment resistant patients. It uses technology to alter brain functions similar to what happens with medications and even electro-convulsive therapy (ECT). It’s being used to treat depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, and other cognitive disorders. The Mayo Clinic reports that TMS works best for people with moderate depression who have not been able to tolerate antidepressants. But keep in mind, this treatment doesn’t work for everyone, especially those who have not responded to electro-convulsive therapy (ECT).

According to Eastern Virginia Medical School, a TMS device generates a magnetic field that passes through the brain. The magnetic field is a powerful electric current that causes a therapeutic effect on the cortex of the brain. The current rebalances dysfunctional brain circuitry like a reset button on a computer. In terms of depression, the magnetic field stimulates nerve cells that improve depression.

The beauty of this treatment is that it is generally pain free and rarely shows any side effects.  In some cases, patients have noted mild headaches and muscle pain after the procedure.  A few patients have reported persistent ringing in the ear, and in very rare cases, seizures have resulted. The number of treatments needed varies with diagnosis. Drawbacks are that it can take several weeks to work and can be expensive.

Although there is more to learn about this procedure, it is a promising tool as an alternative treatment. For those who have not found success with medications, other therapies, or cannot tolerate side effects of medications, this is one more advance that might have real promise. In the case of any new treatment, however, we need time to evaluate if there are any long-term side effects and how to best use the treatment.  If you consider this treatment, talk to your physician about potential risks and benefits so you can make an informed decision and decide if it is worth the cost.



Previous Posts

5 Ways to Live in Financial Harmony
Money can't buy you love but it sure can make love difficult. Especially if you are in a relationship and not managing your money well. When it comes to money, here are 5 tips to live in relationship harmony: 1) Decide how your credit cards will be used when you enter a relationship. One person

posted 6:00:28am Sep. 12, 2014 | read full post »

Understanding Depression: Let's Keep Talking
This week, Janet Parshall had me on her radio show, In The Market, to talk about a topic the church and society have  a great deal of trouble discussing--depression. The phone lines were constantly lit up. People wanted and needed to talk. Emails were sent asking for help. With  1 out of 10 peo

posted 6:00:22am Sep. 10, 2014 | read full post »

Should You Try Again After an Affair?
We all know how devastating an affair can be to a marriage. The question often asked is, "Should I try to work through the betrayal and give the person another chance?" It's a question most of us hope we never have to answer. If you are faced with this question, slow down and consider what i

posted 6:00:46am Sep. 08, 2014 | read full post »

5 Safeguards to Prevent Cheating On-line
It's easy to do. You are bored, mad at your partner and notice a Facebook Message from an old flame. Your curiosity is peaked. What harm could it do to answer and catch up? Next thing you know, you are sharing the details of your life, only you aren't talking about your marriage. The messages

posted 6:00:50am Sep. 05, 2014 | read full post »

Do Genetics or Lifestyle Determine Our Diseases?
My father has type 2 diabetes. His mother had it as well. Does this mean I will get it too? Most of us look at our family history of disease and wonder if we inherited our parents' illnesses. We worry that because our parents had cancer, diabetes or some other type of illness, that we will get i

posted 6:00:15am Sep. 04, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.